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  1. 16 points
    Thought i would jump on the tour bus with this one being as its quite close to me. Visited with Lolly92 Some History Saint Cadoc's Hospital is located in Caerloen on the northern outskirts of the city of Newport. The building was designed by Alfred J. Wood FRIBA, London and named after Saint Cadoc. Saint Cadoc's church is located in the town. The hospital, which opened in 1906 as the Newport Borough Asylum, was built to accommodate up to 350 patients. Extensive outbuildings were later added on the site, but since 2005 the number of residents has been very small with the growing emphasis on care in the community. St Cadoc's Hospital provides a number of mental health services, Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Adult Mental Health Services are provided by 11 Community Mental Health Teams and Elderly Mental Health Services provided by 5 multi-disciplinary Community Mental Health Teams Pics Thanks for looking
  2. 15 points
    Living just a few minutes drive away, @SpiderMonkey and I decided not to leave this one too long. The place is still pretty clean, just a few leaves around the place now. I'm not sure what the future will hold, maybe it will stay and get overgrown for a bit, who knows... Opening on the 27th May 1993, Pleasure Island was a theme park in Cleethorpes featuring 47 rides including roller coasters amongst the thrill rides and numerous smaller rides for younger visitors. Work began in the 1980s to build the site on the site of a former zoo by the owners of Pleasurewood Hills park near Lowestoft, and the new site in Cleethorpes was set to have the same name. The company went into receivership in the early 1990s and construction was halted. The site was then sold to Robert Gibb, the owner of Flamingo Land in North Yorkshire. Construction resumed and was completed in 1992, opening the following year. View over the park from the top of the roller coaster In 2010 Flamingo Land and Pleasure Island were separated into two independent companies, with Robert Gibb retaining Flamingo Land and his sisters Vicky Gibb and Melanie Wood (formerly Gibb) taking control of Pleasure Island. Unexpectedly, the park was temporarily closed in 2010 while negotiations took place, staff and visitors were turned away at the front gate. A petting zoo was added in 2013, along with a tractor ride replacing an old monorail. In 2016 it was announced the park would be closing at the end of the season, and only the McCormack’s bar would be reopening in 2017. On arriving at the park, visitors were greeted with an Old England themed entrance area with pay booths Making your way, you start to move through the different areas. First up was Morocco... Gravitron Ride The Galleon Pirate Ship Then on to the dodgems.... Tucked away in the corner of the park were the sea lions. The pool was still full of water and I'm not sure whether the inhabitants had been re-homed yet... Continuing around the park we find a few more rides... And a quick stop off at the Astra Slide gives a nice view over the areas we've just looked around Heading into White Knuckle Valley, first we find the Terror Rack... And then come across the main attraction, the Boomerang roller coaster The view from the top was pretty spectacular! Continuing on, we find the Pendulus ride Kids slider and Paratower And the Mini Mine Train Finally, we look at the Carousel ride, which is a really old traditional carousel. My favourite!
  3. 13 points
    New Scotland Yard New Scotland Yard was located on Broadway in Victoria and has been the Metropolitan Police's headquarters since 1967. By the 1960s the requirements of modern technology and further increases in the size of the force meant that it had outgrown its Victoria Embankment site. In 1967 New Scotland Yard moved to the site on Broadway, which was an existing office block acquired under a long-term lease. The Met's senior management team was based at New Scotland Yard, along with the Met's crime database. This uses a national computer system developed for major crime enquiries by all British forces, called Home Office Large Major Enquiry System, more commonly referred to by the acronym HOLMES, which recognises the great fictional detective Sherlock Holmes. The training programme is called 'Elementary', after Holmes's well-known, yet apocryphal, phrase "elementary, my dear Watson". A number of security measures were added to the exterior of New Scotland Yard during the 2000s, including concrete barriers in front of ground-level windows as a countermeasure against car bombing, a concrete wall around the entrance to the building, and a covered walkway from the street to the entrance into the building. Armed officers from the Diplomatic Protection Group patrolled the exterior of the building along with security staff. In May 2013 the Metropolitan Police confirmed that the New Scotland Yard building on Broadway would be sold and the force's headquarters would be moved back to the Curtis Green Building on the Victoria Embankment, and renamed Scotland Yard. Ahead of the move to the Embankment, the Metropolitan Police sold New Scotland Yard to Abu Dhabi Financial Group in December 2014 for £370 million. Staff left New Scotland Yard on 1 November 2016, when ownership of the building was passed to Abu Dhabi Financial Group who plan to redevelop the site into luxury apartments, offices and shops. The Metropolitan Police are due to move to the Embankment in early 2017. Since this appeared on here a couple of months ago I've visited a few times with @Maniac, @KM Punk, @starlight, @extreme_ironing, @Miss.Anthrope, @adders, @Porkerofthenight, @DirtyJigsaw, @TrollJay, @Merryprankster, monkey, suboffender, silentwalker, theriddler, dragonsoop, and many non members. Most of these photos were taken on my first visit when we did a sweep of every floor looking for anything of interest. Much had been stripped before the Met handed it over unfortunately but there was still enough to make it a decent explore. The view from the roof is pretty sensational on a clear evening, made even more special by the fact you are sitting on top of perhaps the most notorious police Headquarters in the world. A great place for a dragon soop and some classic 80s tunes. 1. Starting from the bottom and working our way up, the underground car park. Sadly no bunkers or anything quite so interesting under here. 2. Security control room for monitoring cctv and opening gates. 3. 4. 5. Press conference room 6. Briefing room 7. Locker room, now in use by construction workers. 8. A message from the last officer to leave 9. These marble lift lobbies were the only bit of grandeur really, the lifts were still fully functional which came in handy a couple of times. 10. 11. The remains of a once plush office 12. How most of the building looked....stripped and being prepared for a new lease of life 13. Pretty much every floor had large server rooms in the centre, this one in particular held restricted access servers. 14. Where firearms would have been distributed, there was a similar firearms storage room on the ground floor. 15. Label on the cupboard above 16. Sand boxes presumably for discharging rounds of ammo when handing in firearms 17. safe room 18. 19. Bridge connecting the two buildings together 20. Just off the bridge sat this lecture theatre, a week later it was completely ripped to pieces. 21. 22. Canteen 23. Cctv monitoring work station 24. 25. Plant room on the top floor 26. Engineer's control room 27. 28. And last but not least, the rooftop. 29. 30. 55 Broadway, TfL's art deco Headquarters until recently 31. Buckingham Palace 32. One of the best views in London really 33. 34. 35. Fish eye view from the top of the mast. Scotland Yard, it's been emotional.....
  4. 12 points
    This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company. Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit. It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all... Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!" Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend. More luck that time. Have to say, definitely worth it... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!!
  5. 12 points
    First report from the latest trip abroad! This old mansion sits in a small village, the gates are wide open and the locals don't seem to even care about it. The highlight here was definitely the grand entrance hall, surrounded by pillars, red carpet, grand staircase, and a lumiere-esque balcony above it. There were also some pretty nice side rooms too. From what I can gather the last use this building had was as a hotel, judging by the slight modernization of some areas. A nice relaxed explore with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. Featuring: My tripod because I'm too lazy to shop it out. Cheers
  6. 12 points
    Great Tew Manor was originally built around 1730, with extensions added in 1834 and 1856. Shortly after the First World War the owner died and the house was left empty until the 1960s. A further period of neglect in the 80s left most of the house uninhabitable. One end of the house has now been renovated and is occupied but the majority of the building is still in poor condition, clad in scaffolding and plastic sheeting. Several sections of floor and ceiling have now collapsed, the 'ongoing restoration project' doesn't appear to have got very far sadly. Shame as it's a spectacular building. I'd never heard of this place before, it just popped up while I was doing some research. I soon discovered a flurry of reports from 2010 to 2013, but nothing ever since. A few comments on the old reports suggested the whole place had been fully refurbished but I couldn't find anything online to verify this so we decided to go take a look for ourselves. Glad we did as it's not changed much at all and it's an absolute belter. Shame we only had 45 mins of daylight left though as I easily could have spent hours in there. There were lots of things I didn't capture with my camera, old documents dating back over 100 years and tunnels running underneath the whole of the house. A good end to a quality weekend with my bitches @Miss.Anthrope and Cankles, perhaps we will return here some time for afternoon tea. 1. 2. 3. This was inside the dome shaped roof section, you can just make out the decorative patterns on the walls 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Roof collapse in the attic 17. and on the floor below.... 18. However this was the best part, the Gothic revival library. An absolute stunner and somehow still in pristine condition. 19. 20. 21. Thanks for looking
  7. 12 points
    History This mortuary was nestled in the Northern Ireland countryside. It was small, quaint & perfect! A small chapel inside accompanied the mortuary. With no body fridges which was one of the first things I noticed I could only put that down to either it was a mortuary whereby bodies were not stored or given the history of Northern Ireland & tradition with death they were not needed as bodies are usually buried within 3 days. Possible that a body fridge could have been removed I guess but no signs that there was ever one there. The main thing I noticed which was pretty hard to miss was the perfectly kept porcelain table. Not only porcelain but a rotating one! I had the pleasure of visiting another in the north of the UK a couple of years ago & that in itself shows how hard to come by these are. Now anyone who knows me & my love for death/mortuaries/embalming etc will know this was like pure porn to me. When searching for new places, the unseen if you like.. to find a fresh one and one of this kind is infact a rareity. To be able to put together the history, including that of the slab is as interesting as visiting it The table was deep, very big lip on it. No drainage channels at all, just a nice recess around the perimeter which deepened leading to a drain at the far end. Then on the foot of the table was the word Twyfords, now I Still haven't got around to seeing 2 Twyfords porcelain tables at another uk mortuary and others which have long gone. Twyfords are known for their sanitary products, toilets, basins etc but they extended in to the mortuary field too. Cliff Vale potteries was built by TW Twyford in 1887. It was Cliff Vale where the slabs were fired in Stoke On trent. The word Twyfords would have been added with a 'flow blue' application..a deep cobalt blue inking. An underglaze pottery printed. The blue tends to flow in to the glaze giving off a blurred effect. This would have been done prior to firing the slab. The slab itself would have been fireclay, as would the belfast sink that you see in the same room. This firing recipe would have required particular firing conditions. Buff Coloured clay body with a bright white enamelled surface built to withstand strength and rough usage it was perfect for mortuary slabs. Lucky enough to find the porcelain slab and a Belfast sink with both wings intact was something of a find. The explore I explored with @hamtagger, we hadnt been out much lately due to family commitments and took the opportunity to put our research to good use while out there. Visiting family over there always gives us a good enough reason. I knew from looking at this place that it was what we thought, it was what was meant to be inside that was questionable. Having made a journey to Frenchay to discover that only the previous week the ceramic slab and all stainless ones had been removed I was holding not much hope. I tend not to get my hopes up nowadays, just take the rough with the smooth. But this... well.. we couldn't have hoped for more. It was somewhere I didn't want to leave, very atmospheric despite being quite sparse. Literally no vandalism or graffitti at all. Just how we like it. There were signs that someone had been in recently but they had respected it as we had. I would definitely go back here, even just to give the old girl a good old polish! On with the pics... 1 2 3 4 An old advert from Cliff Vale & Twyfords (I found this online) 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Thanks for looking
  8. 11 points
    Such a beautiful abandoned villa in Italy. I couldn't believe my eyes when I entered this huge hallway with a stunning ceiling and painted walls. There is also a chapel, but we had to be very quiet, I didn't take a look, cause it was very noisy. Probably you have seen this one before, but I couldn't choose wich one to show you #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  9. 11 points
    Its been a long time since I posted a report, so here is my first of 2017. I hope you're all doing well. History (wiki) It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the taî'r uchelwyr (houses of the gentry) in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family (Lord Harlech). Its English correspondent is sometimes given as Porkington. A manuscript known to have been in the possession of Brogyntyn in 1574 was a copy of the Hanes Gruf(f)udd ab Cynan. The house itself is of brick dating from circa 1730 refaced and much added to between 1813–20 by the architect Benjamin Gummow.[3] It is noted for a portico of four giant unfluted Ionic columns with scrolls and pediment. Outside can be seen an arch with 2 pairs of unfluted Ionic columns. In the entrance hall survives an elaborately carved fireplace dated 1617. Brogyntyn Hall and its 1,445-acre estate, was sold by the 6th and present Baron Harlech in 2001 for less than £5m to a local developer, who divided up the estate, and investigated the potential for a retirement community development in and around the Hall.[4][5] However, the Hall and 234 acres went up for sale for £5m in December 2013.[6]
  10. 11 points
    Last month @SpiderMonkey and I were given the heads-up on this place and after a quick Google we decided to head down to Worcester at the next available opportunity. We noticed a few people had tried before, only to find active security scuppering their success, so we were slightly apprehensive about what we may have to deal with. It would seem we got lucky with timing and found it relatively relaxed. I had serious wind that day! History St Mary’s Convent School was originally Battenhall Mount, an impressive house built around 1865-9 for William Spriggs, a Quaker and Worcester Clothier, in the Italianate style popularised by Prince Albert. In the 1890s the house was enlarged in a matching style by the architect John Henry Williams of Worcester for the Hon. Alfred Percy Allsopp. Allsopp was a local brewer who owned the Star Hotel and was Mayor of Worcester in 1892, 1894 and 1905. The original house is now incorporated into the South West corner of the property. The building was used as a convalescent home during the First World War. It then became the home of the Sisters of St. Marie Madeleine Postel, a Roman Catholic Teaching Order, in 1933. St. Mary’s was a popular and well-regarded independent nursery and school until its closure in 2014. Italianate styled interior, matching the external appearance... Moving into the music room, which was just as impressive with its large fireplace And this drawing room! Entrance lobby and top of the tower Moving further, we find the later addition of buildings that forms the main concentration of classrooms Yes, we tried it out! Nursery St Mary's School also has a nursery in the same grounds, in a separate building set a little away from the main buildings.
  11. 11 points
    Colbert was an anti-air cruiser, later transformed into a missile cruiser, of the French Navy. She served in the Navy from 1956 to 1991, before being converted into a museum ship. She was abandoned off the coast of Brittany in 2007 and in 2016 she was taken away to be scrapped. Having missed this ship when it was moored in Brittany, I was pretty gutted to hear of it's removal for demolition. I didn't think much more about it until it popped up in conversation a few months later and I decided to hunt down it's new location. It turned out demolition was expected to take 18 months so we decided to take a punt seeing as it was only 6 months down the line at this point. All we knew was that it was meant to be moored near a certain bridge. On the first night our taxi driver took us to the wrong bridge so there was no sign of the boat. I asked some locals and they told me it was long gone, absolutely gutted. We soon realised we'd been to the wrong bridge so decided to have another look the following day. At this point we weren't feeling hopeful but as soon as we reached the bridge we spotted her in the distance. Bingo! Unfortunately the missiles were gone and much of the ship had been cleared out but it was still a proper adventure and good to finally get on board the dirty bitch! Bigups to @Maniac @Merryprankster Law & Ben. 1. 2. 3. Ventilation system for the removal of asbestos, this was what stopped us from being able to access much of the ship. 4. Officer's bedroom 5. Bunk bed 6. 7. Laundry 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Gyroscope 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. & 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. The Bridge 32. 33. 34. Bon appétit
  12. 10 points
    Solo jaunt, part 2/3 of my (temporary) swansong. Well, this was epic. The best asylum I've had the pleasure of exploring, and possibly the best asylum of the "post-classic" era when most closed. And definitely one of the most memorable explores I have ever done. If it was any one site that inspired me to finally visit the Emerald Isle, it was this. As always, I turned up at the site completely unprepared and without any idea of what to expect. As I walked round the building, I see the grounds are well maintained, and someone is there walking their dog. Is it security? What are those cars doing at the top of the site? I didn't have a clue. I wasn't feeling that nervous, so I spotted my (possible) way in and ran straight for it. Hidden from the view of the street, I searched for a way in, which didn't take long; though far from trashed, I can see where others managed to gain access and followed their path. I was inside, and was overcome with a really strange feeling; nervous, but like I was in another world (stay with me, I'm not talking about ghosts). I'm inside the building, and with the exception of the water dripping down there's a dead silence. The windows facing the outside are boarded, forcing me to use torchlight. All the rooms are empty and have been tagged with crap like "redrum" and the usual "haunted house" jibber jabber. One of the patient rooms on the ward. Small, secluded rooms were a contrast to the likes of the dorms found in places like Our Lady's in Ennis. As I make my way to the other wards of the vast complex, I randomly flick a light switch and boom! The room flickers back to life; the power is still on! Not only that, in so many rooms so much has been left behind. Unlike the likes of Fairmile and its empty, non-descript wards, this felt so much more real. So much more personal, even if it's just furniture. With no security to contend with, and hearing so little outside beyond cars going past, I was in a different world. I had stepped through the looking glass, and was lost within the walls of the institution, lost in my own thoughts. I'm alone, disconnected from the outside world. I feel no fear, but a feeling of peace and serenity as I wander the almost endless corridors. Apart from the crumbling walls and ceilings, it feels like this place is trapped in a time warp from when it closed in 2009. It is for this reason this has been one of the most memorable moments in my life exploring. Look into the mirror as two storks look down on you... it feels like a Hitchcock film. As I continue to wander the corridors, further away from where I was, there was less evidence of anyone coming here. No graffiti, no smashed glass, no footprints; things felt like they had been left as they were since closure. The ward below was only accessible from a single, long corridor. No idea what kind of patients were kept here, but there was once an identical ward at the other end; this had since been demolished, though when I don't know. There was no main hall designed into the asylum, so I went for a look through the industrial side of the hospital. This place kept on giving and giving. As the last port of call, I checked out the ground floor of the administration. The power was still on, and the check-in machine on the desk was still powered up and showing the correct date and time! I didn't turn on the telly to check if the CCTV was still live though, ha! Behind this room, there were tons of books piled up on the desks; inside were reports going back years regarding patient finances, admissions and discharges, in addition to letters written to and from patients (though not medical records). For privacy reasons no pictures were taken. I made my way back to my entry point, and made a swift exit. I was absolutely overjoyed to have seen what I saw, until I realized I made a ridiculous blunder... I forgot the bloody clocktower! D'arrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh! But instead of going back inside, I followed the dog walkers and locals and decided to have a sniff round the outbuildings. The signs said there was a mortuary nearby, but before I did that I had a look at the chapels. I can't work out why, but on this site were an original chapel AND a newer built one a little bit further up. Both, however were locked. The mortuary/chapel of rest was different... This had been completely boarded up, but here the door in the hoarding was unlocked. The best way to describe this mortuary, which was a modern build and not the original would be like an an "airing shelter", free to walk into but with rooms inside. I sneak inside, and there's a gurney in the corner. The door into the chapel of rest (which was still rammed with stuff) and two other doors (probably the toilets, unlikely to be fridges) were locked. I find one of the glazed windows unlocked, so I open it only to find it covered inside with protective mesh! Double d'arrrrrrrrghhhhhhhhhhhhh! Across the way was possibly occupational therapy and the farm buildings, accessible but full from floor to ceiling with beds and paraphenalia from the hospital when it was closed, making it impossible to take photos or navigate. The additional ward at the head of the site was completely sealed, and next door to the last live building on site so no access there. Inevitably any comparison to those two iconic Surrey asylums is anathema, but if you never saw either of these then a trip to St Brigid's should be at the top of your list. This is one of the best asylums I have ever seen, so get out there and have a look whilst you still can. You will NOT be disappointed! Lots of love, TBM x
  13. 10 points
    Explore; A very fun weekend in London including rooftops, underground things and opening live doors that seem derps, topped off with a tour of this place. Unfortunatley, they weren't allowing access to other parts of the premises however, the main part was cool. Visited with @SpiderMonkey @AndyK! and @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. Cheers for looking!
  14. 10 points
    These two old power stations sit on the edge of a live steelworks site. There is some really impressive old industry to see here, including a massive old gas engine hall which still contains one huge engine, which was actually the biggest of its kind in the world. All that's left of the other smaller power station are the boilers and a couple of small control rooms, no turbines But it's still impressive to see some dated industry. Visited with @AndyK! and Kriegaffe9. The first building we entered was the smaller station: After a while walking around on giant suspended pipes and through asbestos we find this compressor room: Gas engine hall: One of two more modern turbines inside the hall: Cheers
  15. 10 points
    History RAF Spadeadam is an active Royal Air Force station in Cumbria, close to the border of Northumbria. Covering 9,000 acres, it is the largest RAF base in the United Kingdom. It is currently used as an Electronic Warfare Tactics Range, to train the Royal Air Force and NATO allies. It is also the only mainland UK location where aircrews can drop practice bombs. Spadeadam has always been a remote and uninhabited part of England, until 1955 when the Intermediate Ballistic Missile Test Centre was constructed for the Blue Streak missile project – a project that was launched to develop a nuclear deterrent missile. The RAF took over the base in 1976 and under their control it became the Electronic Warfare Tactics Range in 1977. The range itself contains ground-based electronic equipment, including some that was manufactured in the Soviet Union, that create simulated threats to train aircrews. Across the site there are different real and dummy targets which include an airfield, a village, portable buildings, tanks, aircraft, anti-aircraft guns and vehicle convoys. The site was originally used in secret as part of Britain’s Cold War nuclear weapons programme. This information was only made public in 2004 when tree-felling work uncovered the remains of abandoned excavations for a missile silo. Since then, the RAF and English Heritage have attempted to survey the site and record what was so secret about the place, because there are no official records or plans for the base still in existence from the Cold War period. What is known, however, is that Spadeadam was chosen as a launch site because of its isolation, access to road connections and the surrounding environment which supported it with plenty of water. It is thought that Spadeadam was meant to be one of sixty launch sites across the UK, but most of these were never built. This report is based on the practice airfield area of RAF Spadeadam. It is hidden away in a small forest and completely surrounded by a peat bog. The airfield itself comprises a triangular shaped runway which features a number of aircraft (mostly MIG fighter jets), military vehicles and anti-aircraft guns. Our Version of Events It was a decent sunnyafternoon and we were a little tired of being indoors, so we decided to follow up a lead we had on an abandoned airfield somewhere in Northumbria. The journey was great, all the way up to the borders of Northumbria at least. But, from that point on the heavens opened and what had previously been a glorious day was now a very shit one. Nevertheless, rather than turn back we figured we’d just get wet and have a look for abandoned aeroplanes anyway. We arrived, in the middle of absolutely fucking nowhere and were getting slightly concerned about how long it had taken us to get there. It took a moment to get our bearings, since there is no signal out in the sticks, but we had a vague idea which way we had to walk. So, ready to rock and roll we ditched the car at the side of the road and headed off into the vast bog in front of us. Fortunately, at this point the rain had stopped, but unfortunately we instantly got soaked as we plodded across land that deceived us into thinking it was solid. This epic struggle continued the entire way. If anyone has ever seen the Vicar of Dibley sketch, where she jumps into the puddle and completely disappears, this was exactly like that. After much scrambling around in the bog, and wandering through dense patches of forest, we were well and truly lost. No signal, no map, no food, but plenty of water… It was bad craic. For some reason, though, we decided to have one last wander through some pine trees. We were feeling pretty deflated at this point, so I’m not sure what was driving us on, but in the end we were glad we did carry on. After another ten minutes of aimless wandering, we caught a glimpse of something that looked conspicuously like the tail of a fighter jet. I’ve never heard of mirages in a peat bog before, so I instantly decided that what we were seeing must have been real. Instantly forgetting about how miserable we’d been feeling, we waded on, working our way towards a great big silver MIG that was glistening in the fading sunlight. Once we reached the runway, we were surprised to discover that it wasn’t tarmac. It was some shitty gravel substance that was just as waterlogged as the damn bog. But, right in front of us were two shiny MIG fighter jets, and they looked fucking awesome after all the walking. So, conscious that daylight was rapidly turning into night, we whipped out the old cameras and began our invasion of the airfield. We began with the first two jets and then made our way towards what appeared to be an abandoned fuel truck further in the distance. It took a few minutes to get there, but it was well worth it since we could suddenly see six or seven more aircraft and several guns a little further ahead. Our assault had been successful, and we soon found ourselves surrounded by more guns and bombs than even Rambo could handle. We also found a few unused smoke grenades which is something we’ve never encountered on an explore before. We hung around the airfield until darkness was nearly upon us, then decided to call it a day because we suddenly remembered we had to walk back through a forest and a bog to get back to the car. So, still having been undetected by the RAF, we made our way back to the treeline. A little more worried about stepping on a mine now after discovering the grenades, or some sort of unexploded bomb, we headed off back into the bog. The same shit journey we’d endured an hour or so previously began all over again. Splish, splash, splosh… Those three sounds were back again, and they all sounded just as shit as before. Explored with Rizla Rider. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22:
  16. 9 points
    Last time I was here i never got to climb up the tower, due to some mindless kids smashing things up and the the old Bill turning up. I no theres not much to see in the tower but it was something i wanted to do, just to have a look for myself really and so glad i did as you get some lovely views of just what is left on site. I visited with a non member, who kindly took the last photo St Crispins was a large psychiatric hospital on the outskirts Northampton and established in 1876 as the Berrywood Asylum and closed in 1995. thanks for looking
  17. 9 points
    This chateau is located within about 50 metres of a huge abandoned sanatorium so presumably it was connected in some way, perhaps used for training or for senior management accommodation? I don't know, but it's still in pretty good condition for the most part and has some nice features despite being practically empty. An unopened pack of orange juice cartons suggests it has been abandoned since 2005. I'll post a report up from the sanatorium separately when I get time. 1. 2. 3. Scale model of the sanatorium 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. & 13. 14. 15. 16. & 17. 18. 19. 20. We nearly missed this little chapel, still in amazing condition 21. 22. 23. Au revoir
  18. 9 points
    Doughty House is a large 18th century Georgian house overlooking the Thames. It was built around 1770 with later additions. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786. In 1849 it was acquired by Francis Cook, a famous merchant and art collector who went on to become one of the richest men in Britain. It remained in the Cook family for almost a century until just after the Second World War. In 1885 Francis had a 125-foot-long neo-classical gallery built to house his extensive art collection. Much of the art collection was taken elsewhere after the house was damaged by a bomb in 1944, subsequently the Cook family left the property behind. The house was put on the market in 2012 with a guide price of £15 million. Both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent were granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery into ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. Works have now started on site. While in the area with @Miss.Anthrope we took a look to see if this place had changed much since @AndyK! posted it last year. It turned out to be pretty much the same although a little bit worse off. A few bits of graffiti have appeared and sadly the ceiling of the gallery has begun to collapse in places. Still an amazing place however and hopefully renovation work will be completed before it the damage is beyond repair. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Stay classy
  19. 9 points
    I think we all know that: places that we have visited, which no longer exist as a "abandoned place" today. Demolished, destroyed or renovated. They live on only in our memory and on our photos. I have collected here a selection of such places. Maison Heinen (LUX, visited 08/2010) - renovated and re-inhabited - 1 2 3 4 5 Maison Thiry (LUX, visited 08/2010) - demolished - 6 7 8 9 Maison Traufler (LUX, visited 08/2010) - partly demolished, partly renovated and re-inhabited - 10 11 12 13 14 Maison Zahles II aka Maison des Gouttes (LUX, visited 08/2010) - demolished - 15 16 17 18 Villa Lambin aka Maison Rose (BE, visited 03/2014) - demolished - 19 20 21 Tree Mansion aka Maison de Paille (BE, visited 05/2012) - demolished - 22 23 24 Villa Albert (BE, visited 05/2013 - demolished - 25 26 27 28 Villa Hektor aka Maison Champagne (BE, visited 05/2012) - demolished - 29 30 31 32 Maison Denis aka Maison dans la soirée (BE, visited 05/2012) - renovated and re-inhabited - 33 34 35 Chateau PR aka Chateau Clochard (FR, visited 07/2012) - burnt down - 36 37 38 39 40 41 Villa DAS aka Villa Wallfahrt aka Maison de la Croix (BE, visited 08/2011 - renovated and converted into a retirement home - 42 43 44 45
  20. 9 points
    The old Soviet military camp is one of my favourite ones in Germany. It was built during the Nazi era and later used by the Red Army. After the fall of the Iron Curtain and the withdrawal of the Soviet troops from the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), the area has been abandoned. I´ve visited this place three times so far, because I´ve been so deeply fascinated by still finding so many authentical remnants of the past, and I´m sure there´s still more to explore.
  21. 9 points
    So, I think most of us know the history of this place by now but for those that don't here is a brief.. Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients. The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute. During World War I, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital. During World War II, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, US Army and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients. On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. It continued to be used through to the mid-1980s, when care in the community began to reduce the number of resident patients. The decision was made to close the hospital as it was no longer deemed suitable for patients. Closure of the hospital is today, 29th April 2016. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger. So, with already a visit done the month before this place was starting to become a place of residence rather than a standard explore. On one occasion I remember sleeping in the car and getting chased by secca when they spotted us which made us move to a nearby doctors surgery where we kipped in the car park. I woke up the following morning with builders glancing in the car. Quick wake up, get ourselves together and leave! The first time we visited there was an old guy on security, he was the only one. The next time we came we noticed that security had been beefed up a bit with 2 Mitchell brothers lookalikes. I do prefer a bit more decay really but there is something about this place. Anyway, must say a massive thanks to @Pinkman who gave us help with this particular visit. Thanks We were completely undetected in the section where we started then having to move through the corridors got a bit more risky but in the end we managed a fair bit. I did get a bit agitated when I had to climb out of a window and straight back in to another because the way this place is built there are bloody windows everywhere but it just added to the adrenalin! So much more to see of this place & much more to come Anyway, pics! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Thanks for looking!
  22. 9 points
    History The Rest has an eventful history: it was conceived as the project of Victorian doctor James Lewis and his wife Charlotte, who were determined to provide a convalescent home for working men, women and children from the local area. Florence Nightingale lent her support to the scheme in 1869, after which Dr Lewis acquired the site. In 1877 The Rest admitted its first patients: the 7 survivors of the Ty Newydd Colliery disaster, who had been trapped underground for 10 days. The Rest was also used as an Auxiliary War Hospital from 1915, providing a safe haven and care for more than 2,500 wounded British, Australian, New Zealand and Canadian soldiers during World War I and again during World War II, before being returned to civilian use in 1946. A local one for me and a real shame that many of the original features of this building have long disappeared. Now there are plans to turn the building into 59 luxury sea view apartments which will save the building as its in a sorry state at the moment. Pics Thanks
  23. 9 points
    So, I was in Bristol for a mate's birthday and we ended up in the most random of places, a sausage fest. They love a good sausage fest these Bristolians, @WhoDaresWins and @END-PROC jumped in the car as soon as they heard a mention of it. Anyway, a couple of beers later they kindly showed me around this grand bank in the city centre so much thanks to those guys. Renovation was well under way at this point but it didn't make the banking hall and vaults any less impressive. The former Lloyds Bank is a Grade II listed building, built in 1854 on Corn Street in Bristol. It was originally the headquarters of the West of England and South Wales Bank until it went bust in 1878. It then became a branch of Lloyds bank until it's closure in early 2014. It has now been turned into a boutique hotel so if you're planning to visit and do an urbex, you're too late I'm afraid. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for looking
  24. 8 points
    My friend told me about this outdoor pool hidden in the woods and showed me a few pics.i just knew I had to see this.always one for something unusual and different.fast forward a few months and I was travelling back from my last trip to Scotland.i popped in on the way home.i took the stroll through the woods and there it was sunken below in the trees.it is in the grounds of a Manor House.i have no idea when it was built.but it's in a state now.the coloumns around the pool use to have statues on them.you can still see the original tiles and hand rails.it sits in a bit of a sun trap.the pool is filled with natural spring water.which has been been filtered off to feed the pool.the water still flows next to the pool.with holes in the concrete everywhere.i would say this pool was for the more well off.i fell in love with this place.the peace and tranquility was lovely.and can imagine it was grand in its hey day. The pool how it was in the sixties How it looks now from above the water filter system. Bathers steps from the changing rooms The deep end steps Pool lights I would guess this was the diving board frame
  25. 8 points
    The old sanatorium was once used as recreation home for staff of a well-known German company. At the beginning of the 20th century, the building was donated by the daughter of the company founder to the spa town X. It has been abandoned since the early 1990s. The building is now in a heavy state of decay. Yet, there are some plans to revitalize the area. While exploring that place I also made new friends... This fellow suddenly just sat right in front of me...:
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