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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/23/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Whats This a report from me NOOOOOO Wayyyy lol. Sorry aint been upping much hopefully that will change. Anyways i know a few been here etc but thought i would up mine. History: Not much im afraid and i aint copying anyone else. What i do know is a pub/club was underneath and its been up for sale quite a bit. Also it has some lovely terracotta walls etc . Explore: Visited on a invite from @GRONK after a little look with @stranton and mentioned it to gronk has it could be worth a visit has me and strant didn't get time. And even though a lot is trashed a lot was deffo worth the trip. And getting in well it was more open than some of the ladies of the night i have seen in both Leeds and Sheffield lol. A big difference from when me and strant went. Anyways on with what you want to see the pics. so enjoy all. A few shots from bar area .. Dont forget your coat lol.. Now my fave bits .. @GRONK getting in my shot lol The smell in here ffs was unreal. #URBEXPOO lol Ok thats it for now enjoy sll. Will deffo try to get some more done. If not before crimbo have a cracking Christmas all and a urbex filled 2018 for all. Thanks for looking.....
  2. 1 point
    History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  3. 1 point
    Carrozzeria Ghia was a car company that designed and build car bodies for other car brands like Volkswagen, Detomaso and Fiat. The company was founded in 1916. In 1970 the company was sold to Ford Motor Company who took the whole designstudio to Detroit. At this time the building was abandoned and is still to this day. The design studio where masterpieces where created like the Volkswagen Karmann Ghia and the Detomaso Pantera The factory halls This is the old factory hall where the low volume models where build like concept cars and limited edition cars This is a comparison from 1969 vs 2015 (Detomaso Mangusta on the picture) I hope you liked my first post! For more history about the Ghia brand:
  4. 1 point
    Definitely the explore of the year for me - all the way to County Galway to see an amazing asylum. Almost a fail (as were all the other locations on the list) but to get to spend a few hours in here was totally worth it
  5. 1 point
    Grass is looking not too bad! Yeah a bit different this, haven't seen a football ground pop up for a while so thanks for sticking this up
  6. 1 point
    Lovely looking building from the outside but looking sorry inside Still worth it for that tile-work (love the tiled pillars) and woodwork. Cheers for sharing mate
  7. 1 point
    amazing pictures ! i went to see the developement last week and they have now completed it. What a beautiful project, full of character and history.
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    Very nice captures of one of my most favourite places of all time... I´m still trying to get used to the renovated parts.
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