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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/28/2017 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  2. 1 point
    After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
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  4. 1 point
    This was my first ever trip down a mine. So a massive thanks to @EOA for making it happen and another massive thanks to @monk and his daughter for being excellent guides. It was bloody awesome, I could've spent all day poking around the sheds at the top tbh. Underground however was just amazing. It's bloody big this place so a return visit over a couple of days with many more mine beers is a must. History copied from the ever faithful Wikipedia. Obviously. Maenofferen was first worked for slate by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. By 1848 slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway, but traffic on the railway ceased in 1850. In 1857 traffic resumed briefly and apart from a gap in 1865, a steady flow of slate was dispatched via the railway. The initial quarry on the site was known as the David Jones quarry which was the highest and most easterly of what became the extensive Maenofferen complex. In 1861 the Maenofferen Slate Quarry Co. Ltd. was incorporated, producing around 400 tons of slate that year. The company leased a wharf at Porthmadog in 1862 and shipped 181 tons of finished slate over the Ffestiniog Railway the following year. During the nineteenth century the quarry flourished and expanded, extending its workings underground and further downhill towards Blaenau Ffestiniog. By 1897 it employed 429 people with almost half of those working underground. The Ffestiniog Railway remained the quarry's major transport outlet for its products, but there was no direct connection from it to the Ffestiniog's terminus at Duffws. Instead slate was sent via the Rhiwbach Tramway which ran through the quarry. This incurred extra shipping costs that rival quarries did not have to bear. In 1908 the company leased wharf space at Minffordd, installing turntables and siding to allow finished slates to be transshipped to the standard gauge railway there. In 1920 the company solved its high shipping costs by building a new incline connecting its mill to the Votty & Bowydd quarry and reaching agreement to ship its products via that company's incline connection to the Ffestiniog Railway at Duffws. Modern untopping operations at Maenofferen. The uncovered chambers of the Bowydd workings are clearly visible In 1928 Maenofferen purchased the Rhiwbach quarry, continuing to work it and use its associated Tramway until 1953. When the Ffestiniog Railway ceased operation in 1946, Maenofferen leased a short length of the railway's tracks between Duffws station and the interchange with the LMS railway, west of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Slate trains continued to run over this section until 1962, Maenofferen then becoming the last slate quarry to use any part of the Ffestiniog Railway's route. From 1962 slate was shipped from the quarry by road, although the internal quarry tramways including stretches of the Rhiwbach tramway continued in use until at least the 1980s. The quarry was purchased by the nearby Llechwedd quarry in 1975 together with Bowydd, which also incorporated the old Votty workings: these are owned by the Maenofferen Company. Underground production at Maenofferen ceased during November 1999 and with it the end of large-scale underground working for slate in north Wales. Production of slate recommenced on the combined Maenofferen site, consisting of "untopping" underground workings to recover slate from the supporting pillars of the chambers. Material recovered from the quarry tips will also be recovered for crushing and subsequent use. Anyway onto my poto’s My first ever photo down a mine.
  5. 1 point
    Difficult to decide for one place. But I think it was this little church that I discovered during my UK trip in summer.
  6. 1 point
    This ex Nato Base is not really spectacular regarding its structure or facilities but for its location. Situated on the top of a hill (about 1000m) it's a beautifull place to spend the night having a barbecue and some drinks with your buddies. Don't forget to wrap up warm. In the nights it's getting damn cold up there even in summer. #1 DSC07419 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC07390-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC07385 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC07412-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC07395-Bearbeitet-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC07415-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC07414 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC07416-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC07417 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC07399-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC07401-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
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