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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/03/2018 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck. I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. History "In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton. As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital. In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations. By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959. In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991." There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. >Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to doing it properly, but its not an appealing one! >Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one IMO. >Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here but the camera never came out the bag. Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO. The Explore Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups. We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining. You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores! Photos
  2. 2 points
    OK, I said on the other thread I would add the older pics of B Block. I also have ones from admin the year before as well. No point boring with history yada yada as it was on the last thread. Visited with DK and IO a couple of times. Admin: DSC02755 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Where admin used to be DSC05467 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC02713 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Window DSC02724 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Large Ward DSC02731 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Side Room DSC02733 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Top of the Stairs DSC02736 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Theatre DSC02741 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Little Room with lovely Window DSC02744 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The Dark Ward DSC02747 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Map DSC02750 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External DSC02754 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr B Block: Looking out to A Block DSC05427 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Festering mounds of Pigeon Shit DSC05428 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward DSC05429 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr 'That' Doll DSC05431 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stuff DSC05445 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr TTW DSC05452 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Empoty Room DSC05458 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr The O2 Can DSC05462 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Chair DSC05463 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Klaus Wunderlich DSC05469 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Retro DSC05470 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr One Last External DSC05475 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  3. 2 points
    Ok, first post on here, so hope you enjoy. Just a small explore from middle of last year but an interesting little one one nonetheless. The Royal Victoria closed bit by bit over the last few years, finally becoming empty last year. Each time we pitched up there was always something still active so we accidentally left it a bit too long without checking. Big mistake, the neds burnt half the place to the ground and a sh!tload was demod to make it safe. Anyway, we managed to explore a good but of it but only took photos of the main block. The old Victorian building despite looking externally brilliant - has been so modernised inside there is no hall anymore - just a bunch of admin rooms. Enough babbling - on with the pics Main Entrance _DSC2237 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Inside the Main Entrance _DSC2229 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Staircase _DSC2228 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Sink anyone? _DSC2227 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Ward _DSC2224 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spotless Ward _DSC2222 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Spine Corridor _DSC2221 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Mural _DSC2216 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Bed _DSC2214 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Smashed Ward and Bed _DSC2205 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr External _DSC2239 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  4. 2 points
    So now is the time you start seeing this type of thread pop up. Favourite cereals, dog walking moments, cheesey tunes etc... Favourite derp should have its place For me, this is pretty easy. After a while out of exploring I finally got my feet the taste of mould and pigeon shit they had so desperately been craving. I got out once, nothing crazy, but it was out. A cash and carry in Leicester.
  5. 2 points
    Would have to be this for me....without naming it publicly
  6. 2 points
    Difficult to decide for one place. But I think it was this little church that I discovered during my UK trip in summer.
  7. 2 points
    Definitely the explore of the year for me - all the way to County Galway to see an amazing asylum. Almost a fail (as were all the other locations on the list) but to get to spend a few hours in here was totally worth it
  8. 1 point
    Nipped in here after G.B's last February. Not much to see building wise but there is some nice graffiti knocking about. I have seen some more recent reports and the graffiti has changed in parts now. Some for the better some not. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Sheffield Tramway was an extensive tramway network serving the English city of Sheffield and its suburbs. The first tramway line, horse-drawn, opened in 1873 between Lady's Bridge and Attercliffe, subsequently extended to Brightside and Tinsley. Routes were built to Heeley, where a tram depot was built,Nether Edge and Hillsborough. In 1899, the first electric tram ran between Nether Edge and Tinsley. By 1902 all the routes were electrified. By 1910 the network covered 39 miles, by 1951 48 miles. The last trams ran between Leopold Street to Beauchief and Tinsley on 8 October 1960—three Sheffield trams were subsequently preserved at the National Tramway Museum in Crich. . . . . This one was outside Cannons Brewery on the same day. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680624533806/with/33051734346/
  9. 1 point
    One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  10. 1 point
    Another one from early last year. A nice mix on the same site this one with the awesome old wooden part next to a burned out, vandalised, graffiti strewn new part. It brought into sharp contrast the difference between a interesting and unique explore with loads to see and photograph and a wreaked, empty and mostly uninteresting burned out shell. The feeling of enjoyment and satisfaction I got from both was definitely different. I found it an interesting experience in this mad hobby we do. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY The Old Fisons site was originally the location for the first ever complete superphosphate factory. In the mid 19th century, the increasing demand for new effective fertilisers for agriculture led to a search for a substitute for crushed bones, the traditional source of fertiliser. Edward Packard discovered that the use of fossil dung, found across East Anglia, contained high levels of phosphate, the ideal base for fertiliser. Between 1851 and 1854, Packard built a warehouse at Paper Mill Lane and pioneered the production of artificial fertilisers for horticulture on an industrial scale. It was an ideal site due to the combination of the River Gipping, which was navigable by barges between Ipswich and Stowmarket from the late 18th century onwards, and the addition of the railway line in 1846 which both provided the means to import raw materials and export fertilisers. Edward Packard was joined in 1858 by Joseph Fison who constructed his chemical works opposite the North Warehouse. The lower two floors of this iconic warehouse date from this time and were used for bagging and storage and are identified on early Ordnance Survey maps as the Eastern Union Works, proving the North Warehouse was purpose-built and directly associated with the production of superphosphates. The factory shut its doors in 2002 and has remained empty ever since. . . Thanks for Looking All the best for the New Year More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157678463886994/with/33624996416/
  11. 1 point
    I second that The_Raw, fave explore of 2017 for sure
  12. 1 point
    Evening! I've recently been catching up on the backlog from my latest, and most adventurous trip so far. We hit many locations, but some I feel only had a couple of shots worthwhile - not enough to warrant a report, but I really did enjoy these places. I thought an easy way of sharing these beautiful places would be to place them in one thread - an assortment of derp. These were takin in Germany, Austria & Luxembourg across my trip, and aren't in any particular order - although I do have some favourites! Unfortunately I don't know too much about the history of most of these places, but i'll include any i do know. I can imagine y'all probbaly bored to death of my spam recently, but I hope you enjoy these! Blue Sand House We spent the night in Czech and this was first on the agenda for the next day, so after a good night's sleep, a breakfast consisting mostly of chorizo, hot dogs and cereal we hit the road. 5 hours later we arrived here, and having been wanting to see this place for so long I was overwhelmed. I was so happy I finally got here. The house was full of sand in other rooms too - I'm not quite sure how it got there, or for how long it's been there - but it made for a nice photo. Green Ballroom I'd heard this was under new ownership, and he was charging for explorers for photos - I'd heard it was a relitively small amount and I was happy to pay it, considering I didn't really want to piss of any Germans. But, we arrived and he was nowhere to be seen, so, obviously we gave it a go and found an extremely awkward window. After squeezing through we had a quick look in here, but with 2 of our group not fancying the access we didn't spend long inside. The place was lovely - although it's a shame the local gaffers had been in recently. Industrial Dancefloor We were short on time and mid-way through another long stint of driving, so this was a nice way to break it up. It was only really this room, but it was nice - more to just get out the car and go for a mooch. Was followed by a rather large and appetising mcdonalds before continuing our drive south. Sanatorium Elisabeth I'd got my hopes up for this place - maybe a little too much. It's in a very sorry looking state, and once again the local graffers have been in - the only piece I sorta like is this one on the stairs. I didn't take any other photos here - but I do like this one. Cotton Factory This place was about a 30 second drive from another derp (pretty much walking distance) but we drove anyway! My friend had warned me of the owner - and that sometimes he is there. We jumped the gate and found a way in, and it wasn't until I was mid-way through my first shot I heard the footsteps. No doubt there was someone on the floor above, and it sounded like he was dragging something. Was it the owner? Who knows - not me that's for sure! With little knowledge of the local law and none of the language we didn;t hang around to find out. I grabbed these two photos before making a hasty exit. In the off chance I'm ever in the area I'd like to revisit, as it was a lovely place. Spiegelvilla This was a lovely little villa we stopped by on the way to Vienna, and although rather bland it still featured a couple of nice shots. Forst Zinna This was an extremely large military training camp, which had clearly been abandoned for some time. This was next door to another derp, so thought we might as well check it out too. We didn't spent too long here, as we needed to find somewhere to camp for the night and we were losing the light fast. It's not looking too good, and I'm surprised some buildings are still standing. Maison Kirsch This was the last derp we (successfully) done, and although rather dark, and stinking of poop it was alright. It seemed to have been abandoned for a long while now - deduced from the copious amount of stinging nettles surrounding it. And i found out the hard way, whilst wearing shots. After this followed a fail, before a rtaher long and sleepy drive back to the tunnel. Bad Gastein I am aware this is the town, and not a derp - but it was the whole experience that made it for me. I heard secca were on the ball here, so we spent a while casing the joint and baiting potential secca to see if they'd respond, but something didn't feel right. I only nipped inside one building for a matter of minutes to grab this handheld shot. It's clear someone had been in recently, with a rather comfy chair positioned near the main room, along with footprints and a rather new looking book. Before disappearing completely I stopped to grab a couple of shots of the town - easily one of the most beautiful places I've ever had the privilege of visiting. Thank you If you've made it this far - thank you. It means a lot that you've taken the time out to read this, and I hope you enjoyed it. Once again I apologise for the spam, but I wanted to get these edited & uploaded before my next trip - or it'd never happen. So as always, thank you!
  13. 1 point
    Thanks man, I'm actually trying to ween myself off the fisheye lens. Its great for certain shots, but not every single shot haha.
  14. 1 point
    Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. The contractor was Gianotti of Nice. Hobling consists of four combat blocks. The blocks are linked by an underground gallery with barracks and a utility area (usine). The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). In June 1940 the garrison comprised 115 men and 4 officers of the 164th Fortress Infantry Regiment (RIF). The commanding officer was Captain Boileau. The Casernement de Férange provided peacetime above-ground barracks and support services to Hobling and other positions in the area. The units were under the umbrella of the 3rd Army, Army Group 2. Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. Hobling remained under Army control until after 1971, when it was declassified and sold. Sold in 1975, Hobling has been partially stripped by salvagers and is abandoned. The salvage work stopped with the removal of all metals, including cloches and turrets, from two blocks. Hobling was the last ouvrage to be stripped. Visited with @The_Raw 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  15. 1 point
    Nice that, got everything going for it and that bathroom is ace! Decay is nicely matured too. Good stuff @hmltnangel nice to see you posting over here
  16. 1 point
    Some nice light painting in the first shots, and enjoyed the write up too Happy new year to you @Andy
  17. 1 point
    This actually has to be one of my favourite for a while. Crappy pics or not, I love the write up and the fact they are taken before I was born. Very welcome to keep those coming.
  18. 1 point
    Visited with Arold. History Casino Constanta is an historic monument built in Art Nouveau style between 1904 -1910, to meet the needs of the Black Sea tourists in the period known as La belle Époque: a time when well dressed gentlemen would read the newspaper early in the morning, enchanting ladies walked on the promenade, the sound of military music filled the atmosphere on sunset, inviting people to “dance” in their impeccable evening outfits. The man who conceived this challenging project, very modern at that time, was Daniel Renard, a young Romanian architect of Swiss origin. The building is exceptionally rich in decorations inspired by the vegetal and marine worlds: waves, climbing plants, beautiful flowers and fantastic shell windows, make you believe that you are in an undersea palace, where Poseidon is waiting to greet you on his throne, behind the curtain of the majestic theatre stage in the main room. The Casino is challenging your imagination step by step, with every ornament, every broken mirror, and every crack in the wall producing an emotional rollercoaster outlined by the magnificent view of the sea. What used to be the main social and cultural attraction of the city in the past is lying in despair today, completely neglected like a true old man celebrating his 100th anniversary alone. During World War II, the building was transformed into a hospital, and during the communist regime was a restaurant where, weddings, baptisms and communist events were organized. Little by little its fame started to fade. Having closed in 1990, in the 2000s the casino was taken under the care of the Municipality of Constanta. In 2007 the municipality signed a concession contract on 49 years with the Israeli company Queen Co Leisure International (QLI), in exchange of 140,000€ annually. QLI stated publicly that they would invest 15 million euros in renovation and transforming the casino into an international entertainment center, the biggest in Romania. The optimistic company forecasted that the investment was going to be recovered in 5 years, yet another 4 years passed and still nothing happened. The municipality ended the contract and started searching for a buyer. Soon enough this decision started a public scandal, where the Ministry of Regional Development and Tourism (MRDT) promises to take over the problem. The old Casino is supposedly going to be restored completely with funds from the MRDT’s budget. The new dates are placing the beginning of the renovation work in maximum one year after the Casino is officially under MRDT administration, and another 2 years to finish the work. So far the first deadline for starting the project is going to be August-September 2012. Our experience Casino Constanta. The most famous derelict building in Romania. After our trip to Moldova and Transnistria, there was no way I was going to miss this. It's the icon of Constanta; ask a Romanian what there is to see in the city apart from the impeccable Black Sea beaches, and they'll probably mention this. It even appears in the Lonely Planet guide! Up until this year according to Tripadvisor visitors were allowed inside, but recent reports suggested this stopped. I thought if worst comes to worst I'll just sneak in round the back through an open window, easy enough... but I wanted to be on the safe side and be guaranteed entry. A good job I did what I did, and contact the City Hall. I emailed them for permission, which was granted provided Arold and I signed an affidavit to say that they weren't responsible for any injuries incurred as a result of us going inside. Fantastic! Don't you just wish it could be like this in the UK? Just sign a form and the doors are flung open for you. Obviously it's under council care and a listed building, but I wasn't expecting the level of security they had at this place. When we arrived, we saw two guards outside in a cabin. They spoke no English, but somehow got the message that I was granted permission by the mayor to go inside. They called somebody up, and out comes a younger guard from inside the building, who spoke English fluently. Two guards outside and one inside, for one small building; this place is a fortress. I showed him my passport, and then Arold and I were granted free roam. The sights here are among the best of their kind. Absolutely exceptional details in every room. For a 1990 closure, particularly being so close to the abrasive salty sea air and water, it's survived exceptionally well. You can tell attempts have been made to restore the building in the past judging by workers' tools left behind; sadly nothing has happened to this day. Still, vandalism has thankfully been kept to an absolute minimum. The majority of the building had been accessible, but there were a few rooms which were nailed shut presumably to prevent break-ins and animals (although cats and pigeons inevitably found their way in). Again, a damn good job I didn't try to sneak in with the guard inside! One of my best photos ever. And to you dear reader, I present you now with Poseidon's lair. The centrepiece, the theatre! It was in this room that damage and decay was clearer after 26 years of disuse. Yet it still conveys a real sense of grandeur on an epic scale. Maybe I'm getting whipped up in hysteria, but could this be one of the best locations I've ever done? Heading backstage And now to round things off. And an external. So there we have it. On a final note I just wanted to say this. Even if it's now an EU member state and tourism is increasing, Romania is still a criminally underrated destination. Explorer or not, I simply cannot recommend the country enough. Get out there and find some more gems; there are cities like Hundeoara ram jammed with derelict industry so I hear! Not only that, you've got some of the best mountain ranges in Europe and most beautiful cities you'll ever see. Get out there! Love as always, True British Metal x
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    Bog time! 1- Romford 2- Colchester 3- Rochford 4- Chertsey 5- Frinton 6- There's a god reason why this is blurred, I was taking pictures casually to document everything, saw this and shot back so fast. The thing was brown and smelt pretty fresh... But then, what do you expect from Yarmouth?
  21. 0 points
    A productive end to a productive day! My favourite part was watching you cross the bridge
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