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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/30/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Been visiting this place for many years apart from the old Workhouse buildings which have almost disappeared, today we visited the chapel. Here are a few pics Added an update of the workhouse conditions too.
  2. 2 points
    The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  3. 2 points
    Former puppy farm that was often in the local news regarding poor living quarters,alleged mistreatment of dogs and the selling of dogs that often died after new owners took delivery of the young animals..the RSPCA were always closing down the business,but the owner John Lowe simply ignored them and carried on. On February 23rd 2014,Mr Lowe,who purchased Keepers Cottage in 1966,shot and killed his partner and then her daughter,who tried to flee and get help,but died just outside the cottage.Police arrived and arrested Mr Lowe who was found guilty of double murder later that year and jailed for life with a minimum tariff of 25 years so it is likely he will die in prison.From information on several estate agents websites,it seems the 6 acre estate has been sold but last year planning permission was refused for one plan to demolish the cottage and build 3 dwellings so as of January 2018,I have no idea what will happen.We arrived at dawn and immediately noticed red flashing cameras mounted firstly at the gated entrance then further down the track mounted on a telegraph pole and one fixed on the cottage all flashing busily.We were considering retreating however we decided to skirt round the outbuildings to escape the cameras if indeed that is what they are and not dummy alarms which I suspect they are...I have to say I found this explore both intriguing but disturbing at the same time and was glad to leave..I have not felt this way since exploring Cane Hill Asylum in 2008. My pics are only phone shots so please excuse.. Found this on Google Earth to show how haphazard this place is/was We arrive as the sun is filtering through the trees..this cottage sits within a six acre plot nicely hidden by the woods. The farm is surrounded by shanty type buildings largely held together with telegraph poles. Truly awful animal pens..I cannot imagine this was any better before the old man`s conviction. We skirt round the rear of the house avoiding the cameras Amphitheatre style seating/steps. Living room..very surprised to see that this fire place didnt seem to have been used for open fires. View from the master bedroom. And the enormous conservatory built round two elevations. I am glad I saw all this but upon exiting the house,some strange bleeping noise started so it was our excuse to leave!
  4. 2 points
    Hello Thanks for the welcome. I have visited many sites over many years , and have taken a fair few photos. (Not of all the sites) Royal Sea Bathing Hospital Margate Nethern Cemetary Cane Hill Severalls St Peters Mortuary Tooting Hospital Bethlem Clifftonville Lido Brookham Family Centre To name a few
  5. 1 point
    Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  6. 1 point
    "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  7. 1 point
    Visited with clarexplres and cheers for the heads up from Black Shuck a few months ago.... But as usual I only just got round to this nice post now. An hours drive and walking up the wrong side of the field to try and find the ROC post to start off with and eventually we were on our way in This was the 1st time I had been in a ROC Post and actually felt how cramped it must have been down there. With stuff strewn everywhere you could hardly more. This site is listed as locked on the Outdated Subrit site and you can see from the images it has not just been opened up recently either.... So get out there checking other ones folks. This particular post opened March 1958 and closed September 1991 What are they Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Posts are underground structures all over the United Kingdom, constructed as a result of the Corps' nuclear reporting role and operated by volunteers during the Cold War between 1955 and 1991. In all but a very few instances the posts were built to a standard design consisting of a 14-foot-deep access shaft, a toilet/store and a monitoring room. The most unusual post was the non-standard one constructed in a cellar within Windsor Castle. Almost half of the total number of posts were closed in 1968 during a reorganisation and major contraction of the ROC. Several others closed over the next 40 years as a result of structural difficulties i.e. persistent flooding, or regular vandalism. The remainder of the posts were closed in 1991 when the majority of the ROC was stood down following the break-up of the Communist Bloc. Many have been demolished or adapted to other uses but the majority still exist, although in a derelict condition. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 We could have had some serious fun if this was still there 12 13 14 15
  8. 1 point
    After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  9. 1 point
    First Post Guys! Anyways, my group of friends and I found an abandoned Gas Station south of Atlanta. Apparently, the gas station went bankrupt due to the county screwing them over. A new highway system was out in, and the road to the gas station was relocated, so in order to get to the station, one would have to travel a good 5 minutes out of their way. Not worth it. So the station closed down and now it looks like this. May go back to take more pictures soon, stay posted. Have a great day guys, and be safe!
  10. 1 point
    Not sure if this is in the right forum. Park Hill Estate is a gastly sight today although they are regenerating it. This made for quite a creepy explore. We have wrritten about the history of Park Hill Flats here.
  11. 1 point
    OK thank and glad you like them sorry for the delay
  12. 1 point
    History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  13. 1 point
    Yeah there's a size of 4MB per image. Alternatively you could use a free re-sizing software then direct upload. I use FastStone and I'd recommend it - quick and easy
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