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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/08/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    According to a report in August 2018 there were 18 pubs closing in the UK every week with 476 closures in the first 6 months of that year. It's a sobering (sorry) thought for someone like me who appreciates an ale or six in a nice hostelry. There are records showing The Bridge Inn here going back to around 1875 although how far back it dates is unclear. It closed permanently in 2013 and planning permission was given for change of use. I had the feeling that work was starting on redeveloping it when I was there. The Welsh name is Tafarn Y Bont - I wouldn't say there's anything that makes it distinctly Welsh - but its a good example of a traditional British pub which still has a few old features. It was nice that it seemed pretty untouched in the years since it closed.
  2. 2 points
    This doctor's office with adjoining villa has been empty for almost a quarter of a century. The last records are from 1994.
  3. 1 point
    We all know the history of this place and with so many reports going up recently but here is a short version. Inspired by Tumbles i decided to shoot some old BW Film. History Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. Whitchurch Hospital finally closed its doors in April, 2016 and is due to be stripped down and dismantled. Thanks for looking
  4. 1 point
    (Image Heavy) Browns Island is located on a river in the Midwest, the island has a long, interesting history. It was noted by George Washington during his travels, and Meriwether Lewis from the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped there in 1803, on the site there's an ancient Native mound, and early petroglyphs existed on the head of the island. For around 100 years the island was privately owned and farmed until 1957, when a steel company bought it to build a coke plant. There was also a mail plane crash on the island in 1933 that killed the pilot and passenger. In Dec of 1972, right before the Coke Ovens started operating, there was a gas explosion which killed 21 construction workers, the oven were operational until 1982, eventually, they were demolished and the island sold slag for commercial use until 2008. Although there were no ovens standing, it was still an interesting explore, my neighbor and grandfather worked here when the Mill used it. I was very fortunate to get permission to go on it
  5. 1 point
    History: The origins of the most famous coke plant in the city of Charleroi dates back to 1838, when a coke-fired blast furnace was established along the river Sambre by the newborn company Société Anonyme des Laminoirs, Forges, Fonderies et Usines de la Providence (shorten Forges de la Providence). Although coke ovens were present on site since the beginning, a first modern coke plant was established in 1908 to support the three existing blast furnaces. At the time, the Providence steelworks were amongst the largest in the Charleroi region and whole Belgium too. This favorable positioning was confirmed and improved after a general restructuring occurred between the two world wars. The first phase (1918-21) consisted in the replacement of ancient blast furnaces with five new ones: two at Marchienne and three more at Dampremy. The resulting expanded site was stretching for about 2 km between the Sambre (south) and the Bruxelles-Charleroi canal (north). The second phase occurred in the mid 1930s, when an additional blast furnace was built at the Dampremy site along with a large, modern coke plant. The latter (1932-34) was still located at the Marchienne site, slightly to the east of the previous coke plant. Equipped with a battery of 50 Koppers ovens, it had a capacity of 30.000-32.000 t/m and thus was able to satisfy the requirements of the whole site. The two coke plants used to work side-by-side until the early 1950s, when the older one was dismantled and the newer improved. In addition to the original Koppers battery two Coppée ones were built, each one counting 26 ovens. This layout persisted for about thirty years, during which Forges de la Providence merged with several other Belgian steel companies until the creation of Cockerill-Sambre in 1981. The latter controlled all the steelmaking sites in both Charleroi and Liège regions. Being the only one left of its kind in Charleroi, the Marchienne coke plant was improved through the addition of a fourth battery of 20 Didier ovens. This led to an overall capacity of 750000 t/y of metallurgical coke obtained in 122 ovens. Further corporate restructuring led to the creation of Carsid in 2001, which gathered together the last existing primary steel facilities in Charleroi, i.e. the Marchienne coke plant (Forges de la Providence), a sintering plant, a blast furnace and an OMB plant (all three originally belonging to Thy-Marcinelle et Monceau company). Decreasing steel demand plus the obsolescence of inherited facilities made the life of Carsid lasting for just a few years. The coke plant was run down in 2008, leaving the rest mothballed until the definitive closure (2012). Photos: I also made a documentary about this place (it has english subtitles) Thanks for looking!
  6. 1 point
    Very untouched. Nicely shot. Thanks for sharing matey
  7. 1 point
    Interesting to see somewhere different. I'm thinking the weather conditions helped to create a desolate atmosphere, which I quite like!
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