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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/09/2019 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    A trip through an abandoned pig slaughterhouse. Here you can follow the last path of a pig. 1 round them up IMG_1974-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 dead pig walking IMG_1990-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 shocking IMG_1994-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 beginning of processing IMG_1929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 cleaning IMG_1922-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 hair trim IMG_1927-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 hair removing IMG_1973 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 waist disposal IMG_1967-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 chop them up IMG_1915-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 piece by piece IMG_1920-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 meat chain IMG_1961-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 to the freezer IMG_1938-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  2. 3 points
    History: The origins of the most famous coke plant in the city of Charleroi dates back to 1838, when a coke-fired blast furnace was established along the river Sambre by the newborn company Société Anonyme des Laminoirs, Forges, Fonderies et Usines de la Providence (shorten Forges de la Providence). Although coke ovens were present on site since the beginning, a first modern coke plant was established in 1908 to support the three existing blast furnaces. At the time, the Providence steelworks were amongst the largest in the Charleroi region and whole Belgium too. This favorable positioning was confirmed and improved after a general restructuring occurred between the two world wars. The first phase (1918-21) consisted in the replacement of ancient blast furnaces with five new ones: two at Marchienne and three more at Dampremy. The resulting expanded site was stretching for about 2 km between the Sambre (south) and the Bruxelles-Charleroi canal (north). The second phase occurred in the mid 1930s, when an additional blast furnace was built at the Dampremy site along with a large, modern coke plant. The latter (1932-34) was still located at the Marchienne site, slightly to the east of the previous coke plant. Equipped with a battery of 50 Koppers ovens, it had a capacity of 30.000-32.000 t/m and thus was able to satisfy the requirements of the whole site. The two coke plants used to work side-by-side until the early 1950s, when the older one was dismantled and the newer improved. In addition to the original Koppers battery two Coppée ones were built, each one counting 26 ovens. This layout persisted for about thirty years, during which Forges de la Providence merged with several other Belgian steel companies until the creation of Cockerill-Sambre in 1981. The latter controlled all the steelmaking sites in both Charleroi and Liège regions. Being the only one left of its kind in Charleroi, the Marchienne coke plant was improved through the addition of a fourth battery of 20 Didier ovens. This led to an overall capacity of 750000 t/y of metallurgical coke obtained in 122 ovens. Further corporate restructuring led to the creation of Carsid in 2001, which gathered together the last existing primary steel facilities in Charleroi, i.e. the Marchienne coke plant (Forges de la Providence), a sintering plant, a blast furnace and an OMB plant (all three originally belonging to Thy-Marcinelle et Monceau company). Decreasing steel demand plus the obsolescence of inherited facilities made the life of Carsid lasting for just a few years. The coke plant was run down in 2008, leaving the rest mothballed until the definitive closure (2012). Photos: I also made a documentary about this place (it has english subtitles) Thanks for looking!
  3. 1 point
    The history of the Albanian Navy dates back to 1925, following the creation of the Albanian Republic. Albanian naval forces operate out of two main bases; Bishti-i-Palles in Durrës, and Pasha Liman in Vlorë, with four reserve bases respectively in Shëngjin, Porto Palermo, Saranda and a submarine base on Sazan island. The vessels of the Albanian naval force are mostly patrol craft and support craft as well as four whisky class submarines (Soviet Union built in the early Cold War period) which have been taken out of service at Pasha Liman. In Shëngjin a Soviet built minesweeper M-111 and an AFD-115 gunship remain abandoned at the entrance to a bunker. The Albanian navy still operates out of Shëngjin in a low capacity so it's still an active military zone but you are allowed to drive through it to reach a beach resort on the other side. Handy for us! Visited with adders, extreme_ironing, otter and reenie. Here's what we found.... AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M-111 - A mine warfare ship designed for the location of and destruction of naval mines which combines the role of a minesweeper and minehunter in one hull. Minesweepers are equipped with mechanical or electrical devices, known as "sweeps", for disabling mines, so waterways are maintained clear for safe shipping. This one appears to have been disused since 1996 (the date of a calendar on board), just prior to the Albanian civil war, when many vessels of the Albanian navy were seriously damaged. Behind it sits this half-submerged AFD P115 - Albanian Navy gunship (Chinese type 62 "Shanghai-II") which has had its 57mm gun mount removed They sit in front of the entrance to a navigable bunker which was inaccessible. Another entrance parallel was also sealed although we reached the blast door for that one The AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M111 was named after Mujo Ulqinaku, an Albanian sergeant of the Royal Albanian Navy, known for his resistance to the Italian forces during the Italian Invasion of Albania in 1939. Armed with only a machine gun, he was placed at the centre of the defense line and fought uninterruptedly until he was eventually killed by an artillery shell from an Italian warship in the last hour of the battle. He was given the People's Hero of Albania award posthumously. On board the AFD - M111 An old gun at the front You can see an active patrol boat moored up on the left of the shot Inside the AFD - M111 Communications cabin A small engine room Hatches and squat toilets Kitchen All the cabins were locked except for this one Some old military posters Back on land, this AFD S104 - Huchuan class 'motor torpedo boat' is waiting to be scrapped. Powered by Soviet-era engines, these hydrofoil-equipped boats are capable of 50 knots (93 km/h; 58 mph) and carry two torpedo tubes for torpedoes, with some known to be armed with naval mines. A few dilapidated buildings remain nearby This building to the left was manned but we were just out of view so we took a quick peek at these old military vehicles Some rusty torpedoes lay on the ground alongside one of them A couple of old trucks overgrown by vegetation above the bunker. We were aware of someone from the base heading in our direction at this point so we hopped in the car and made tracks We made it to the beach resort on the other side of the military zone where unfortunately the pigs were waiting for us. Thankfully they just grunted a bit and we were on our way ? Just in time to catch the sunset! Thanks for looking
  4. 1 point
    We all know the history of this place and with so many reports going up recently but here is a short version. Inspired by Tumbles i decided to shoot some old BW Film. History Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. Whitchurch Hospital finally closed its doors in April, 2016 and is due to be stripped down and dismantled. Thanks for looking
  5. 1 point
    According to a report in August 2018 there were 18 pubs closing in the UK every week with 476 closures in the first 6 months of that year. It's a sobering (sorry) thought for someone like me who appreciates an ale or six in a nice hostelry. There are records showing The Bridge Inn here going back to around 1875 although how far back it dates is unclear. It closed permanently in 2013 and planning permission was given for change of use. I had the feeling that work was starting on redeveloping it when I was there. The Welsh name is Tafarn Y Bont - I wouldn't say there's anything that makes it distinctly Welsh - but its a good example of a traditional British pub which still has a few old features. It was nice that it seemed pretty untouched in the years since it closed.
  6. 1 point
    Looks good! Reminds me of CWM cokeworks in Wales
  7. 1 point
    There were four different types of munitions factory: Engineering factories producing the metal casings for bombs and shells or, in some instances, producing parts, rifles, guns and tanks. Small-arms factories producing the bullet casings. (These factories were often existing engineering factories turned over to war production.) Explosive factories manufacturing various explosive agents. Filling factories to fill the bomb and shell casings with the explosives. This site produced Cordite and was chosen for its distance from German bomber bases in Europe, while having good rail networks and a rural location that provided a good supply of labour. This ROF employed circa 13000 during WW2 mainly women. The Ministry of Works built a large water abstraction and treatment plant , just to supply the plant. To connect the site to the national rail network, a large marshalling yard of 10 separate roads was constructed, and these connected to the works' internal network of rail lines. A passenger platform was built for military usage. All the cordite produced at the plant was taken by these sidings to Crewe. The site was well defended, both on the ground and from the air; several Type 22 Pillboxes and Type 24 Pillboxes and the entire site was under a mile away from RAF base, which was home to at least one fighter squadron, for defending the region's industrial assets from bomber attack.
  8. 1 point
    Yes there is a good book out called bomb girls ( got it off pirate bay) this one in Wrexham is now not much left and this site is currently up for sale
  9. 1 point
    Looks great in BW . Gonna be the next severalls this place if they don't do something with it soon
  10. 1 point
    RAF Coningsby is a partially active RAF base and was opened in 1940 as a bomber station. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find more about the history of this place. So I don't know when the abandoned part has been closed. Stupidly I had forgotten the plate of my tripod at home. That's why I had to take the photos without a tripod and with a higher ISO setting. Visited with @The_Raw and others, before we joined the "End of summer party" in September last year. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 - The_Raw's new friend 46 47 48
  11. 1 point
    History: This cokes facory was founded in 1924 by the belgium steel company cockerill, this factory made cokes for the nearby steel mill, also known as HFB. In 1994 there was an accident in this factory, this accident killed 7 workers. In 2010 the nearby blast furnace was mothballed which caused the cokes factory to be closed down. However in 2014 the steel mill was supposed to be reopened again, after these plans were announced the cokes factory was expanded, however after only 6 months the complete production for steel in that area was closed down permanently, which meant that it was abandoned after 80 years of producing cokes for the steel industry in Liege. Photos: I also made a documentary of this place (It is in dutch, but it has subtitels) Thanks for reading!
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