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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/11/2019 in all areas

  1. 1 point
    Visited here twice over the span of a week, once with the SO, and the second with mookster,Brewtal, Zotez and obscurity. It's a big place and I didn't realise how much I'd missed till the second visit! History Bulstrode house (listed grade II) lies towards the centre of the park. Rebuilt by Benjamin Ferrey 1860-2 for the twelfth Duke of Somerset, probably incorporating elements of the earlier buildings, it is a rambling, red-brick, Tudor-style building with an imposing tower over the main, north entrance and a French Renaissance-style colonnade on the south front giving access to the adjoining south terrace. The enclosed Inner Court, a service courtyard, is attached to the east side of the house, with various C20 buildings close by. Attached to the north-east corner of the house is the Outer Court, entered from the forecourt through a Gothic arch with a ducal crest in the gable, flanked by railings and brick piers with stone caps. The other three sides of this court have a Gothic loggia fronting a single-storey building; access to the Inner Court is through a gateway on the south side. In 1966, the community moved to Kent, and the property was bought by WEC International, a Christian evangelist missionary organisation who have gradually restored and improved the public parts of the house's interior. The house was put up for sale in 2016 and it's now intended to be turned into a luxury hotel. It was also used recently as a film set for the latest Johnny English film. The Explore A pretty simple one, apart from having to wade through a muddy bog in a field. The house is huge and even after a few hours I felt like I'd need a re-visit the following week to see the rest of it, especially with the snow and ice making parts like the rooftops terrifying slippery. The second visit was a lovely sunny day and much more pleasant. Unfortunately the local kids have been getting in and really smashing the place up good and proper. A real shame as its got some really nice original features. The Fire alarms still worked and these were pretty much going off 24/7, which was great to cover up the noise of us moving around inside, but also really really annoying! However Brewtal made it his personal mission to find the fuseboard and turn them off. Took him a little while but he did it! Bliss at last. When WEC International left in 2016 they stripped out pretty much everything and so a good chunk of the rooms are empty and not too interesting. However the whole lower floor/Basement level had some really nice interesting bits and the power still worked! We were doing really well until we set off some PIR alarms in one of the outbuildings while we were leaving. Whoops! Turned out to be a great explore! The Photos Externals Internals ] The clock tower mechanism which still could be operated. The Basement level. Most the lights worked!
  2. 1 point
    This doctor's office with adjoining villa has been empty for almost a quarter of a century. The last records are from 1994.
  3. 1 point
    Part II of the location.
  4. 1 point
    仁友綜合醫院/Renyou General Hospital, Jiayi Visited with Anew Calling. This is the final call of the exploring adventures, and arguably the most exciting/tense explore I've done in many many years. Very little history exists, and the articles that I've found document previous exploring adventures and idiotic ghost hunting experiences. They've also tried to keep the identity of the location secret, but lets be honest if you don't scan your own photos carefully there's always going to be something that gives it away, like patient records. Ha ha ha! All I can really ascertain is that the hospital closed to poor management practices and loss of funding (the calendar says 4th April 2008), and is now in the middle of a dispute between the hospital dean and the Jiayi government over unpaid taxes. That's pretty much all I know. The hospital itself is wide open, and ironically despite not having a single scribble of vandalism has been absolutely raped and pillaged to within an inch of its life, full to the brim with junk and debris from where either pikeys (what do the Taiwanese call the European equivalent? LOL) or the owners have torn out anything valuable. All the beds have gone, but funnily enough there is plenty of stuff like expired drugs, bed linen and hospital paraphenalia just stacked everywhere in boxes. There's no on-site security, but there's the arch nemesis of every explorer... PIRs. Two of them. We enter the building and get ready. I do a quick scan of the corridor into the hospital foyer, and can't spot them for the life of me. Yet as soon as I step in, I hear a woman's voice... 異常發生! 異常發生! 異常發生! This basically translates to English as abnormal activity detected, coming from the alarm panel. We head straight for the top floors, constantly looking out the windows for any remote response units. The door to the central part of the roof is jammed shut. Back down a floor, we happily wander up and down the corridors snapping away, we try the main roof and find the doors wide open. Walk around, then step back into the staircase... we hear voices and footsteps. Oh SHIIIIIIT! So we wait for 15-20 minutes, hiding on the roof. Ironically a place they never actually bother to check. We go back about 2-3 times and still hear them wandering around. Then the voices disappear, and we are seriously on edge. We wander up and down the hospital corridors floor by floor, finding very little of interest sadly. All is very much the same, trashed empty rooms sometimes filled with interesting (or not) junk. Expired medicine. I've never seen so much piled up in one place! Then we reach the 4th floor an hour or so later, more relaxed. But then it takes a tense turn... I look back out into the corridor and there are 2 guards looking in every room for us! We hide, and expect to be caught there and then. Literally metres away, we stand there in deathlike silence; I flick the camera onto movie mode, expecting to be caught. I suggested giving myself up, but Anew Calling disagrees. We hear them open and close doors, talking to each other. I look out again, and one of them is walking down the corridor straight towards us, but somehow he doesn't see us! They leave. Oh my fucking god, I'm absolutely shitting it now. I can't fathom how he didn't spot me. We head down a floor, into the ICU ward. It looks like a bomb has gone off in this room it's THAT trashed. Someone has literally come in here with a sledgehammer and gone riot. We think the security have gone now, so I flick the camera onto movie mode. First into the basement, it's full of more medical junk. The lower basement, which has the x-ray room, and if there is one here, the mortuary, sadly is flooded and inaccessible. Back into the foyer, and we trip the alarms again (one either side, no escape). I run around looking for interesting rooms, but there are none, so I snap one of the foyer before heading to the dispensary. No chance... 過來!Either the guard was waiting outside in his car for us or he was waiting inside a room for us, but he's nailed us. We run out straight throught the window we came in from; looking back, there he is, thinking he'd nailed us. We try running, but it's no use. He calls us back. BUSTED! So he's called back his colleague (I recognised his silhouette as the guy in the corridor), and then proceeds to call the police. Anew Calling tries to play dumb and bluff them into thinking he has a train to catch urgently (all in broken Mandarin, may I add), but they don't buy it and don't let him leave. They see right through it, and laughed! The police turn up, and it's left to me to be a translator for them because nobody speaks English at all. He just searches our bag and warns us about the dangers of the building, and how he was recently called to rescue someone who got trapped in the lift (he wasn't bluffing either; there's evidence of the door being forced!). Thankfully I spoke enough Mandarin to put them all at ease, and in turn the police and guards were super friendly and courteous to me (even if you speak A1 Mandarin, they really appreciate your efforts). Not sure they had such a good impression of ANC playing stupid though... ha! I voluntarily handed over my details, and then we were allowed on our way with a wave and good wishes for the Chinese new year. TBM wins again.
  5. 1 point
    Proper old school wooden bar Did you sample any of those spirits? Looked alreet to me
  6. 1 point
    RAF Coningsby is a partially active RAF base and was opened in 1940 as a bomber station. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find more about the history of this place. So I don't know when the abandoned part has been closed. Stupidly I had forgotten the plate of my tripod at home. That's why I had to take the photos without a tripod and with a higher ISO setting. Visited with @The_Raw and others, before we joined the "End of summer party" in September last year. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 - The_Raw's new friend 46 47 48
  7. 1 point
    I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
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