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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/13/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    The Italians don't mess around when it comes to architecture and this old sanatorium is no exception. Built in 1924 in an art deco style, it began life as a tuberculosis hospital before being converted into a generic hospital in the 1950s. In 2015 it closed down to make way for a new hospital. Most of it has been completely emptied now but the admin building and chapel are stunning regardless. The vast network of tunnels are pretty epic as well with workshops, locker rooms and some odd looking stretchers amongst other things down there. They connect every single building in the complex so you can access certain buildings that are sealed from outside. It's a big old place with a lot to see. I've been twice and still not seen it all. Wards Tunnels Admin Block The Chapel Thanks for looking
  2. 2 points
    History Agecroft was a coal fired power station which was directly fed by Agecroft Colliery located across the road. The power station consisted of 3 stations. A was opened in 1925 and had 4 Metropolitan Vickers generators putting out 57,500Kw. A video of the opening in 1925 https://www.youtube.com/embed/U6DeR6gj3Nc In 60’s the station was extended, and stations B and C were added along with another 4 generators and 4 natural draft cooling towers. Upping the stations output by 358MW these both opened in 1962. Video from 1962. https://www.youtube.com/embed/hFBSyudgfgM Phone shot of a CEGB sign we found the remains of in A matching that in the video above. Being constructed in 1924 Aerial shot of A in full swing Looking at the station from Agecroft bridge Metrovick Turbo Alternator in Agecroft A Agecroft B and C, dates unknown Agecroft B turbine hall in 1962 The updated control room for B and C in 1962 During use the station had 3 steam loco’s built in 1948 by Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns in Newcastle to shunt coal from the colliery between the stations. With the nationalisation of the UK electric industry a conveyor belt was built instead making the loco’s all but redundant. The loco’s were sold in the 80’s and Agecroft No1 can be seen at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. In 1991 Agecroft Colliery closed in March and 18 months later it was announced the power station would close in March 1993. The demolition of the cooling towers was delayed until May 1994 due to a pair of Peregrine Falcons nesting in them. The cooling towers being demo’d in 94. This is the view and a memory I had as a kid watching the demolition from the opposite bank of the Irwell in Prestwich Clough. I think the disappearance of these from the skyline I grew up seeing is probably why I get a proper woody for cooling towers. Anyway here’s a video of them being demolished. (skip to 1:05) https://www.youtube.com/embed/mS6OxiFIyeE https://www.youtube.com/embed/iL3Nns3MIeM The site was bulldozed and HMP Forest Bank was built on the site, which opened in January 2000. The Explore Now as I mentioned above I grew up a mile or two away from Agecroft and I remember going on bike rides with my old man down the clough along the banks of the Irwell seeing the cooling towers, and sadly watching them be demolished (which at the time was bloody epic) obviously now they’re quite a rare sight, especially round here. So yeah I’m rambling. Anyway basically I’ve always driven past the old site and never really given too much thought to it as there only seems to be a couple of buildings left at the front which as far as I can remember have always been offices. Well driving past a few weeks back I saw a couple of the usual security signs up and thought eh up. That has to be worth a nosey. Worth a nosey it was. With a day free I gave @bolts and @ferret a call and off we went. Now we didn’t know what to expect, maybe there was epic, maybe there was stripped out modernised offices, but you don’t know until you look. Turns out the buildings up front which were ITab are now a school. Rammed with kids of all ages playing out near where we wanted to go, but we persevered and cracked on with the task at hand. We managed to get down between a couple of buildings, and noticed some large cable runs. Similar to that of what’s left at Winnington. A few risks later and a massive shout out to @bolts for having some balls and to push us we were in the main building. After checking this out we moved onto the adjoining outbuilding where we stumbled across the control room. WIN. We checked also out a few outbuildings what I think was a pumphouse at one point which is now just empty, another small outbuilding going underground but that's flooded, and then the offices at the front which I believe were used as the CEGB training school in the 60's is now being used as a Jewish school. Where the old turbine hall for A was there is a 60's ish brick office block which was modernised inside and empty. Still a bloody top find and a great day out. Pics My photo’s are a mix of phone and DSLR So this is the first building we got into. 1st floor (phone) Main building Onto the control room. Peace out
  3. 2 points
    Originally the Sea View Hotel, Cautley House is in every way as bland and and tacky as I expected. Built in 1888, it was extended to the east in 1906, became the Seabrook Hotel in the 1960s, Alfred’s Hotel in the 1980s and then a christian healing centre in around 1994. A care home was next on the agenda once the healing centre closed in 2011/12, it didn’t happen though as the building needed updating and was deemed unfit for such use. So it’s just sat empty since, although there used to be a live-in guardian person, but with the disuse and the decay commencing over a number of years they left too. Now plans are in for demolition it’s days as any kind of establishment are numbered, probably to be replaced by the non-affordable homes that keep springing up round here. And despite being accessible in some way or another most of that time it’s pretty untrashed apart from naturally falling apart. Some history and old pics here Entrance/reception area/groud floor rooms Later extension housing the dance floor and DJ booth/sacrificial altar with added air con Main stairs up to the locally-named suites All the rooms were equally as meh, so much shades of beige in this place with 70s style avocado bathroom suites too. And balcony cat-flaps. The most fucked part was the 1906 extension Some signage and stuff There you have it, worth an hour or so if you're in the area
  4. 2 points
    After seeing Mookster's report of this site a couple of weeks ago; and it being fairly local, I decided I would check it out on my days off work. A friend of mine on Facebook whom I know through other hobbies had expressed interest in an explore with me the day before I had planned to go; so we decided that I would pick him up in the morning and we would go for the hour drive to the location. It was nice to put another face to a name who I'd spoken to for quite some time. The weather that morning had been pretty bad through and through and was forecast to only get worse, but thankfully the rain stopped; and we had a reasonable few hours of weather as we went inside the Abattoir. I had mixed feelings overall about going into the site, nothing eerie or spooky of course, I'm not a YouTuber; but of the side of meat consumption which I always try to forget about. It was pretty cold inside as expected and clinical. I'm not sure I would have wanted to work here. The site is very big and took quite a few hours to do. It was largely trashed and stripped, but the offices really redeemed the devastation downstairs and were stuffed full of things to pick and rifle through. After a very pleasant explore, we walked through the abandoned Garden Centre next door back to my car and stopped off for lunch at a Buddies USA Diner near the M1. Those of you who know me, will know what a carnivore I am, and though I wasn't particularly freaked out by the Abattoir; I certainly had a funny feeling going round in the back of my mind while eating my tasty Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich. Anglo Beef Processors, (ABP) is one of the largest meat processing companies in Europe. During the mid-2000s, production was scaled back and this site and the similar but much smaller facility in Bathgate, Scotland were closed. The facility opened under ownership of Meade Buswell in the 1960s and became Buswells of Blisworth. After a takeover in the 1970s, it became Dalgety Buswell. Later on, it came under the Anglo Beef Processors umbrella before it closure in 2004. Olleco, a cooking oil collection and recycling company operate out of a directly adjacent facility and are an associated company to ABP, which makes sense really as the facility was full of discarded oil drums, catering containers and other plastic barrels. The site was a maze of walk in fridges and freezers, and it was quite easy to get lost in them while navigating your way around. Strangely, and luckily, the site was devoid largely of crappy tags, but the natives had inevitably had their way with some of the things inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 As always guys, thanks for taking the time to read. More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706479202211
  5. 2 points
    Built circa 1880 for T & J Leigh Cotton & Wool spinning, it had 120,000 spindles in 1914. Twin six storey brick built with an ornamental engine house between. Fireproof construction and cast iron pillars between windows on the top floor. It was Grade II listed in 1975. The building has had it’s various uses over the past few decades. A large section was a furniture shop. A bed and Sofa shop. A gym, joinery workshop. Until recently where it is now currently being stripped to be converted to apartments. Been in here a few times now, when it was open for summer roof chills, and more recently now it’s stripped. I’ll keep checking on it as it’s local and I really want to see the engine house but it seems to be quite secure. Anyway it’s still a grand old mill so here’s a few pictures.
  6. 1 point
    Swan Meadow Mill was built by James Eckersley in 1827 and became Old Mill when a new, larger mill was built in 1838. It was demolished in 1960 followed in 1963 by the larger mill. James Eckersley and Sons had three four-storey mills by 1880.Musgraves of Bolton supplied a tandem compound steam engine in 1884.Eckersleys ran six spinning mills and two weaving sheds in the town, Swan Meadow Old, Swan Meadow large, Water Heyes, and Western Mills No.1, No.2 and No.3. The mills housed a total of 236,572 ring spindles, 14,554 mule spindles and 1687 loom. It's a massive complex and there just seems to be mills everywhere here. Deffo loads more to see and more look disused. We just ran out of time to check the rest out. Visited with @Ferret The damp derpier mills most recent use looks to have been a motorbike\scooter garage. The larger mill was used as a multi level go kart track and then more recently airsoft and paintball. Not a bad mill to be fair. Had a good laugh messing about on a kids go kart. The engine house is a B E A UT.
  7. 1 point
    History Beehive cotton spinning mills, comprising 2 spinning blocks with some ancillary buildings. The first mill (spinning mill No.1) was built in 1895, the second (spinning mill No.2) added in 1902. 2 spinning blocks with original offices and gate lodge, and later (c1920) office. Spinning mill No.1 is 5 storeys, with multi-ridge roof and cast-iron, steel and concrete internal structure. Brick externally. Large rectangular windows have central dividing mullions. Yellow brick bands as lintels. Stair/sprinkler tower at south-east angle raised an additional storey with high parapet. Stepped pyramidal cap now missing. Mill No.2 is similar in style, 6 storeys. Stair/sprinkler tower similar in style to that of mill No.1 at south-east angle, and additional smaller tower at north-west angle. Spinning mills are linked by loading bay, with mill name and date (1902). Engine house projects from the rear of mill No.1, and there is also a boiler house and truncated stack to rear. Several bays of single-storey, saw-tooth roofed building at front of mill No.2 - preparation or carding areas. INTERIOR: not inspected. HISTORY: documentary evidence suggests mill No.2 also formerly had engine house to centre-rear, and that there were card-room extensions to the rear of mill No.1. Explore Visited with @Ferret and @Drew howe good end to a good day having finally done St Joes earlier in the day. Just a good chilled mooch around a mahoosive set of mills, rooftop chills, winding scallies up, nearly falling into water tanks.
  8. 1 point
    A night in the Paris Metro My first report for a while and I felt that my photos from each location wouldn't create a substantial enough report. Because of this I decided to compile them into a more lengthy post documenting the night in which we explored various sections of the Paris Metro. I hope you enjoy reading my story and seeing the images I managed to capture. After arriving in Paris with @Letchbo for a short weekend break, we decided to begin our night of exploring by hitting a classic metro spot. Once we'd safely entered the area we wanted to photograph, we hid in an alcove for a short period of time. Patiently waiting for the end of service with front row seats to watch the last remaining trains hurl past us. As soon the service concluded for the night, we eagerly got our cameras out and started shooting. Fortunately we managed to grab a couple of decent photos before we heard what we presumed were track workers approaching nearby. We quickly concluded it was best to abort mission and keep moving ahead. Photographing sections of track as we progressed down the line, until we reached the next station and swiftly departed unnoticed. By the time we were back out above ground the night was still young and we headed onto our next location. View of a train passing on Line 10 The double raccord We'd visited this spot earlier in the year along with @Conrad and @DirtyJigsaw after visiting another of Paris' famous ghost stations. But when we arrived at this one, we noticed a large number workers across the tracks and decided to give it a miss. Fast forward to October, we thought try our luck again. My partner made his way over the fence but as I was about to climb in and join him, someone abruptly stopped me in my tracks. "Bonsoir!" "Bonsoir?" The rather authoritative looking chap approached me and continued speaking to me in French (to which I didn't fully understand.) I politely explained we were English. He then proceeded to pull a badge out and clearly stated to me the word every urban explorer wants to hear on a night out exploring the metro. "Police." Oh fuck. That's when we thought the night had sadly come to a prompt conclusion. Fortunately for us after a brief discussion with us claiming to be photographing the canal, he decided to allow us to resume our business and once he was well out of sight we made our way straight in. Onto a bit of history, Arsenal station was officially opened in 1906 and is located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. In addition to this, it is also situated on line 5 between the Bastille and Quai de la Rapée stations. After 33 years of operation, it was closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. This was due to French resistance members allocating the area as an ammunition depot. Once Paris had been liberated from German forces August of 1944, a battle more commonly known as Battle for Paris and Belgium. It was decided reopening Arsenal would be inefficient. This was on account of its close proximity to neighbouring stations which limited the flow of passengers. For 75 years the station has been largely abandoned aside from graffers, urban explorers, photographers and avid thrill seekers, such as ourselves. Once we'd grabbed a few shots of the abandoned Arsenal Station, we continued photographing another small section of track further down the line. It was quite photogenic and was a welcomed bonus to what had already been a predominately successful night for the both of us. Before long the morning was fast approaching, coinciding with the threat of the service resuming. We reluctantly called it a night, making our way out and back to our accommodation, covered in metro dust and feeling pretty relieved we managed to pull it all off after a few close encounters. As always if you got this far, thanks for reading
  9. 1 point
    In a small Belgian village is this house on the roadside. There are still a few things that are worth being photographed. In the meantime it should not look like the pictures anymore .
  10. 1 point
    History The Art Deco cinema was designed for the Union Cinema Circuit by renowned architects Verity and Beverley. It opened on 23rd July 1937 but was shortly taken over by ABC (Associated British Cinemas) in October that year. It became a Ritz in the 60’s and was used as a cinema up until it’s closure on 18th June 1984 when it was taken over as a bingo hall until that then closed in 2008. Grade II listed due to it’s highly decorative interior of an Art Deco, Neo-Egyptian and Chinoiserie inspired decoration. Which of very few survive now. Here’s a pretty cool video I’ve linked from Youtube with some cracking old images of the place along with a recording of the Compton Organ being played there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Ej2LEqDEQ Our Visit I’d seen @AndyK and @Spidermonkey had been here a few weeks back, followed by @dweebs report also, so with the 28 meet being in Brum it was the perfect opportunity to get over and have a look. Pretty straight forward as it seems it had quite a bit of traffic earlier in the week to which I noticed the lights were on. Which is ideal as it’s a pain in the arse light painting these massive auditoriums. Visited with @ferret, @drew howe and @slayaaa. Not too much left from it’s cinema days but still a good un non the less. Pics I’ve included a couple of old photos dragged up from Google and a couple of screengrabs of the above mentioned video for comparison. Starting with some externals Foyer Moving onto the auditorium Some old graffiti behind the stage/screen area A lot of money for it’s day this, and still now to be fair. I certainly wouldn’t mind winning that. Original seating, covered in cobwebs. and to finish on “The shot”
  11. 1 point
    Interesting place, beautiful decay. I also like the old tiles / bricks.
  12. 1 point
    Nice job! I particularly like the night shots with the windows from inside.
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    Loving yer mills aren't ya mate. That tiling at the end makes this one 😍
  15. 1 point
    Looks like a banging chill spot that mate. See you managed to sneak your car into shot as well haha
  16. 1 point
    Nice one. Looks in pretty decent nick that. These pics look far better on a large screen than the teeny ones btw
  17. 1 point
    Wow, now that's quite some control room, really early adoption of the idea of centralised controls there.
  18. 1 point
    Reals good Location and nice pics
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    Here's a pic of the control room around it's opening time in the 20's if anyone is interested. Forgot to include it in my report. DOH
  21. 1 point
    Great pics. I will be there at the end of May.
  22. 1 point
    There's still a few about, obviously nowhere near as many as there was though, but still a few. It's mad some places you go and you can see 3/4 former theatres all within a few hundred yards of eachother. All of different sizes, and level of glam but most converted to furniture shops lol but yeah it's a shame when ones like this get left to just deteriorate to the point of no return. Thanks, it's always a bit of a pain in the arse with the garish colour schemes in these places, and with the lighting.....when it works
  23. 1 point
    There is some crackers among that lot @Andy brilliant shots too
  24. 1 point
    History This coal mine was established in 1910 and was funded by the Prussian empire. This facility contained two elevator towers. In 1912 the construction began on a cokes plant right next to the coal mine. In 1943 the mine shut down due to the second world war, after 6 years the mine reopened again. With this reopening there was also a major renovation, with this renovation there was a larger modern elevator added to the facility. In 1998 the facility was bought by a big coal mining corporation which owned 5 other coal mines. In 2008 the 98 year old coal mining facility was closed down by the government. The historic part is currently being restored and the part that was renovated after the war will probably be torn down. Explore when we got in we first went trough a whole system with conveyer belts, after that we ended up in the huge coal washery. after we explored this part we went up into the elevator tower. The tower was 10 floors high so we were quite tired then we were on the tower but it was really worth it, in the tower there was an enormous electrical lift motor which was really nice to take pictures from. It was a really cool place to explore, I really enjoyed it! I also made a documentary about this place, the video is down below this post (it is in Dutch, but it has english subtitles) Here is the video i made on this place
  25. 0 points
    I once did a shift for abp when I was about 16. The agency told me the job was 'loading', and when I asked 'loading what?' they said boxes of packaged meat onto the back of a lorry. It fucking well wasn't! It was loading cow carcasses with a psycho of a boss swearing at us constantly. Lasted about 2 hours and then quit. Horrible places!
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