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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/25/2019 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    I have never been happy with the results of my expolration but nevertheless it was one of my absolute favorites. This outstanding piece of Brutalism architecture placed in the phenomenal surrounding of the beautiful historical city. PORN!
  2. 5 points
    Once in a while a house appears that is just something else and this house was one of those. Visited with Ninja Kitten one cold November day. I know a lot of history to this house but will hold it back to protect the house. Giving too much detail of its history along with names would compromise it. The photographs can speak for themselves. A veritable feast of dusty vintage artefacts locked in another time. The bedroom pictured here looked as if it had remained as it was when the very young soldier perished in WW1. An organic museum if ever there was one in existence. A museum to a fallen soldier. Hope you enjoy
  3. 4 points
    Visited this location 2015: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  4. 4 points
    I think everybody knows about this area and must not say much about it. We where there for 3 days in February and it was amazing. Enjoy the pics.
  5. 4 points
    A former childrens home part of the Operational Pallial sexual abuse investigation and latterly a residential home for the elderly; the access points to the main building have recently been glued and screwed; still a good mooch round the other buildings
  6. 3 points
    In the 1950s, this cinema, with its 1,000 seats, was one of the largest in Germany. It has been over 100 years since the cinema opened. Now it has not been used as a cinema for nearly 30 years. Then the lower area was rebuilt and still used as a disco. But that too has been several years now.
  7. 3 points
    I had an awesome time here, it's a huge abandoned factory It's still guarded, but easy to visit .. I've spend a lot of time inside and a local person also told us about the history of the place. His family didn't have any hot water, so when he was a child , his mother used to take him to the factory to give him a bath .
  8. 2 points
    History "Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with a demolition order which was denied but as recently been re-submitted with agreed amendments." Visited with @EOA and @Ferret bumped into @little_ boy_explores on the way out too. Quite a relaxed one, heard stories of dogs but nothing to be seen. The alarm wasn't on when we went but it was when I popped back. Pot luck with this one I think. It has a bit of everything though so although it's been hammered it's deffo worth a look in. Pics
  9. 2 points
    Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
  10. 2 points
    Another weekend, another backlog! I really need to streamline my reporting process! Part of a little day out with Mookster back before Christmas, we did this Tourist Trail steelworks; and it was a rather nice morning out; albeit a little smashed inside. The works were originally established in 1855 with an office staff of four, three small furnaces, a small foundry; plus iron fields at Stanton and in the neighbourhood parish of Dale Abbey, and the Ironstone Bell pits at Babbington. Messrs George and John Crompton; the three founders; were brothers and partners in the firm of bankers of Crompton and Evans - Mr Newton and Mr. Barber. In the infant years; the pig iron was made entirely from local ore, but in 1865 Northamptonshire ores were introduced into the mixtures; with iron mines in Leceistershire and Northamptonshire acquired and developed. In 1878 the pipe foundry, now potentially the largest in Great Britain, and possibly the world, was started under the management of Mr James Chambers. Circa 1914; the company had 7000 people on its pay roll - 3000 here at Stanton, the same number at the collieries and 1000 at the ironstone mines. In 1951 it was nationalised and became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. A takeover in 1960 by Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd happened. and was merged with Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. to form the Stanton & Staveley company. In 1967 Stanton & Staveley was incorporated into British Steel. During the early 1980s the Stanton site became part of the French Pont-a-Mouson Group and later part of Saint Gobain, manufacturing cast iron pipes. Production finally ceased on May 24th 2007, and subsequently a huge amount of the site was demolished around 2009/2010. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678405612458
  11. 2 points
    A rather apt explore after exploring an Iron Works earlier in the morning! After Stanton, Mookster and I headed for this little industrial Gem and met Mattdonut and James Smith inside. It was a bit of a trek through some undergrowth and tumbledown sheds full of all the old moulds and casts; but it was well worth it. The original company at this premises began manufacturing cast iron pipes back in the 1940s. By the 1980s; there was a management buy out and the company was renamed. It then closed again around two decades later and again; changed hands and was renamed; remaining in operation until it closed for the final time a few years ago. The whole site is split in two by a lovely iron railway bridge with the casting storage sheds and workshops on one side and the main foundry building on the other side of the bridge. It was a lovely treasure trove of an explore with plenty to see inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 Thanks For Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706470238285
  12. 1 point
    So yeah, this ones been done to death but hell its worth the many miles out to see it! picked up by my good friend SX-Riffraff in the early hours one morn and made off.... stopped at a morrisons to pick up the reduced splore goodies and found somewhere to park ...... which was a bit awkward as most places had metal poles and barriers because of the up-coming Air-show, but this did mean we got a Sneak preview as some of the jets where doing barrel rolls across pyestock :popcorn Anywayyyyyy we found ourselves inside and ducking behind pipes to avoid patrols, Overal a good day with a few close secca situations, i wont put any history as im sure most of you know what this place is by now Right, Pictures!
  13. 1 point
    大家好! My oh my, how long has it been since I posted a report? Exploring has become a low priority for me ever since I left the UK, even if I've always kept tabs on new sites shared here and on social media. Truth be told learning Mandarin and my lady have taken a much bigger priority in recent years, plus my lady is no fan of me going about it alone so that makes organising jaunts more challenging. I have visited a fair few sites around Taiwan, but compared to Europe there is so little here to get me to jump on the next train there because beautiful architecture is just so rare and even noteworthy industrial sites are few and far between; many places are just rotting concrete shells. So this report here is meant to be a compilation of my latest explores to date which I feel don't have enough bite to warrant standalone reports. There will be more reports to come in the future, but since I left my torch and tripod in England it will be some time before I visit these. I trust the results will not be disappointing though. 亞哥花園/Encore Garden, July 2018 Visited with some colleagues and non-explorers. I'd always been aware of this one, as it's situated close to my favourite hiking trails just outside of Taizhong where I live. But being me I never made a move until last year. It's an abandoned theme park in Dakeng district, opened in 1981 and was a hugely popular site that attracted around 1m people a year. Like several sites in Taiwan it was hit by the 921 earthquake in 1999 which severely damaged the area, causing attendance to drop dramatically. Eventually the financial losses incurred forced the place to close in 2008. On most days there is a security guard with dogs at the top of the site, living in a shack. However as of last year the entire site has been repurposed as a rally racetrack. Pay $100 (that's £2.50) to enter and you can sit back and spectate, but before that we chose to explore the park first. Initially we were in full stealth mode, when we spotted people in hi vis vests dotted around the site as well as the guard's dogs barking at us, but after seeing others drive round with their scooters we realised it was a free for all for today. What I found really fascinating about exploring in Taiwan compared to Europe and other places is how the fertile, humid tropical enviroment is far more hostile to built structures which means nature takes over rapidly once the place is abandoned; the restaurant was completely covered in thick, thick dust, and other structures had started to be completely invaded by tree branches. Old arcade machines left behind Because of thick shrub finding the entrance to this ride took a bit of careful searching, but we got to it. It turns out as long as we stayed off the roads as much as possible, we were at free to roam whenever we wanted. The racing stewards didn't mind us at all. Unfortunately the outdoor auditorium was inaccessible because there were too many race cars on the route leading up to it. Another thing that's incredibly striking about Taiwan and nature is the frequency of earthquake tremors. In my experience they seem to hit every few months, and in mountainous and rural areas can trigger minor (or major) landslides; look at the next 2 pictures and compare to older photos... By stark contrast to the western world, obviously with a few exceptions Asians and the Taiwanese have utmost respect for abandoned sites. Whether this be rooted in a fear of the supernatural (people in the west believe in ghosts, but superstitions are taken far more seriously here), they treat abandoned sites as tombs and relics of the past to be treated with respect. It's because of this, little if any effort is made to seal any buildings from intruders and yet sites see so little vandalism. Security guards are rare, too. Another thing is that for several sites upon closure and abandonment the owners do not bother to remove items from buildings, regardless of their value. The fundamental exception to this rule being statues and religious iconography, because to leave these to rot is to bring huge misfortune on one's life. So although decent sites are indeed rare, exploring those that are around are unique experiences in which you can really lose yourself and let your imagination run free. I then made my way inside the buildings in the middle of the site, and was stunned to find the power still on. It turns out even on a Sunday there were workers inside. Unfortunately the site manager walked in, then politely asked me to leave after this photo was taken. It's far from epic, but it's well worth sharing as it's so vastly different from Crapalot. I'm still alive by the way... Thank you so much for reading, and it's a real pleasure to be back. TBM x
  14. 1 point
    Closed due to two local schools merging and getting a newly built school to move into Planning permission has been given to demolish the site and build houses Visited with the elusive , and thanks for the tipoff K On with the snaps thanks for looking
  15. 1 point
    Tkvarcelli was an important coal mining town in the war torn region of Abkhazia, a de facto independent republic which remains internationally recognised as part of Georgia. During the Abkhazian war (from 1992 to 93), Tkvarcheli withstood, through Russian humanitarian and military aid, an uneasy siege by the Georgian forces. As a result of the war the town's industries all but stopped and its population has since decreased from approximately 22,000 to just 5,000 people. Abkhazia is on the list of places where the FCO (Foreign & Commonwealth Office) advises against all travel. There is no UK consulate support if anything goes wrong so if you were to lose your passport for example, you'd be pretty fucked. With that in mind, and having read a few horror stories of tourists being aggressively robbed around Tkvarcelli, we were pretty skeptical about coming here. Thanks to some advice from @Olkka, who visited earlier in the year, we chose to hire a driver who knew the area well and we didn't encounter any problems. Top tip of the day - take a bottle of vodka for the guys demolishing the power plant and you'll be reet. Tkvarcelli power plant has seen better days. On the upper levels there were holes in the floor everywhere, hidden by overgrown plants and moss. We tried to be extra careful although it was difficult to tell if any structure we were standing on was safe. There were workers actively demolishing the roof above one end of the plant as well so we had to stick to the opposite end. Thankfully that's where all the good stuff was. The only other obstacle was the squatters but they didn't seem to mind us being there. Workers were sporadically dropping huge sections of roof onto the ground from above Much has been dismantled The Squatters Manoeuvring around this building was so sketchy These stairs were clinging on by dear life. We went up these but the stairs above were completely mangled Nope Coal conveyor chute Control Room. Pretty battered but I loved it in here The central turbine. I may have got a bit carried away photographing this. It would be amazing to have seen this in its hey day. Akarmara was a nearby mining town. Wars and economic change have emptied the town of the 5,000 people who lived there in the 1970s leaving it pretty much a ghost town. Now it is estimated only 35 people remain. It's completely cut off except for a rocky road full of potholes that takes around an hour to navigate. On our arrival we were greeted by some strange looks from the elderly locals, although the local children seemed fascinated by us and one accompanied us for our whole time there. It's a very surreal place where buildings that have a light outside signify that they are lived in. This is to ward off any looters. None of the buildings look lived in otherwise as they are all falling apart. The train station has been completely reclaimed by the forest. This building was completely trashed except for one flat in the middle inhabited by a young family. Thanks for looking.
  16. 1 point
    Like this matey. Some good shots and nice machines.. Thanks for posting
  17. 1 point
    Oh my word that is absolutely amazing, A true time capsule, a very rare thing indeed!
  18. 1 point
    Still a lot of things inside, that's great. I especially like the detail shots.
  19. 1 point
    The end was nigh for Mookster and my North Midlands Roadtrip back before Christmas. Mookster remembered seeing this site when visiting the Crich Tramway Museum in the 1990s and had made it a goal to visit it when he discovered it had not been demolished, he previously thought it had. We parked in the Museum and walked up the driveway to the site. An older chap and some friends who frequent the site and had keys, had been feeding the birds and we exchanged some pleasantries; "As long as your not smashing anything, go for it"; was the general opinion; so we filled our boots. Sadly; much is inaccessible due to flooding; and it is overall, pretty trashed, but it had some great photo ops! I enjoyed it, and the lighting the evening was producing. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678698751578
  20. 1 point
    Great set of images James
  21. 1 point
    Lovely stuff as always! Really liking some of those old photographs
  22. 1 point
    Yes. I completed the date.
  23. 1 point
    Looks like there's still plenty of stuff to have a rummage through
  24. 1 point
    Great to see you as always Tom; looks like you are your good old self over there and that great . It's nice to see proper decay for once; not like our soggy derps; these seem to stand the test of time much better! Hope to see you soon
  25. 1 point
    仁友綜合醫院/Renyou General Hospital, Jiayi Visited with Anew Calling. This is the final call of the exploring adventures, and arguably the most exciting/tense explore I've done in many many years. Very little history exists, and the articles that I've found document previous exploring adventures and idiotic ghost hunting experiences. They've also tried to keep the identity of the location secret, but lets be honest if you don't scan your own photos carefully there's always going to be something that gives it away, like patient records. Ha ha ha! All I can really ascertain is that the hospital closed to poor management practices and loss of funding (the calendar says 4th April 2008), and is now in the middle of a dispute between the hospital dean and the Jiayi government over unpaid taxes. That's pretty much all I know. The hospital itself is wide open, and ironically despite not having a single scribble of vandalism has been absolutely raped and pillaged to within an inch of its life, full to the brim with junk and debris from where either pikeys (what do the Taiwanese call the European equivalent? LOL) or the owners have torn out anything valuable. All the beds have gone, but funnily enough there is plenty of stuff like expired drugs, bed linen and hospital paraphenalia just stacked everywhere in boxes. There's no on-site security, but there's the arch nemesis of every explorer... PIRs. Two of them. We enter the building and get ready. I do a quick scan of the corridor into the hospital foyer, and can't spot them for the life of me. Yet as soon as I step in, I hear a woman's voice... 異常發生! 異常發生! 異常發生! This basically translates to English as abnormal activity detected, coming from the alarm panel. We head straight for the top floors, constantly looking out the windows for any remote response units. The door to the central part of the roof is jammed shut. Back down a floor, we happily wander up and down the corridors snapping away, we try the main roof and find the doors wide open. Walk around, then step back into the staircase... we hear voices and footsteps. Oh SHIIIIIIT! So we wait for 15-20 minutes, hiding on the roof. Ironically a place they never actually bother to check. We go back about 2-3 times and still hear them wandering around. Then the voices disappear, and we are seriously on edge. We wander up and down the hospital corridors floor by floor, finding very little of interest sadly. All is very much the same, trashed empty rooms sometimes filled with interesting (or not) junk. Expired medicine. I've never seen so much piled up in one place! Then we reach the 4th floor an hour or so later, more relaxed. But then it takes a tense turn... I look back out into the corridor and there are 2 guards looking in every room for us! We hide, and expect to be caught there and then. Literally metres away, we stand there in deathlike silence; I flick the camera onto movie mode, expecting to be caught. I suggested giving myself up, but Anew Calling disagrees. We hear them open and close doors, talking to each other. I look out again, and one of them is walking down the corridor straight towards us, but somehow he doesn't see us! They leave. Oh my fucking god, I'm absolutely shitting it now. I can't fathom how he didn't spot me. We head down a floor, into the ICU ward. It looks like a bomb has gone off in this room it's THAT trashed. Someone has literally come in here with a sledgehammer and gone riot. We think the security have gone now, so I flick the camera onto movie mode. First into the basement, it's full of more medical junk. The lower basement, which has the x-ray room, and if there is one here, the mortuary, sadly is flooded and inaccessible. Back into the foyer, and we trip the alarms again (one either side, no escape). I run around looking for interesting rooms, but there are none, so I snap one of the foyer before heading to the dispensary. No chance... 過來!Either the guard was waiting outside in his car for us or he was waiting inside a room for us, but he's nailed us. We run out straight throught the window we came in from; looking back, there he is, thinking he'd nailed us. We try running, but it's no use. He calls us back. BUSTED! So he's called back his colleague (I recognised his silhouette as the guy in the corridor), and then proceeds to call the police. Anew Calling tries to play dumb and bluff them into thinking he has a train to catch urgently (all in broken Mandarin, may I add), but they don't buy it and don't let him leave. They see right through it, and laughed! The police turn up, and it's left to me to be a translator for them because nobody speaks English at all. He just searches our bag and warns us about the dangers of the building, and how he was recently called to rescue someone who got trapped in the lift (he wasn't bluffing either; there's evidence of the door being forced!). Thankfully I spoke enough Mandarin to put them all at ease, and in turn the police and guards were super friendly and courteous to me (even if you speak A1 Mandarin, they really appreciate your efforts). Not sure they had such a good impression of ANC playing stupid though... ha! I voluntarily handed over my details, and then we were allowed on our way with a wave and good wishes for the Chinese new year. TBM wins again.
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