Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/19/2018 in Posts

  1. 9 points
    A n abandoned hospital that did not meet the new norms. It took some effort to gain access to this one. I did this one alone so my senses were working overtime. First thing I heard was the tik tak of some mechanical clocks so i named this one l'hopital tiktak. Electricity is still on, sensors of the automatic doors and lights still working. Went to a great part of this massive hospital but still not seen everything because I was expecting security tu turn op any moment so after less then 1h30 I went back home. Maybe I'll revisit this one soon for the other parts. Missed the morgue. Hope you enjoy this. 1 going up IMG_3506-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 go into the light IMG_3503-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 where is the lab result? IMG_3509-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 working in the sunshine IMG_3510-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 lay down your head IMG_3500-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 at an angle IMG_3497-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 flashing re light IMG_3496-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 OK 1 start the timer IMG_3493-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 take a rest IMG_3488-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 backache IMG_3466-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 the underground IMG_3463-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 spare material room IMG_3461-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 13 ok2 also in the race IMG_3471-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  2. 8 points
    History In 1919 Leeds Corporation rented Meanwood Park to provide a ‘colony’ for the mentally handicapped, which was formally opened on 3rd June 1920, although the first patient had been admitted in the previous year. In 1921 the Corporation bought Meanwood Park estate and surrounding land totalling in all one hundred and seventy eight acres, from Sir Hickman Beckett Bacon of Thonock, Gainsborough, grandson of Sir Thomas Beckett. Originally 87 patients were accommodated in the Hall, but during the following twenty years villas were built in the grounds and by 1941, beds were provided for 841 patients. The Hall by then referred to as ‘The Mansion’ was used for other hospital purposes. MPH was taken over by the NHS in 1948 and administered by Leeds. It is now the responsibility of the Leeds Eastern Health Authority and accommodates about 460 residents. The hospital was controlled by Leeds Corporation. The Hospital trained nurses in a room in the children’s school. Male nurses lived on the wards, on the farm or male hostel. No meals or catering facilities were provided for non resident staff. In 1946 some villas were used by the military for convalescent cases. Most of the Villas were locked. No child under 14 was allowed to visit. Relatives and friends were allowed to visit once a month. Patient’s mail was censored in the Chief Male Nurses office. The CMN was Mr Parson’s. One free stamp a month was issued to patients. Many of the patients at that time were literate. If they behaved they were given a pass which allowed them a few hours weekend parole. Passes were signed by the Medical Superintendent. Patients were awarded 6d per week or a bar of chocolate. The Chief Male Nurse and the Matron were paid on the number of beds. They had their own sides of the hospital, male and female patients mixed only at dances and church services. A few historical photo's I found online Visit I visited with @hamtagger at the beginning of December. i'd seen this pop up online and quite liked the look of it. Now I will say, there really isn't much to see at all but I was really happy with the place. The decay was nice and mature, had some nice features reminiscent of its times. The whole place is surrounded by a newly built residential estate with the closest house literally 75 years away from the Hall itself and its like this all around. we had quite a nice leisurely paced explore round it, a really random room in the middle of the place with really modern furniture which threw us a little bit. The explore became a bit smelly about 3/4 of the way through when @hamtagger decided he needed a shit. I'm pretty sure he even killed a few pigeons with the stench! now you'd think that with a nice airy building the smell would disappear quite quickly and I'm not one to be bothered much by smells but even I was heaving. So, apologies to future explorers although I'm sure its safe now! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
  3. 6 points
    I think ill just let the pics do the talking as im lost for words on this one , ... visted with the elusive and adam plenty of battery operated adult content , you have been warned lol thanks for looking
  4. 6 points
    We visited this italian monastery this year. It' seems to be a peaceful place so we decided to sleep there (inside the car) . It's build on a hill with a nice view, also at night. Everything is open and it looks like that it's absolutely o.k. to visit it cause also normal italien people come to visit it. We were pretty lucky with the weather this morning with much of mist. There is a huge roof terrace where I used my drone to make some pictures and videos. Sadly I lost my drone on this italy trip so I can't show You the stuff I made from bird's eye view. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  5. 3 points
    This is the railway cemetary of Hungary, once honored, powerful machines now forgotten in the mud and dirt. Rust in peace!
  6. 3 points
    The rehab center consists of several buildings in very different state of preservation. While some rooms of the spa hotel still look almost as good as new, an outbuilding (possibly former apartments of employees) is already partially collapsing. Unfortunately I don't know anything about the history. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  7. 3 points
    This hospital once was the biggest in the region, but since decades its empty, getting near to collapse. Location: Tatabánya, Hungary
  8. 3 points
    I have sat on this one for a fair while.earlier in the year I made quite a lot of trips here trying to find various bits of it.I had been on a visit here years ago and saw some bits,but I knew there was so much more to it.being near to me it was essy to go regularly to check it out.there is security on the site and cameras.so you just have to be a bit careful.Coltishall is now used as an industrial estate with many old buildings in use.it started off as battle of Britain fighter base during the second world war.fighter planes off various sorts were flown from here including hurricanes and spitfires.after the war it was used heavily in the cold war and was designated as a V bomber dispersal site.basically a back up airfield if the aircrafts hme airfield was damaged.the last planes to be based here was the jaguar jets.these saw service in the first gulf war.with the introduction of the euro fighter Coltishall was deemed none essential and so the station closed in 2006.it was a big question what was going to happen to the site.then Norfolk county council stepped in and bought it and this raised a few eyebrows.there track record is not great. SERGEANTS MESS I have visited the officers mess a few times meeting up with pretty vacant and JSP o one time as they visited too.the sergeants mess though is like the officers mess but not so grand.here the NCO's could relax and unwind,there was accommodation provided on the wings and a new block added. The more modern accommodation blocks. RECREATION As usual with the armed forces recreation is a big factor.on coltishall there was a pool,gym and five aside football plus fields for grass sports.sadly the gym is a no go now. BATTERY MAINTENANCE This building was for storage off batteries for planes and veichles.jet planes carry some hefty batteries so a place was needed to store them safely,also there was a bit at the front for testing and draining the batteries.it had a morgue feel to it and now known as the battery morgue. BOMB STORES AND FUEL A different way in was needed to do these as they are a fair way from the main site.and with CCTV covering the way down I did not want to get caught in the open.like most airfields the bomb stores are located a fair way from the main base for safety.and near to where they would take off.here there was a large building for testing the bombs and making sure they were safe.nearby is the fuel stores.not sure if these were for the planes or not. Fuelling depot HANGAR AS per standard there are four hangars here.several are in use.most of the maintenance work on the planes went on in here.to the sides there is offices and canteen areas.there was seriously nice airmans graffiti in here. JET TESTING With the advancement of jet engines on planes there was a need to test the engines.coltishall had two testing parts,an indoor and an outdoor one.the out door one allowed the planes to back up to the exhaust duct and fire up its engines which would then be passed through the exhaust duct and through the chambers.the test bay is surrounded by thick concrete blast walls. The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process. The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process. Thank you for looking.I did take lots more photos here but I could be forever on this post .with more smaller buildings.
  9. 3 points
    Hi Wicked Sunday! HERE, I already gave you some tips on how to search successfully, respectively how I search. Honestly, I don't know what else I could advise you otherwise. You don't live very far from Belgium. There is a very big and active UE-scene there, and in BE are also hundreds of abandoned places. So it shouldn't be too difficult to make contacts there and / or to find abandoned places in BE. The web is full of it; sometimes even with quite helpful descriptions or information, that can be used to find the places with a little search. And regarding the sorting: Why should the places be sorted by country? After all, Oblivion State is NOT primarily a forum to find places, but a community, to SHOW photos & reports of visited places (of course, too, to view and comment on others' pics and posts, etc.). In this regard, each has their own preferences and interests. And these usually don't refer to where a place is, but ordinarily based on, what kind of an abandoned place it is (some prefer castles or villas, other industries, others mines, bunkers and caves and so on). Concerning this personal likes, many look specifically at relevant albums and posts. For this reason, the deliberate chosen categorization here by the kind of places is expedient, and it will hardly be changed into a sorting by countries, I think. At least that's my opinion.
  10. 2 points
    The first attempt to visit it was exactly three years ago. However, I didn't feel very well at this time, so I went back to the car after half the way. Not a bad decision, because The_Raw and the others failed then. Now the second attempt, this time with more luck. A really great and impressive building! Visited with @The_Raw & @Miss.Anthrope. History (taken from The_Raw) The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
  11. 2 points
    Situated below the mountain of Arenig Fawr sits this cottage not much inside unfortunately. Visited here on Christmas Day. Video here ...https://youtu.be/q3OdocgXOYY
  12. 2 points
    In a very small French village stands this impressive house. Totally free from vandalism and with a bit of natural decay. In the past, a professor used to live there, which explains all the utensils.
  13. 2 points
    From the outside it was obvious that the building was abandoned. Next door, children were playing in the yard of the adjacent school, while we entered the former residence through an open door. Some parts of the villa were already very ruinous or even collapsed, but the beautiful wall and ceiling paintings were fortunately largely still preserved. I thought I'd already posted this house in the forum. But I was obviously mistaken, because I couldn't find it here. Apparently I'm getting old and confused ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  14. 2 points
    Thanks. Indeed still quite clean but abandoned for sure. And probably it will stay so until the building will be demolished. Same story as with the hospital I visited last year (l'hopital demi). It's now a pile of rubble,and new buildings are constructed now. No time for some real decay.
  15. 2 points
    The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  16. 2 points
    Here now the last pics from this location.
  17. 2 points
    Fucking love this! Those plants growing all over the engine, so cool. We have added Hungary to the list of countries so you don't need to select 'other' any more
  18. 1 point
    Not a bad little mooch this one. Quite a lot of area to cover with most of it being stripped unfortunately but, there is still stuff to see and some nice decay in parts. It seems the building was used to make carpet underlay form 2002 until 2013. I guess its been abandoned since then. Visited with non member Paul. History The Arrol-Johnston Motor Co., which had been in operation since 1896, opened its Dumfries factory at Heathhall in July 1913. The manager, Thomas Charles Pullinger, had been inspired by the Albert Kahn designed factories of Henry Ford in America. Kahn provided the design for the Dumfries factory, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to Ford's Highland Park factory in Detroit. The Heathhall factory was said to be the most advanced light engineering factory of its day in Scotland. The site was purchased by the North British Rubber Company in 1946. It then became Uniroyal Ltd in the 60's, and in 1987 changed yet again to the British subsidiary of the Gates Rubber Company. It has been known as Interfloor since 2002. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
  19. 1 point
    A location I did on my own . After a nice walk I reached the site. Some parts of there seems still t be in use. One building had some new looking alarms and no windows were damaged. First building I tried seems lead to nothing. Walked in a cellar with still a lot of cables, a new looking fusebox and no trash. There was no way to go further up so I tried the other buildings. Still needed to do some climbing but then the explore could start. It looked like a small coal mine the closes a few decades ago. Spent there a few hours. At one moment there was a car going over the terrain. Not sure if it was security or not but I waited hidden in a dark corner of the building for some time. Nothing happened and I started going to the exit. Hope you enjoy the picture. 1 I was hooked IMG_2740-Pano-Edit-2 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 spin that wheel IMG_2939 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 total control IMG_2929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 the curtains closed for this mine IMG_2924 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 no errors IMG_2897-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 to much tension IMG_2888 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 gear up IMG_2852-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 spin me arround IMG_2829-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 puch it IMG_2798-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 goodbye IMG_2844-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  20. 1 point
    Had a look in here earlier in the year after an fail near by. A grand example of dereliction on the outside and a crumbing mess on the inside. Nice little wander as it turned out. There is enough features and bits still knocking about to make it interesting and I enjoyed having a look around and getting some snaps. Visited with non member Paul. History The Crown opened in 1899 as the Lyceum Theatre. The intention was to provide a luxury theatre for Shakespeare productions and drama as well as revue. It is a landmark building in the town of Eccles in a vaguely Elizabethan Style with pilasters and mullioned windows. The facade is constructed of moulded red brick of five storeys with terracotta dressings to three high arched windows at first floor. It is richly decorated, and has an asymmetrically placed short corner tower. This once had a pyramidal roof and the parapet was topped with square pinnacles. The cast iron copy still survives, now encased. The auditorium was designed with three balconies, supported by four columns. The ornamentation of the proscenium comprised an allegorical representation of Shakespeare's 'Seven Ages of Man'. The act drop was a facsimile of Beverley's noted work for the opening of the Theatre Royal (Manchester) in 1845 - a Grecian subject painted by Mr Keith. Becoming a cinema in 1932, it was later adapted for Cinemascope, ending stage use. Converted for bingo in 1963, by the late 1980s it was reported to be falling into disrepair internally. The exterior is largely intact, apart from the stage house which has been partly demolished. Planning permission was given in 2005 - and again in 2008 - for partial demolition (retaining the facade) and development of apartments behind. Since then the building has become more dilapidated and a new planning application for a residential and retail development submitted in 2016 proposes complete demolition of the theatre. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157693704356862/with/42124774351/
  21. 1 point
    Creepy editing, works good with this place and nice to see that most is still in this good condition.
  22. 1 point
    Really nice place! You have captured the melancholy tristesse of the atmosphere very well. It looks awesome!
  23. 1 point
    Whilst in Leeds with @Hydro3xploric and @Butters we came across a old office building which had recently been kitted out with a full set of scaffolding due to a cool £1.5m investment by JM Construction who intend on converting the vacant 5 storey city center office building into 60 residential 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Spotting a alarm box flashing at the bottom we chanced it and a few minutes later we was staring at the skyline of central Leeds from a perspective we hadn't seen before. I don't know what it is about city's and rooftops but they are always brilliant places to sit back and chill for a moment or two. The building joined onto this is Called Crispin Lofts and is apparently partially owned by Mel B! I wanted to try getting around to the front but this meant sneaking by a living room window and not wanting to disrupt Scary Spice I grabbed a quick one and retreated External grabbed from google (Crispin Lofts on the left and the roof we was on to the right) And a few more from a roof we spotted just over the road ] Cheers for looking
  24. 1 point
    Thanks! Indeed, I found the place by myself. More specifically: already last year, I saw pictures of the place online. This publication included a (although only very vague) description of the area / region and an outdoor shot of this place. With these few clues I searched via Google Earth and Streetview. Granted, it took a quite long time before I finally found it. But my ambition was aroused, and then I just can't rest or stop, until I succeed. For the hobby, I really search a lot on the web and on maps for abandoned places, and often for a very long time, too. But I enjoy it when I have the time for it (anyway, much more than just lazily asking for a location). And admittedly, I'm also a little proud every time I succeed.
  25. 1 point
    I'd actually never been through them until now, I did get a few good ones as it happens. Cheers for the reminder, it's only taken me 4 years Also saw these nice murals
  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?

    Sign Up
×