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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/07/2018 in Posts

  1. 5 points
    Unfortunately, I don't know anything about the history of this former cinema. Access was very easy. Inside, there were a few nice things left. And a poor, mummified cat. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  2. 4 points
    A very strange house of an artist or similar. Very overgrown, in the middle of a small forest. Inhabited by at least 10,000 bloodthirsty mosquitoes ...! Unfortunately, some of the ornate statues have been destroyed in recent months. Inside it was quite dark, so I lit the photos with a torch. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  3. 2 points
    Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd was the largest film production company of Hong Kong. In 1925, three Shaw brothers - Runje, Runme, and Runde - founded Tianyi Film Company (also called Unique) in Shanghai, and established a film distribution base in Singapore, where Runme and the youngest brother, Run Run Shaw, managed the precursor to the parent company, the Shaw Organisation. In 1957, Run Run Shaw moved to Hong Kong, set up a new company called Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Ltd, and built a new studio at Clearwater Bay, which officially opened in 1961 as Movietown. In the mid-1960s, Movietown was the largest and best-equipped studio in Chinese filmmaking as well as the largest privately owned studio in the world, with 15 stages, two permanent sets, state-of-the-art film-making equipment and facilities, and 1,300 employees. The 1960s was a period of intense rivalry between Shaw Brothers and Cathay Organisation, but eventually Shaw Brothers gained the upper hand and Cathay ceased film production in 1970. Some of Shaw Brothers' most notable films were made in this period, including The Magnificent Concubine, The Love Eterne, as well as One-Armed Swordsman, which broke the box office records and spawned multiple sequels. Over the years the film company produced some 1,000 films, some of them being the most popular and significant Chinese-language films of the period. The studio popularised the kung-fu genre of films, which later included Five Fingers of Death and The 36th Chamber of Shaolin. In the 1970s, Shaw Brothers faced a strong challenge from a new studio, Golden Harvest, which had considerable success internationally with the martial arts film 'Enter the Dragon' starring Bruce Lee. Shaw Brothers then also began to co-produce films with western producers for the international market, and invested in films such as Meteor and Blade Runner. However, Shaw Brothers ceased film production in 1986 because of competition from Golden Harvest and increasing piracy, focusing instead on TV production. In 1986, Movietown became TV City, which was leased to TVB for TV production. In 1988, the company was reorganized under the umbrella of Shaw Organisation. In the 1990s, Shaw again started making a few films, but no longer on the same scale as before. In 2011 Shaw Brothers was reorganised into the Clear Water Bay Land Company Limited, its film production business being taken over by other companies within the Shaw conglomerate. Shaw Studios / Movietown has been vacant since 2003. There are plans to eventually turn it into a Grade I historical site but there is no sign of this taking place at the moment. Shaw Studios has since relocated to a new site in Tseung Kwan O, Hong Kong. Hong Kong is extremely hot and humid at this time of year, often with up to 95% humidity, so this was a tiring explore. The mosquitoes and cockroaches absolutely love it though so you're never short of a few friends along the way ..... If you ever come here, definitely pack some bug spray. Now, despite covering a lot of ground in a few hours here, we only managed to see a fraction of what is left. It's absolutely massive. There are a couple of active looking buildings but the majority is completely deserted. I wish we'd gone back to see the rest but too many #gintops (don't ask *smh*) got in the way. Hong Kong's a pretty epic place but I would recommend visiting at another time of year to avoid the humidity. There's a lot to explore so I may return next year. Shaw studios will be the first place I come back to if I do. For a more extensive report check out drhowser's report here > https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/shaw-bros-studios-hong-kong-sept-17.109830/#post-1182300 This building appeared to be set up for functions Studio named after George Clooney randomly Rooms of old film reels and projection equipment just lying around.... This was the guy who made it all happen. He lived until the age of 106!! RIP Sir Shaw 謝謝你的期待
  4. 1 point
    As usual with our explores, they are never really a walk in the park. Access to the building itself was a challenge as the top area in which we needed to go was locked off completely. Thankfully, being quite adapted to the tasks at hand, we managed to ride on top of a lift to gain access to the building. Once inside it was clear that the building was in quite a bad state. Natural erosion has started eating away at the 60 year old building, and rust can be found throughout. Pigeons were lurking in the crevices and the whole place smelt of damp. The building was a former office block but has been abandoned for 20 or more years. Here is some of the best photos we managed to get. Thanks for looking! C P.S - Check out our channel! https://www.youtube.com/user/Kirbsvids
  5. 1 point
    An independent members only club, dedicated to the working man who required a certain place for private meetings and events. This place has a little bit of everything. Dark, creepy unlit rooms, and rooms where light was still flourishing through the gaps and crevices. It has had many aliases since the buildings birth in the 1920's and had less than 300 members. Along the many years the workmens club was usually packed full of people, to the point you couldn't even move. Slowly but surely however the club started to lose money as members became scarce. It couldn't pay it's own way and since the number of members started dwindling, the Workmans club had to close its doors to the few remaining loyal members. Now sits empty and has done for more than 6 years now. Hopefully the building can see new life in the near future, but for me it was good to get an unusual view of the club. Cheers for looking!
  6. 1 point
    When I first saw pictures of this Hotel I fell in love with its architecture. I absolutely love the connection of fairfaced concrete and wood. Therefore I definately had to visit it although before decay had a chance to begin. Unfortunately vandalism comes faster than decay. Despite the bad light conditions and suddenly appearing "visitors" and a barking dog that required a sudden breakup I am quite happy about my visit. #1 DSC02622-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC02612-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC02613-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC02614-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC02615-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC02617-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC02618-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC02621-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC02620-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC02625-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC02627-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC02632-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC02634-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC02635-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC02636-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC02637-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    Such a unique location, very weird but fascinating that someone lived in there!
  9. 1 point
    Loving this mate. Your photos are exceptional 👌
  10. 1 point
    some very nice pictures there
  11. 1 point
    This place has been brought to my attention a lot recently... still haven’t managed to locate it 😩 would love to have a look round. Great pictures 😬
  12. 1 point
    A small chapel built in a small park. Just behind it is a steel gate and stairs leading to the crypt. In the middle, cool, quiet ... dark. A lit torch reveals the secret of the crypt. Stacked coffins, side by side. Judging by the size, adults buried there ... and between them ... between them two small coffins, probably they were babies. Seven family members buried in a common crypt ... (Translated in a translator)
  13. 1 point
  14. 1 point
    One of the most random places Ive seen, that TV set is bizarre
  15. 1 point
    The history A two-storey mill built in 1831 which resides two miles west of the town centre of Huddersfield. The Financial Reporting Council (FCR) of 1834 shows Armitage Bros already established here. The family name 'Armitage' pre-dates the 14th century, but it was Joseph Armitage (1778-1860) who significantly increased the family fortune and moved decisively into the gentry class. In 1822 he built the first woollen manufacturing mill at Milnsbridge, by the 1840's he handed over control of the business to his sons, who reconstituted it as a partnership called Armitage Bros, which survived until it became a limited company. By 1914 it was part of John Crowther's group. In the late 19th century John Crowther and his two sons moved from Marsden down the Clone Valley to Milnsbridge after purchasing two mills, where they began the successful production of woollen cloth. Crowther took his own life in 1931 and its thought that the death of his wife and the great depression were cumulative in this. Today parts of the mill are rented to a few small business, elsewhere derelict. The explore It's not often where in this neck of the woods... but when we are we always take a trip down Factory Lane. We've attempted this a few times... gates drawn, security breathing down our necks or locals asking us our intentions... seems if your walking round an abandoned building your the local scrap man even though your donning DSLR cameras. Anyway... been one of Crowther's we knew we were in for a treat. so.. sitting waiting.. waiting a bit more... we were in. The sheer size, the beautiful architecture, the remains of the mid century furniture... thank f*uck we drove down for a look. It looks like some of the mill buildings have been demolished at some point... but even so this place is huge!!! On entrance we were presented by a grand entrance hall which led into various areas of the mill... Of note was the sheer amount of mid- century furniture scattered around the mill... an entire floor decked with Parkay flooring... and a rather odd looking exercise bike that reminded us of a SinclairsC-5... we even came across a quad bike dumped in one of the corners of the mill. We loved it hear... its full of little gems hidden here and there we spent quite some time at the old mill as where not sure if we will be able to access this again... Some pics lbe
  16. 1 point
    You covered this really well & I enjoyed reading up on the history I like it, theres lots left there with some random machines and textiles etc. Those old signs are pretty cool too. I like the fireplace, looks really clean too. The parquet flooring is looking old but still has such a nice effect not to mention its probably worth a fortune! Well done on this mate
  17. 1 point
    Thats real nice Andy, REALLY like the first shot! Also like the mummification you found there! Its like he just laid down to die. Looks like a really nice place and the decay has set in nicely
  18. 1 point
    Really nice place, did you also visited the one of the many cotonificio in that area?
  19. 1 point
    this is interesting... i like it 👍
  20. 1 point
    Welcome to the forum!
  21. 1 point
    hi there... I am an amateur photographer from Melbourne Australia.. love photographing abandoned locations..
  22. 1 point
    Long time North East US explorer who just relocated down to the RTP area of North Carolina looking for some people to explore with. Here's a sample of some of my past explores:
  23. 1 point
    A. E. was a successful craftsman building music instruments. He met a girl, married her and became father of two kids. Sadly he died early. His wife, getting older, decided to bequeath everything to the kids. But she became very old and outlived her kids. When Ms E. died she was 99 years old and bequeathed the house to a religious order. For more than 10 years the house faded in obscurity. This is what remained after all those years. #1 DSC02496-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC02499-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC02500-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC02503-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC02501-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC02505-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC02506-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC02508-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC02509-Bearbeitet-2-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC02511-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC02515-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC02514-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC02516-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC02517-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC02518-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC02522-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC02523-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC02546-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC02525-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC02526-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC02527-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC02531-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #23 DSC02539-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #24 DSC02537-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #25 DSC02535-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #26 DSC02532-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #27 DSC02533-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #28 DSC02541-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #29 DSC02550-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #30 DSC02553-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #31 DSC02558-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #32 DSC02555-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #33 DSC02569-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #34 DSC02565-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #35 DSC02566-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #36 DSC02563-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #37 DSC02559-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  24. 1 point
    History Ladybower was built between 1935 and 1943 by the Derwent Valley Water Board to supplement the other two reservoirs in supplying the water needs of the East Midlands. It took a further two years to fill (1945). The dam differs from the Howden Reservoir and Derwent Reservoir in that it is a clay-cored earth embankment, and not a solid masonry dam. Below the dam is a cut-off trench 180 feet (55 m) deep and 6 feet (1.8 m) wide filled with concrete, stretching 500 feet (150 m) into the hills each side, to stop water leaking round the dam. The dam wall was built by Richard Baillie and Sons, a Scottish company. The two viaducts, Ashopton and Ladybower, needed to carry the trunk roads over the reservoir were built by the London firm of Holloways, using a steel frame clad in concrete. The project was delayed when the Second World War broke out in 1939, making labour and raw materials scarce. But construction was continued due to the strategic importance of maintaining supplies. King George VI, accompanied by Queen Elizabeth, formally opened the reservoir on 25 September 1945. During the 1990s the wall was raised and strengthened to reduce the risk of over-topping in a major flood. The original dam wall contains 100,000 tons of concrete, over one million tons of earth and 100,000 tons of clay for the core. The upstream face is stone faced. Materials were brought to the site on the Derwent Valley Water Board's own branch line and their sidings off the main line in theHope Valley. The dam's design is unusual in having two totally enclosed bellmouth overflows (locally named the "plugholes") at the side of the wall. These are stone and of 80 feet (24 m) diameter with outlets of 15 feet (4.6 m) diameter. Each discharges via its own valve house at the base of the dam. The overflows originally had walkways around them but they were dismantled many years ago. The bell mouths are often completely out of the water and are only rarely submerged, often after heavy rainfall or flooding. Explore On our way from Manchester, back to Leicester, I decided to take the car I was in, over Snake Pass. We were an hour ahead of UrbanCaving's car and I didn't have a key to his house, so there was no rush back to middle England. Beautiful road and after a couple of stops for photos, we were coming towards Ladybower Reservoir. So I posed the question, "As we're here, why not?" I've wanted to do this beauty for years, each time I've been in the area, the bellmouths have been flowing well. After weeks of little to no rain, we had our chance to strike. The general opinion was "Fuck it, why not?" So we pulled into the car park, got the camera kit on and headed on our way. Once in, I was gobsmacked with the size. And the echo. Awesome sneaky explore which put us behind schedule by an hour (sorry UrbanCaving). Really enjoyed this one, certainly worth the lateness. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  25. 1 point
    Cheers it's a good little mooch and the first time I've been exploring with my old man. As soon as we arrived there was a sign saying £1000 for trespassing and he just laughed and said I'm game if you are lol
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