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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/20/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    First report here, the well-known Chateau wolfenstein. Lost somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes, the castle was built 1931 by a rich Baron. It has many use throught the years, hospital, command centre during the war, care home for soldiers and, apparently some kind of jail for war and politic prisonners. Now, it 's still a part a the hospital complex but it is unused, except for a room where the hospital stocks some servers.
  2. 3 points
    An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  3. 3 points
    A couple of days ago I went up into a local forest to search for a tiny old school. There are no location details online so it kind of was like looking for a needle in a haystack so finding something was better than nothing at all No, the music isn't from Psycho
  4. 3 points
    After a bunch of sweaty sausages in a hot car, we drove to Château Rochendaal. It was built in 1881 and during WWII it was occupied by German forces and became part of an airfield complete with three runways. After the war, it was used by the Belgian Air Force, which you could still see by the stickers in some of the barracks. It was abandoned in 1996. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Strewn around the property were a few barracks and houses, which seemed to a be part of the Air Force Base. They were all in varying states of decay, but all of them had hundreds of flies buzzing. I later learned the police still use this place to train their dogs - glad we didn’t run into them. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. After a long drive down the Belgian version of “Red Light District”, our next stop was HFB. Which was a giant metal production plant. Built around 1917 but finally shut down in 2011 when it was cheaper to import it. We ran into quite a few metal thieves, but it seemed like they didn’t even bother with us. Sadly I wasn’t able to make it into the control rooms, my boots were too slippery for the wet metal. So I decided to start walking towards our car, on my way out I noticed 5 silhouettes who were loading metal in a car, they all stopped working and started at me. Luckily nothing came of it. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. I asked a shady looking couple for directions to the nearest shop and apparently I must have walked the wrong way, because the next thing I see is the shady looking couple in their car asking me to get in. It didn’t sound like the brightest idea, but I find myself in the backseat of the car speeding down the roads of Liege. We find an open shop and I grab refreshments for everybody for our trip to Alla Italia. Alla Italia is an old health resort, which opened in 1868 and has been abandoned for over 15 years by now. Judging by the looks, it was quite a luxurious place and must have attracted quite a few wealthy people. However, I learned that the nice “paintings” in the roof, is actually just some wallpaper. But it didn’t take away from the experience, since the whole place is gorgeous. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. After a speedy exit, because a passerby saw one of us in a bathtub we opted for some nice steaks right across the road. After a nights sleep, we made a quick stop at the cooling tower. Which is pretty cool to photograph with a fisheye lens. I have already mentioned it in my previous post, so not gonna go into its history. 27. 28. Our last stop on the tour, was at Crypte L. Which I sadly haven’t been able to dig up some history on. But it was well worth a visit. 29. 30. 31. 32. Curious George over and out! 33.
  5. 3 points
    This was pretty much the last explore from day 1 of our trip,yes its very done to death but i havnt seen it so it was new to me and something i wanted to do..Think the cemetery is closed now as there is signs pof work being carried out with portacabins and security etc Explored with crazy fool,SpaceInvader and Sx-riffraff Not a huge amount of pics as they all get a bit samey tbh..Loads i could have done with the 50mm but im not a fan of too many close ups of peoples names on the stones,so here's a mixed batch ! Now theres a few shots i have with this guy,He's called eric which is the name sx-riffraff gave him..thing is my wife does a lot of crochet and wanted me to take something she had made and photograph it in various locations so she can post the pics on the sites/pages the crochet gang use..so if its not "proper exploring"Tough one last one of eric..
  6. 3 points
    This was an old explore from 2012 , the church and school closed in 1977 and Im not sure if its still empty or has been redeveloped
  7. 3 points
    History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  8. 3 points
    Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  9. 2 points
    It was a very long trip on this day - 23.5 hours on the road, 1480 km driven... But it was worth it. In the afternoon we reached our third place, this old house on the outskirts of a small village. From the outside it was already pretty overgrown. Nevertheless, access wasn't difficult. Inside were old furniture, various dolls, a piano, and everything surrounded by beautiful decay. Only the smell of a decaying fox in the entrance area wasn't really pleasant... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  10. 2 points
    History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  11. 2 points
    One of the objects located in the campsite. Why a house is bad. When I was inside, alone ... there was a squeaky door from everywhere and the cracking of the boards against each other. The blame for all this is borne by the wind and frost ... however, when you sit in such an object yourself, different thoughts come to mind. In fact, I was not alone ... my friend was outside ... but the distance between us (at a given moment and situation) was comparable to the width of the Vistula (in fact it was enough to just walk out the window). Great property, amazing atmosphere ... great rooms .... (Translator...sorry)
  12. 2 points
    Only a few quick shots, taken without a tripod. I don't know when the chapel (called "Capel Zinc") was built, it was a subsidiary tabernacle for the now Holy Trinity Church in Corris. Chairs has been removed and apparently the property is now used by a flower grower. Visited with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4
  13. 2 points
    This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany. This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown. The only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites. IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  14. 2 points
    Was a really good explore and the flying buttress on the building was amazing ..... so clever to design a building like that
  15. 2 points
  16. 2 points
    I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
    Thanks all Was a nice way to spend an hour on a sunny afternoon.
  19. 2 points
    This church had been on my bucket list for a while and I finally got access, granted it happened last year. I don't know a lot of the history of the church, other than the congregation was founded by German immigrats in the 1800s. The origional church burned in the Chicago fire and a new one was constructed in 1904. In the 1910s Polish immigrants moved in and the German congregation declined in membership. It bounced back and years later in the 50s a large Puerto Rican population came in and spanish masses were offered for the first time. Membership throughout the 60s and 70s etc kept declining and in 1990 the church officially closed. The rectory, convent and school were all torn down. As for the chruch a development company owns it and want's to turn it into luxury condos and a music school.
  20. 2 points
    hi Dubbed Navigator The Limeworks shut in 1999 and its being consumed by nature ....In its final years the limeworks produced lime and chalk for agriculture and nurseries called ‘Calco’ and ‘Nurslim’. The lime and chalk was extracted from the quarry at the top of the hill and then processed through various crushers before being milled and fired in one of the eight huge lime kilns built into the side of a quarry dating back two or three centuries. i have a few more photos
  21. 1 point
    need to add Japan in the flag section still
  22. 1 point
    Nice Andy, keep meaning to pop in here when im passing
  23. 1 point
    wow, really amazing building, was just researching it a little bit and see there are over 100 houses there with military families in pus some 28 vacant and being vandalised, how old are the photos ? as if still in this condition im thinking its worth the drive
  24. 1 point
    Thanks @hamtagger managed to get a few shots within the time frame ☺️ Sorry @Dubbed Navigator , I don't mate.
  25. 1 point
    Nice pictures) That's what I can add from my side)
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