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  1. 8 points
    History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  2. 6 points
    My first real Urban Exploration was done on that airfield. This is where it all began for me and it wasn't even that long ago! The airfield opened in 1936, initially for the usage for civilian air traffic such as sport flying (if that's a word). Not only that but the area was also used for construction of various aircraft-related mechanisms and for supporting the army with weapon technology during the Second World War. The Red Army took over operations after WW2 which explains the signs with cyrillic writing. DSC_4227 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_4266 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_4404 by anthrax, auf Flickr The album with all pictures can be found here and my thorough post here.
  3. 6 points
    A large hospital,build in the 60's and will be demolished soon. It was one of the hospitals where they also removed the lamps and tables in the OK room. But still a nice location for a Saturday with a nice staircase. More can be found on my flickr page. http:// https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums
  4. 5 points
    This would be my 2nd fav kirkbride of those that I've seen so far and I was obsessed with seeing it. My first visit however was not the best as it was 8­F when I first got in and maybe warmed up to 19 outside but felt much colder inside. It was too cold really to focus on taking photos, too cold to really take my hands out of my gloves but necessary. I dropped my 24-70 lens on the floor fumbling around with big ass gloves on trying to switch lenses, when I got home in the wee hours of the morning the next day I was just carrying my camera (why it wasn't in the bag I don't know) and I dropped it in the driveway...with the same lens attached :(. I also lost 75 photos or so from that trip and found out later it was due to a faulty card reader when I was transferring them. So with all that I had to go back again and reshoot and one photo in particular I wanted to capture again was the sun streaming through the decorative risers on the stairway and onto the wall. Well neither of the times I went back was the sun out so I never was able to get that photo again. Last visit at least I had the newer camera as I sold the 7D a month prior AND it wasn't so freakn cold.
  5. 5 points
    The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  6. 5 points
    On my way back from Belgium I stopped at Maison Kirsch at Luxemburg. #1 DSC01703-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC01743-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC01705-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC01737-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC01710-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC01745-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC01712-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC01749-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC01714-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC01742-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC01718-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC01729-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC01730-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC01731-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC01733-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC01746-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC01752-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC01756-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  7. 4 points
    The once grand Bureau Central administration building now stands decayed and rotting, but still retains nearly all of it's character. History The Bureau Central was the main offices for the de Wendel Family Metal company. The Family had been involved in metal industry since the 18th Century. By the 19th Century they were the 3rd largest iron company in Franc. In 1870 they became the largest iron company after a major furnace upgrade successfully modernised their production. During this period they employed 7000 people and were producing 112,500 tonnes of iron and 134,500 tonnes of pig iron each year. When they expanding to steelmaking, they needed a grand main office to impress customers and keep on top of their every growing enterprise, and so in 1892 Central Bureau was built. In 1926 the Bureau Central was expanded to cope with the still growing paperwork. The de Wendal iron enteprise continued to flourish until the post WW2 period where business fell into a decline. The mining industry was nationalised and eventually the whole family company was completely nationalised. Bureau Central was abandoned in the 1980's after a company merger. The building itself is listed and protected. The Explore The first attempt at Bureau Central was a bit of a fail as there was a worker cutting trees right behind the building, exactly where I needed to be. So I went off to explore a plan B (Terre Rouge) and returned a few days later on a Saturday morning when it was much quieter, and I got in with no drama this time. The building is very decayed and has been well trashed. Looking at older photos it seems its been in a bad state of decay for a number of years, and not much has changed recently. It's got 4 levels including a huge basement level. The building is pretty big, with lots of rooms, but most of them are empty and layered in collapsed ceiling material. However the grandeur, architecture and nice lighting makes it the most photogenic explore I've done for a while. The long corridors, skylights and peeling paint tick all the boxes of a good decay photo. I was there alone for a couple hours until 5 German Explorers showed up to explore it too. Turned out to be a really decent bunch too. A cracker of an explore! Photos
  8. 3 points
    Disclaimer: Some of the images displayed in my album contain anti semitic graffiti. I'm not promoting anti semitism here but am only showcasing what's inside this bunker. Today's post is about the exploration of a World War II bunker, that has been abandoned since approximately 1955, when Austria signed the Declaration of Neutrality. Construction began during the war but because of the siege of the Red Army, the bunker was never finished. Nowadays, most of the former exits have been walled off with only one proper entry and exit remaining. Rescuing people trapped in certain areas of the facility would be close to impossible, due to some entrances being filled with stones and mud. You imagine bunkers like concrete mazes and even though it looked like one, it was hard to get lost. It was very easy to navigate around even though the tunnels measure about 700m (0.45 miles) in total. Initially, there were around 5 to 7 entrances throughout the whole structure which made it impossible to get lost. DSC_5054 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5080 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5085 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5090 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5124 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6339 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6351 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6353 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6357 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6369 by anthrax, auf Flickr If anyone is interested in more, the full album of photos can be found here and my post about the structure here.
  9. 3 points
    The well known Lycée V. has been a grammar school for girls only. It#s been closed in the 1990's and abandoned since. #1 DSC01600-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC01601-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC01605-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC01639-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC01607-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC01647-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC01632-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC01623-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC01621-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC01615-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC01612-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  10. 3 points
    Smudges 1st ever photographic report - may 2018 Smudges has been known by numerous other names over the years from The Crofters Arms Hotel to McGees to Moghuls Palace but has always retained it's charm and character. A true time capsule rotting away in the heart of Bolton. Featuring some stunning hand-carved bars and one of two of this type of revolving doors that exist the other located in a grand hotel in London. The Urban Collective We Film It... Thank you for checking out my pics guys! Clarky The Urban Collective We Film It...
  11. 3 points
    This old chapel in the middle of the forest was the first stop during my last trip to France on the penultimate weekend. Only a small and overgrown path leads to it. If you don't know the location, you'll hardly find it; even from the winding country road below the chapel, it's barely visible. Inside were still several beautiful things - dusty plastic flowers, small Madonna statuettes and images of saints, as well as two rosary necklaces with crosses. In a broken stone the date 13th of April 1870 was engraved. However, I don't know when the secluded chapel was actually built. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  12. 3 points
    Really interesting photos. Well done.
  13. 2 points
    The history of Coalbrookdale foundry dates back all the way to 1572 when the land was passed to John Brooke who developed coal mining there on a substantial scale. A blast furnace was built at the site to produce iron, which blew up in 1703. It remained derelict until the arrival of Abraham Darby I in 1709. Abraham Darby I set about rebuilding the Coalbrookdale Furnace, using coke as the fuel. His business was that of an iron founder, making cast iron pots and other goods, an activity in which he was particularly successful because of his patented foundry method, which enabled him to produce cheaper pots than his rivals. The furnace was the first coke-fired blast furnace to operate successfully for a prolonged period of time. The Coalbrookdale Foundry – this area has since been converted into a museum Following the death of Abraham Darby II, Abraham Darby II was brought into the business as an assistant manager when old enough. The Company also became early suppliers of steam engine cylinders in this period. Experiments took place with the application of coke pig iron to the production of bar iron in charcoal finery forges. This proved to be a success, and led to the beginning of a great expansion in coke iron making. In 1768, the company began to produce the first cast iron rails for railways. In 1778, Abraham Darby III undertook the building of the world’s first cast iron bridge, the iconic Iron Bridge, opened in 1780. The fame of this bridge leads many people today to associate the Industrial Revolution with the neighbouring village of Ironbridge, but in fact most of the work was done at Coalbrookdale, as there was no settlement at Ironbridge in the eighteenth century. Workers boots hung on the front gate The blast furnaces were closed down, perhaps as early as the 1820s, but the foundries remained in use. The Coalbrookdale Company became part of an alliance of iron founding companies who were absorbed by Allied Iron founders Limited in 1929. This was in turn taken over by Glynwed which has since become Aga Foodservice. Castings for Aga Rayburn cookers were produced at Coalbrookdale until its closure in November 2017. Delivery yard, where the raw materials and scrap iron arrive One of the two cupolas, seen from the melt shop delivery yard Archive image of molten iron being taken from the cupola Number 1 cupola. This mini blast furnace melted the iron ready to be cast. Number 2 furnace Above the furnaces Compressors which blew air into the cupolas Rear of the furnaces Ladles hanging from an overhead rail system for transporting molten iron One of the ladles Moving into the casting area where we find racks of moulds Patterns laid out on the floor Patterns laid out on the floor The main casting shop contains a fair bit of automated casting equipment Beside the production line with wagons on rails for transporting castings Casting production line Casting production line End of the casting line Casting machine, where the molten iron is pored into Archive image of molten iron being poured into cast Automated production lines Automated production lines Tanks and conveyors Towards the end of the factory we find more machinery Forklift trucks Cherry picker Extraction hoods in an old part of the site The workshops shop contained a handful of machines Dress in the machine shop A pair of drills More drill-presses Finally, some of their finished products – an Aga in the canteen along with a Rangemaster fridge
  14. 2 points
    I have visited here many times now, and i put a premature report up from the first night without exploring too much. So here is a round up of each explore with a sh*t tonne of photos thrown in for good measure. Visit 1 - Night of closure; Totally drunk off our success at Redcar Blast furnace the week before, myself and Raz decided to push our luck and go for our second high profile explore. So as the Hargreaves trucks i service at work pulled out of the gates for the last time, we made our way along the canal. Once we reached our agreed point of entry, we noted that things on the site were far from quiet. With trucks, diggers and dumpers still milling around clearly away the black stuff we crawled (litterally) all the way from the perimeter fence to the closest of the conveyors, and up to the top to scout it out. Quickly we realised this conveyor didnt go very far, and with that in mind we descended to the bottom ready for another labourious crawl. As luck was on our side we had a small window in which to leg it to the next conveyor. Excellect we thought, easy from here. NAHHHHH... the ladders to reach the conveyor were in direct sight of around 7 or 8 diggers moving coal away, and to make things just that little bit more difficult, when we spotted a small alley way in which we could run across the open space, a train rolled in and stopped blocking us completely. Now what? So we waited for around an hour, thinking that the guys in the diggers would go on their breaks sooner rather than later. Again, no. So when we decided it was make or break time, Raz inched closer to the ladders and went for it. 30 seconds later he was at the top. My turn... with my heart in my mouth, i watched the dumper make its way towards me, and then after what seemed like an age, passed me. Scurrying over the heap of coal i was off, up the ladders and on reaching the top threw myself over the edge and into the relitive safety of the conveyor. I took a moment then to catch my breath and stop myself going into a cardiac arrest. Along the conveyor we walked, passing over the diggers still working away, unaware of us. Through a very dark slippy conveyor and into the sorting plant above the train. Now we came across a conveyor belt which was moving, dragging up coal fresh from the seam that day. The last of the coal ever to be pulled from the seam in fact. I was mesmorised. So much so that neither myself or Raz heard the worker who walked down the belt towards us. "What are you doing lads?" "Just taking some photos, that okay?" "I dont really give a f*ck" Time for offskies, and im glad we did because a few minutes later alrms every where and a voice over the intercom telling workers to be on the look out for 2 lads with cameras. A good start, but we'll be back. Visit 2; As is expected we were back within weeks, this time, with The Amatuer Wanderer. Having done the rest of the Redcar SSI sites in the meantime, we were now a lot more confident about high profile places, and by now we were itching to get back at it. So the same way in, but this time now diggers or workers, just a lot more water and mud to contend with. I can deal with that. So this time we managed everywhere other than the headstock, and what an explore it was. lights still on in the bath house and the coolest search yourself sign ever Visit 3; This time with Raz, Butters and Jord (really taking the piss with 4 of us lmfao) we beelined straight for the headstock. No messing around, just up it and thats it. I think that out of all of the colliery this is by far the best part. With some futuristic looking headgear controls and several massive wheels it made my day. So thats it. We've covered the vast majority of the site, so an end to our explores here really... but on a more serious note, it is the end of an era, especially for us Yorkshire folk who's families and friends have been closely linked to the pits for their whole lives. My Father worked down Sharlston pit, My Uncle down Hatfield in its day and one by one they were sealed up and shut down. When it was Big K's time, there were high emotions in the surrounding towns, and a march was organised in nearby Knottingley to give her a send off she deserved. I felt like we had to give her a send of of our own, by documenting the last days of our iconic history. Kellingley Colliery (Big K) 1965 - 1984 / 1984 - 2015 Thanks for looking
  15. 2 points
    This is inside of a factory that was once used for producing the somewhat famous Pandur-Tanks. This area of the factory closed sometime in 2015/16, with first signs showing as early as 2010. At first the company decided to restructure by stopping production and only using the plant at this location for tank maintenance, service and repair. When this decision was finalized about 60% of employees were dismissed. Reasoning - there wasn't enough demand for new vehicles. In late 2016 the police was called to a so called "illegal rave" that was held in one of the former production halls. Tens of thousands of euros in equipment were left behind. full story 50+ pics DSC_5646 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6939 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5665 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5724 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5739 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6707 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6743_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6812 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  16. 2 points
    After a bunch of sweaty sausages in a hot car, we drove to Château Rochendaal. It was built in 1881 and during WWII it was occupied by German forces and became part of an airfield complete with three runways. After the war, it was used by the Belgian Air Force, which you could still see by the stickers in some of the barracks. It was abandoned in 1996. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Strewn around the property were a few barracks and houses, which seemed to a be part of the Air Force Base. They were all in varying states of decay, but all of them had hundreds of flies buzzing. I later learned the police still use this place to train their dogs - glad we didn’t run into them. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. After a long drive down the Belgian version of “Red Light District”, our next stop was HFB. Which was a giant metal production plant. Built around 1917 but finally shut down in 2011 when it was cheaper to import it. We ran into quite a few metal thieves, but it seemed like they didn’t even bother with us. Sadly I wasn’t able to make it into the control rooms, my boots were too slippery for the wet metal. So I decided to start walking towards our car, on my way out I noticed 5 silhouettes who were loading metal in a car, they all stopped working and started at me. Luckily nothing came of it. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. I asked a shady looking couple for directions to the nearest shop and apparently I must have walked the wrong way, because the next thing I see is the shady looking couple in their car asking me to get in. It didn’t sound like the brightest idea, but I find myself in the backseat of the car speeding down the roads of Liege. We find an open shop and I grab refreshments for everybody for our trip to Alla Italia. Alla Italia is an old health resort, which opened in 1868 and has been abandoned for over 15 years by now. Judging by the looks, it was quite a luxurious place and must have attracted quite a few wealthy people. However, I learned that the nice “paintings” in the roof, is actually just some wallpaper. But it didn’t take away from the experience, since the whole place is gorgeous. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. After a speedy exit, because a passerby saw one of us in a bathtub we opted for some nice steaks right across the road. After a nights sleep, we made a quick stop at the cooling tower. Which is pretty cool to photograph with a fisheye lens. I have already mentioned it in my previous post, so not gonna go into its history. 27. 28. Our last stop on the tour, was at Crypte L. Which I sadly haven’t been able to dig up some history on. But it was well worth a visit. 29. 30. 31. 32. Curious George over and out! 33.
  17. 2 points
    Hello folks! I recently visited an abandoned military barrack which was used by Pioneers for almost a hundred years. The area is abandoned for a few years now, 2015 the buildings were used for accommodation for refugees. Since somewhere around then, the place sits empty. There are already plans on how the area is going to be used once they tore down the remains of the barracks. A new district housing around 2500 people, a school campus and a kindergarten amongst other things will be built here. All that a car-free zone. Can't say I'm too bummed about that, sounds like it could be a sick project! DSC_6434 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6453 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6463 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6478 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6486 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6494 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6512 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6544 by anthrax, auf Flickr If I could excite you for more, check out the full album here or my post about it here.
  18. 2 points
    This former school swimming pool was built in 1904 and abandoned in 1997. I happened upon it randomly and had a hunch that there might be a swimming pool inside but didn't expect much given the state of the exterior. Well, it turned out to be pretty decent inside. Clearly nobody has been inside here for a very long time. The pigeons have set up shop and went absolutely bonkers when they saw me. They've really done a number on the place, or should I say a number two? It's pretty minging to be honest but at least there's no shitty graffiti or vandalism. This was a night visit so I had to light paint all my shots. I didn't do too badly considering but it would be cool to see it in daylight. Hopefully someone else will have a look soon. This long curtain covered spectator seating for some reason The floor up here was well dodgy, you can just about see some holes on the left of shot Cheers for looking
  19. 2 points
    Thanks for the Welcome. I am from Scotland UK and enjoy urban exploration and photography.
  20. 2 points
    One of my favorite sites, I just love this building with its stunning wood structure, shame the vandals keep try to torch it!
  21. 2 points
    Hi all! We decided to hit the road and head for Staines to take a look at an industrial warehouse which was still full of all the old stuff! I couldn't find much history about the place as it is very old and from what I can see dates back to 1919 so a very long time. The explore was awesome, checking out all of the old machinery in the building and having a good wonder around! Access was fairly straight forward after having a quick scout of the building but once inside we were amazed at how big this place actually was! Anyway please feel free to check the footage!
  22. 2 points
    Here are some of my photos. Perhaps not always "vintage", but at least older industry. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  23. 2 points
    I took a lot photos of doors and doorways in recent years. Really many ... Maybe you think now, I've finally gone crazy. But I just couldn't decide which pictures still to leave out. So, it has become, ahm, "a few" more photos now ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101
  24. 2 points
    Here's a few of my doors and doorways. I'll start with asylums, you're guaranteed to see lots and lots of photogenic doors... Nuclear bunker blast door Vagrants ward (remnant of an old workhouse) Prison H15 Sheffield courthouse cell Pritzer Fac Cambridge Military Hospital Childrens ward And of course possibly the most iconic doors ever....
  25. 2 points
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