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  1. 6 points
    On a main road in Belgium is an old factory site. There is not much left, but the machines already have something.
  2. 6 points
    Built in the early 20th century this church closed its doors in 2008. Although there was an open window and a ladder I decided to take the way through the tubular shaft beneath the church to enter the location. It has been something I've been looking forward to since planning the trip. Unhappily I did'nt expect 3 days of bad muscle soorness. 😒 😂 I have to admit that i left by the window. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 upstairs next #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19
  3. 6 points
    In the middle of France is this architecturally interesting house. The architectural style is unusual but interesting.
  4. 6 points
    Little trip to Wales over the weekend with Booie. This was a detour on the way home yesterday. Closed suddenly about 7 years ago and now up for auction. This lovely care home would have looked very grand in its prime no cheap plastic furniture here
  5. 5 points
    This was the second of two places we looked at, and was one of those 'we probably won't get into this one' places. It's always a bonus when you're pretty much convinced you wont get in then turn up & end up getting in 😀 The place was covered with mushrooms (Jews Ear apparently) and mould has taken it's hold on the place, by the time i got to the second floor started to feel a bit queasy breathing it all in, reminded me to get some masks for next time. A pretty cool place, with plenty to see and a variety of 'funky' lampshades... Started losing daylight by the time we reached the 3rd floor so the pics started to get gradually worse. History Not sure exactly when it opened but it was up & running in the 1930's. In it's day it stood on it's own extensive grounds over 3 acres. The greater portion of this was devoted to sun bathing and recreational lawns. The remainder was largely a kitchen garden which provided fresh garden produce to the tables. Quote from its promotional literature "The views from the bedrooms are delightful. Those on the front and on one side have an open outlook over the sea, the others overlook the golf links and the open country. Your views are in every room open, nothing shuts in any part of BRADDA PRIVATE HOTEL. 'BRADDA' has been entirely redesigned, enlarged, redecorated and refurnished, and is now one of the most beautiful hotels in the Island" Unsure exactly when it closed but from what i can tell it was around 2015. A proposal to demolish the dilapidated hotel and erect a residential care home, along with car parking, access and highway alterations, was submitted by Spaldrick Care Ltd in September last year. The developer estimated construction of the home would cost £5 million and create 60 full-time jobs. Around thirty families objected to the plans, as well as Port Erin Commissioners and the government's planning committee. Concerns were raised over the scale of the development, its impact on views, privacy, traffic and parking, as well as its conformity with both the Southern Area Plan, and the all-Island Strategic Plan. The plans were initially overruled by the Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture. However following a successful appeal by the developer this year, and on the recommendation of the planning inspector, the plans got the green-light. some of the lampshades some of the lovely mold & decay the place had to offer
  6. 5 points
    I came across this mining camp known as "Bonnie Claire" on a road trip in December of 2018. It has been abandoned for over 100 years so it is unsurprisingly badly deteriorated. The area is also contaminated with arsenic and cyanide, but of course that didn't stop me. A couple of the houses about half a klick south appear to be part of a newer mining operation and there is evidence they actually had power out here. Someone spent a few nights in one of the houses as recently as 2017, given the date on the newspapers.
  7. 4 points
    This doctor's office with adjoining villa has been empty for almost a quarter of a century. The last records are from 1994.
  8. 4 points
    I saw the old trailers on some waste ground and lo and behold behind them was an old transport and engineering hub deserted now
  9. 4 points
    The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though! Thanks for looking
  10. 4 points
    Afternoon, Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up Heres some history from googles... The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2] Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2] The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2] During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2] On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2] In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6] We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though... On to some pics Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Thanks for looking DJ
  11. 4 points
    On a large main street is this little house. There is no vandalism here and many little details to discover.
  12. 4 points
    Some of you may have already seen this one. This is a nice paper mill closed down almost a decade ago. There are many photos of this place when it was still active, and some of them were taken when the factory had been occupied by workers right after the closure... It's a rather good place still today, despite the amount of copper thieves who came here. There are still some interesting things such as the power station (probably the best part), the semi-active substation, some laboratories and archives... We also found a small container where a radioactive substance called thorium nitrate used to be stored. You can look at all my photos here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskQESLot
  13. 4 points
    So this place has nothing now but memories and juvenile grafitti The Witch Ball Inn was popular with the army guys in the 1940s, due to its proximity to Prees Heath airfield. In particular the Americans stationed there took a special liking to it. And yet after that there's very little on the place. It boasted an impressive function room and a now filled-in swimming pool, At some point in the 1980s the building came under new ownership and the name changed to The Cherry Tree Hotel. The swimming pool was actually converted into a fish pond, and a fountain was installed in the bar area. The pub was visited by Michael Cain whenever he was in the area visiting his daughter. it closed down, around 2005 was boarded up and then was consequentially plundered and trashed.
  14. 4 points
    This city is one of the best spots I have been and was a blast to explore. I had to go back a second time to cover the whole area; first in September 2018 and again in Late November. Picher Oklahoma was part of the Tri-State mining district, and was deemed contaminated in the late 90's by the EPA. A mass exodus followed and by 2010 the population had reached a mere 20 people, a shadow of what was once home to 9,000 people. Within the next 2 years the last residents were forced to leave and the city became completely abandoned. Although some buildings have been demolished, quite a few areas remain intact in both Picher and Cardin, which is adjacent and also a ghost town. All 3 towns nearby were also abandoned due to contamination from Picher. Today Picher is known as the most toxic city in the United States, and the water in the nearby streams and river is orange and red. Even the birds stay away, and the town is deathly silent.
  15. 3 points
    Albania is one of those countries where I didn't really know what to expect. Recent history saw the collapse of communism in the 90s which caused the economy to crash. Since then It has made remarkable economic progress, growing from one of the poorest nations in Europe to a middle-income country, with poverty declining by half during that period. We travelled from north to south and back again taking in a few places along the way. The people are friendly, the food is good, it has decent weather, and everything is extremely cheap. Here's some of what I got up to with Adders, extreme_ironing, Otter and Reenie. In the main square of Tirana the National History Museum has this famous mosaic called 'The Albanian' on the front. It tells the story of how Albanians have fought against invasion and occupation throughout the centuries. Just down the road are these colourful government buildings In the middle of the countryside we passed this communist monument, the 5 red stars symbolising communist ideology Shëngjin Naval Base After an epic fail elsewhere we headed to this small naval base which turned out to be pretty cool. I've already written a separate report on this so I won't include much about it here. Fier Power Plant Fier Power Station was Albania's largest thermal power plant having 6 identical groups of 31 MW each, totalling a capacity of 186 MW. The plant was decommissioned in 2007. Much of the site next to it was a fertiliser factory powered by the plant. The whole site has been completely stripped now, leaving just bland shells of buildings. The imposing chimneys and cooling towers however remain visible for miles as a reminder of its former importance. Old security office next to the original gate Always wanted a shot of adders pissing Cooling tower ladders have long since been removed The best bit about this place was taking in the views from one of the factory towers, although the staircase was a bit of a headfuck Factory buildings below The turbine hall. Amazingly two security guys appeared from nowhere and made us leave before we could grab any shots of the inside. You're really not missing much though as the turbines have been removed along with everything else. Why anyone is securing it is completely beyond me! Kombinati Metalurgjik, Elbasan Elbasan is located about 50km from the capital of Albania, Tirana. The Kombinati Metalurgjik steel works, a flagship of the Albanian industry, was built between the 1960s and 1970s. The complex was built by Chinese engineers with the assistance of Albanian specialists. The levels of pollution caused by the plant were the subject of much controversy in the 90s. The size of the site is colossal but only a few buildings remain operational today. Much of it is derelict beyond repair or has already been flattened. Most of the buildings you see in the distance here are barely standing. You can see the remains of a blast furnace to the left. The only buildings worth a look were located right next to the live site. This one was locked up tight with several dogs acting as security inside. Next door a few buildings were wide open Buckets for pouring molten steel Small control room. After this we went back to the car and found an old man shaking his walking stick at us angrily so we left. There were a few more buildings full of stuff that we didn't manage to get into as they were well locked up. Definitely a bit more to see here I think but nothing too epic. Përrenjas - Locomotive Graveyard The country's first standard gauge line was built in 1947. From then on the construction of the country's rail network underwent significant development as Albania was considered to be the only state in Europe not to have standard rail service. By 1987, 677 km of railway had been constructed in total, linking the main urban and industrial centres for the first time since the end of World War II. Train transport was the main transportation method until 1990. After the collapse of Communism, and increase in use of motor vehicles, the network fell into disrepair. Today the country's rail network is almost entirely defunct. In Përrejas we visited this group of abandoned diesel ČKD T669 locomotives. Përrenjas abandoned station. There was a man inside there who didn't appreciate us climbing on the trains Pyramid of Tirana On 14 October 1988, the pyramid opened as a museum about the legacy of Enver Hoxha, the long-time leader of Communist Albania, who died in 1985. When built, the pyramid was said to be the most expensive individual structure ever constructed in Albania. After 1991, following the collapse of Communism, the museum closed and for several years it was repurposed as a conference centre and exhibition venue. During the 1999 Kosovo War, the former museum was used as a base by NATO and humanitarian organisations. Since 2001, part of the Pyramid has been used as a broadcasting centre by Albanian media outlets Top Channel and Top Albania Radio. Numerous proposals have been made to demolish the structure but the majority of Tirana's citizens are against the demolition. In 2017 it was announced that the pyramid will not be demolished, but refurbished. In 2018, a new project was unveiled that would turn the Pyramid into a technology centre for youth focused on computer programming, robotics, and start ups. Inside I bumped into a sleepy eyed squatter who invited me to take a look around. We meant to have a pop at this under construction skyscraper overlooking the main square but unfortunately ran out of time Not a particularly impressive view from up here but certainly a unique one A few friends we made along the way A bunker full of goats all set for the apocalypse. Just one of the 173,371 bunkers in Albania! Thanks for looking!
  16. 3 points
    On my way home from an overnight explore down south, it seemed a shame to waste the beautiful summer-like days we were having in mid-February, so I decided to stop off at RAF Coningsby's old weapons storage facility. It's not all that far from where I live, and I'd been meaning to take a look whenever I had a chance, so this seemed like the ideal opportunity. History RAF Coningsby Remote Weapons Store, as the name suggests, is a facility built for the purpose of storing and preparing weapons including missiles and bombs, situated in a separate compound close to the outer edge of the main airbase. The facility was built in order to reduce the quantity of explosives stored within the base, therefore reducing the number of personnel and aircraft exposed to risk. An incident occurred in 1971 when an electrostatic discharge caused a SNEB rocket that was being prepared to initiate its rocket motor. Two armourers were killed, and this could be one of the reasons for deciding to build the store further away. RAF Coningsby itself is operational as Quick Reaction Alert station, and is home to Eurofighter Typhoons from No. 3 Squadron, No. XI Squadron and No. 29 Squadron. Little information is available about the history of the bomb store, but this is no surprise owing to the fact it belongs to an active RAF base. The facility has separate storage and preparation facilities and does not appear on historic maps dated 1977 or earlier. Hardened Aircraft Shelters were constructed within the airbase from 1981-1987 to accommodate Tornado Jets. The Tornados were capable of carrying a range of missiles and weaponry, so it is likely the weapons storage facility was built around the same time as the hangars to service the weaponry for those aircraft. The facility appears to have been out of use for a good number of years. Aerial view of the weapons store as seen on Google Maps This hand-drawn plan was found within the site View down the road of section 1 Storage areas in section 4 The entrance to storage area 14C Building 21F entrance Building 12 contained this mobile communications unit Inside the mobile comms unit There were also some opened crates of naval gun mounts Missile Servicing Bay and an ivy-clad building Inside the ivy building Missile Servicing Bay A few of the other buildings scattered around the site... Looking over to the command centre Inside the command centre Bunk beds I'm not sure what this does, but it looked pretty cool Huge diesel generator Sentry post at the east gate Eastern gateway
  17. 3 points
    Visited with 3 non members not really knowing much about the place other than it looked pretty cool from the outside. Damp and water damage had done a pretty good job on the place but it was still well worth visiting and the start of an amazing day. History Can't really find much on this place but before its abandonment, it was owned by a local water authority in relation to the nearby reservoir of the same name. these animals were positioned exactly like this when i found them, honest...
  18. 3 points
    Spotted this through the hedge just a DERP with stuff in thinking it must have been a show house at one time
  19. 3 points
    I been retired pretty much from the explore scene now for about 18 months and had the opportunity to spend the day with my Daughter in Hampshire so took the kids for a traipse in the woods..was told there was an old cottage that was boarded up near one the many trails..we found it and saw it was wide open so had a look around..nothing much left except a few fire places but the kids loved it so mission accomplished. After a bit of a walk,we spotted said house Closer now Kitchen cum Dining room range Just a few holes,nothing to worry about.. Living room Bedroom Front door with entrance down to the basement. Basement And finally,the fire place in the basement. So that was the foresters house..I was told it was haunted but I have yet to substantiate this claim.
  20. 3 points
    Sometimes I love my satnav today it took me a new route to the local cider farm rubber necking as i go along i spy a rather dilpidated chimney stack through the trees have a mooch? well it would be rude not to Built in 1812 thats all I know some nice stuff AND it is untouched by kids or taggers maybe I took its urbex virginity? lol
  21. 3 points
    I visited this little cemetery a few times in the last years cause it's not far from my home town. It is nothing unique but in the early daylight or the late evening light the atmosphere is fine. The pictures I made there before were not that bad but also not that special. This time it changed. We created a very special atmosphere with some artificial fog. This was only possible cause this day there was absolutely no wind. I really like the result, what do you think? 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
  22. 2 points
    The Italians don't mess around when it comes to architecture and this old sanatorium is no exception. Built in 1924 in an art deco style, it began life as a tuberculosis hospital before being converted into a generic hospital in the 1950s. In 2015 it closed down to make way for a new hospital. Most of it has been completely emptied now but the admin building and chapel are stunning regardless. The vast network of tunnels are pretty epic as well with workshops, locker rooms and some odd looking stretchers amongst other things down there. They connect every single building in the complex so you can access certain buildings that are sealed from outside. It's a big old place with a lot to see. I've been twice and still not seen it all. Wards Tunnels Admin Block The Chapel Thanks for looking
  23. 2 points
    A few of the many photos I took 😀 Full video here:
  24. 2 points
    When I die, honey when I part with the sun and I will be a long rather sad thing will you take care of me then? you will embrace your arms and you'll fix what broke cruel fate ...
  25. 2 points
    Absolutely. And thanks for all the welcomes y'all, I like this forum already.
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