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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/15/2018 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  2. 6 points
    History This factory was opened in 1900 and made cardboard out of straw, in that time this product was very popular so 8 years later the made another factory next to the other one. In 1968 the factory closed due to competition from abroad, after the factory was closed it was sold off to a men who repaired and sold off machines. The new owner only did nothing about maintenance of the old factory so the factory complex decayed rapidly. in 2005 the original factory was demolished and the other factory was luckily protected as a monument. Later in 2009 the restoration began on the still standing factory. 6 years later the company who began with the restoration began to have financial troubles so the factory was abandoned again. After being abandoned for 1 year the factory was bought on a auction for an incredible low price, after that the restoration was back on track again. Explore We went on a Sunday so the workers waren't working on the building. When we got there, there was a door opened so we could enter the beautiful old factory building. The highlight of the building was the old Turbine and the old ovens. Hope you enjoyed my post!
  3. 5 points
    Predannack opened in 1941 as an RAF base, but today is the satellite airfield to RNAS Culdrose - it is a restricted MOD site and an active airfield used daily for flying training and also provides our Fire Fighting training facility. The area is heavily utilised by Culdrose helicopter squadrons, light fixed wing aircraft and, on an occasional basis by other aircraft types including jet aircraft, for a variety of reasons. Predominantly crews are involved in intensive training sorties involving a high cockpit workload. On average there is in excess of 2000 aircraft moves a month at the unit. The airfield is also used by the Fire Training School for live fire fighting and rescue instruction/exercises and there is also a rifle range at Predannack which is frequently used for live weapon firings. Additionally the airfield is used for a variety of additional tasks when the Control Tower is unmanned e.g. gliding.
  4. 5 points
    Unfortunatly the Glen o dee hospital was pretty trashed , a few nice little bits
  5. 5 points
    Snowdown was the deepest colliery in Kent reaching well over 3,000 ft (915 metres). It was also the hottest and most humid pit in Kent and was given the name 'Dante's Inferno' by the miners. Regarded by many as the worst pit to work at in Britain, most Snowdown miners worked naked because clothes became too uncomfortable. The miners could consume around 24 pints (14 lires) of water in an 8-hour shift. There were frequent cases of heat stroke. Snowdown closed in 1987
  6. 4 points
    Somewhere in Germany, in a quiet park, lie those beautiful Tanks. Quiet park ? Not really, a military barrack nearby often throws training in this park, as the sign explained us kindly. 😂 We were lucky enough to dodge those training, even if i'm pretty sure it doesn't happen more than once a month, but still. We were not able to find which type of tanks it was, i read on the internet that it could be some M40 Patton or M41 Walker Bulldog, but i'm skeptical, as both of them were produced in the early 50's and were used in vietnam war and korea war, far from Germany. And, as they were demilitarized and trashed, the clues were hard to find. However, it was like a scene of war, one Tank crashed near a tree, another one half buried, very dramatic. Even if it was a short one, it was a very good exploration, with a lot of interesting light and very cool models.
  7. 4 points
    Hi fellas, I explore a mining colony, looking for these graffiti freaks, in the video section, I've shared the video of this place. I hope to enjoy NOFILTER NOEDITION
  8. 4 points
    This place was a restaurant, incredible restaurant!!
  9. 4 points
    I want to tell a funny story that happened recently in Luxembourg city. We decided to climb a crane. When we were at the top, someone spotted us and apparently called police, but we left before they arrived. What happened further. We cleaned our clothes, and after a while decided to go home, but we were too lazy to walk around the district and just passed by the construction site again. I noticed a police car next to the entrance. While driving away, they saw us, stopped and started asking: - Were that you who just climbed a crane here? - No. That's not us. - Are you sure? - Yes, we are. After that they let us go))) I'd like to write a positive feedback on the work of our police, really)
  10. 3 points
    Town Mansion History The Town Mansion was originally built in 1912 by a wealthy petroleum importer. During the early 20th century, the area in which the mansion was built, had become a hub for many rich German families in the early 1900's. By 1918, once the First World War had come to an end and the town was heavily damaged by the intense bombing raids at the start of the war and then German occupation of Belgium in 1914. Only two houses in that street survived, the Town Mansion being one of those. It was then later occupied by a Belgium shipbuilder until the late 1960's, when it was used as an office space. The mansion was abandoned in 1991 and hasn't been formally resided in since. Visit Visited with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M and a non forum member. As I recall it was a particularly hot spring day and we all excited to see this location, partly to escape from the intense heat. Once we got inside we spent a short amount of time wandering around before we eagerly started taking our pictures. I can confidentially say that this is one of the grandest mansions in Belgium I have visited. I did wonder what the lives of the families that once inhabited it were like and the memories they must have had. It was a very enjoyable explore for me and as always, I hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading
  11. 3 points
    I know this place has been done many times before but it is right up my alley and was a tantalizing temptation whilst the rest of the family slept/swam in the villa pool. Thanks for the tip from a fellow member here. The last report/intel from here was 2014 so it has been a while. Things have changed security wise. The holes are patched up and there are 2 new heras style fences inside the main boundary. The main problem with these was that the point of tackling them was very exposed to the street and adjacent dock. Inside, not much has changed. The 'slot window' access point was amusing, the width being about an inch narrower than my back to chest distance and the height being about 4inches shorter than my groin to shoulder height. It took some contorting, and at one point I thought I was well and truly stuck, but in the end, I managed-I was too close to give up. 6am start meant it was a bit dark for photography. By the time I got out, the families were on their balconies and I yelled Ola to them as I jumped over the 4th and final barrier to safety. It was constructed in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún. Running gear and T/G were provided by Metropolitan Vickers. In 1986 The Spanish government commissioned a new Powerplant around 10km away on the other side of the bay. The plant was closed in 1991/2. The 2 rooms I really came for-
  12. 3 points
    Established in 1926, G.L. Murphy was a family run business and supplied bespoke machinery to the tanning industry, as well as building rag cutting and cable stripping machinery. The company also provide refurbishment and renovation works for various machinery types.
  13. 3 points
    After hearing about the permanent closure of this well known super store giant, we felt like a part of our childhood was gone forever. In the store we visited, we found the names of those loyal workers written on the wall with one of those people having worked there for 20 years, but unfortunately we couldn't go back and get a photo due to my camera running out of juice. But all is not lost as there is a full video on my friend's youtube channel so check it out! Here are the best photos we managed to get, thanks for looking. C
  14. 3 points
    I took some on my phone. Next time I will try to bring a camera. I usually don't take it for urbex because almost every time I end up running away from someone. I don't want to crash it) One conclusion that I made, if anyone wants to climb cranes in Luxembourg, do it after 1am. Better after 2am. Responsible neighbors are everywhere! Out of 3 cranes that we did recently cops were called twice.
  15. 2 points
    Built in 1871 but had been refurbished at some point. Now, I don't do heights.. So I was chuffed to see my mate practically run towards it in excitement and go first. It was pretty high and the grated floor was not ideal if you wanted to avoid looking down. The tower probably stands around 40-50 ft but exact measurements are unknown at this point. Apart from the odd clanging of metal under our footsteps and how wobbly it was, it was a good first climb like this for me! Got some snaps as usual, enjoy!
  16. 2 points
    Here to show how the s7 camera can be a useful device for any explorer that's not willing to carry equipment to high places or hard to access areas. None of these are edited in any way. Enjoy C Particularly like this sign. It says the same thing either way.. <<<
  17. 2 points
    A little gem of a place ...went here when it was guarded by a very irate bull lol
  18. 2 points
    This happened a couple days after Vienna, but hell, yes! Our community is so small))) In Vienna I told a story about another crane, where the neighbor also called cops, but patrol didn't see us)
  19. 2 points
    Hi, something about Libava. I'm sorry for my bad English. Libavá is a military space in the Czech Republic with an area of 320km2. There are several dozen mines there. The slate has been cultivated here since the 16th century and has left its remains in the landscape. Before World War II there were 24 villages. Since 1946, all public space has been inaccessible. The army is being trained here and entry is strictly forbidden. Slate bearing on the Olomouc Hill is one of the largest in Central Europe. According to surveys from 1947, the power reaches up to 100 m. The slate was broken in the 16th century, the extraction was gained after 1832. In 1889, due to the long and hard winters, which considerably reduced the surface mining, deep mining was started; down to 500 miners worked. In the years 1915-1932, mining was stopped, then about 150 employees worked (under WWII for two hundred prisoners of war). Mining was terminated after the establishment of military space. Attempts to rebuild mining took place in 1992-94, a new exploration pit was thrown out, but the mismatch of potential extraction with the military drilling regime was cut off from plans. I managed to get into one mine where it was mined by 2002. The mine is not directly in the military space, but corridors that are several kilometers long lead there. The mine has 3 floors. The top floor is only 200 meters long and it has a 50-meter deep shaft that serves for ventilation. 2nd floor has a covered entrance, it can only be reached from the 1st floor using climbing equipment (the connection is 30 meters high). I shot from this video, trying to capture the underground in all its beauty. Enjoy
  20. 2 points
    Nice pictures) That's what I can add from my side)
  21. 1 point
    Hi all. We have invested in a new camera and went out during the night to see how well it can handle the low light images. The result was actually rather impressive! So please enjoy the snaps we managed to get. It isn't a new area, but it is a good place to get some shots. Feel free to let us know which pic you guys like! Keep in touch to see some new places real soon. Cheers, C
  22. 1 point
    Hasn't changed much in all those years. The royal navy chopper is cool
  23. 1 point
    Really cool place and nice pictures! First I read "abandoned bacon" ...
  24. 1 point
    History Ladybower was built between 1935 and 1943 by the Derwent Valley Water Board to supplement the other two reservoirs in supplying the water needs of the East Midlands. It took a further two years to fill (1945). The dam differs from the Howden Reservoir and Derwent Reservoir in that it is a clay-cored earth embankment, and not a solid masonry dam. Below the dam is a cut-off trench 180 feet (55 m) deep and 6 feet (1.8 m) wide filled with concrete, stretching 500 feet (150 m) into the hills each side, to stop water leaking round the dam. The dam wall was built by Richard Baillie and Sons, a Scottish company. The two viaducts, Ashopton and Ladybower, needed to carry the trunk roads over the reservoir were built by the London firm of Holloways, using a steel frame clad in concrete. The project was delayed when the Second World War broke out in 1939, making labour and raw materials scarce. But construction was continued due to the strategic importance of maintaining supplies. King George VI, accompanied by Queen Elizabeth, formally opened the reservoir on 25 September 1945. During the 1990s the wall was raised and strengthened to reduce the risk of over-topping in a major flood. The original dam wall contains 100,000 tons of concrete, over one million tons of earth and 100,000 tons of clay for the core. The upstream face is stone faced. Materials were brought to the site on the Derwent Valley Water Board's own branch line and their sidings off the main line in theHope Valley. The dam's design is unusual in having two totally enclosed bellmouth overflows (locally named the "plugholes") at the side of the wall. These are stone and of 80 feet (24 m) diameter with outlets of 15 feet (4.6 m) diameter. Each discharges via its own valve house at the base of the dam. The overflows originally had walkways around them but they were dismantled many years ago. The bell mouths are often completely out of the water and are only rarely submerged, often after heavy rainfall or flooding. Explore On our way from Manchester, back to Leicester, I decided to take the car I was in, over Snake Pass. We were an hour ahead of UrbanCaving's car and I didn't have a key to his house, so there was no rush back to middle England. Beautiful road and after a couple of stops for photos, we were coming towards Ladybower Reservoir. So I posed the question, "As we're here, why not?" I've wanted to do this beauty for years, each time I've been in the area, the bellmouths have been flowing well. After weeks of little to no rain, we had our chance to strike. The general opinion was "Fuck it, why not?" So we pulled into the car park, got the camera kit on and headed on our way. Once in, I was gobsmacked with the size. And the echo. Awesome sneaky explore which put us behind schedule by an hour (sorry UrbanCaving). Really enjoyed this one, certainly worth the lateness. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  25. 1 point
    OMG I love those dolls Let's see what I have... hmm just 1.
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