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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/07/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    A location I did on my own . After a nice walk I reached the site. Some parts of there seems still t be in use. One building had some new looking alarms and no windows were damaged. First building I tried seems lead to nothing. Walked in a cellar with still a lot of cables, a new looking fusebox and no trash. There was no way to go further up so I tried the other buildings. Still needed to do some climbing but then the explore could start. It looked like a small coal mine the closes a few decades ago. Spent there a few hours. At one moment there was a car going over the terrain. Not sure if it was security or not but I waited hidden in a dark corner of the building for some time. Nothing happened and I started going to the exit. Hope you enjoy the picture. 1 I was hooked IMG_2740-Pano-Edit-2 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 spin that wheel IMG_2939 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 total control IMG_2929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 the curtains closed for this mine IMG_2924 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 no errors IMG_2897-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 to much tension IMG_2888 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 gear up IMG_2852-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 spin me arround IMG_2829-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 puch it IMG_2798-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 goodbye IMG_2844-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  2. 2 points
    It's been a long time that I posted something here. Missing the time for the editing of the photo's. This was my last explore and it was an underground adventure with the same partner of all the underground explores. It's was an iron mine that closed several decades ago like many others in that neighbourhood.It was a nice walk to find an entrance (not the main entrance ). It was inside warmer than outside. This time only one level explored but probably there are more entry's because there was also some kind of elevator (not found thou but other explorer did). There were a lot of collapses places. All the timber was parished and the metal well rusted. Also some cracks in the ceiling. Nice that there were some painted street names on the wall (some in German, other in French). There was every ware since of life ( fungi's, in white and yellow). Animal bones, one bat and animal excrements that turned in something fluffy by the fungi that were growing on that). For the rest the mine was well stripped of almost all the rails and cables. But never the less, a nice trip. 1 it's going to be a bumpy ride IMG_3050 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 hold on to the railing IMG_3048-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 end of the line IMG_3045-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 big pulley (fisheye) IMG_3041-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 tunnel of fungi life in white and yellow IMG_3037-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 that cart didn't make it out IMG_3034 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 stack 'm up IMG_3031 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 light in the" pouderie" IMG_3026-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 the main tunnel IMG_3009-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 iron bows IMG_3014 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 dancing on the ceiling IMG_3018-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  3. 1 point
    Whilst in Leeds with @Hydro3xploric and @Butters we came across a old office building which had recently been kitted out with a full set of scaffolding due to a cool £1.5m investment by JM Construction who intend on converting the vacant 5 storey city center office building into 60 residential 1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Spotting a alarm box flashing at the bottom we chanced it and a few minutes later we was staring at the skyline of central Leeds from a perspective we hadn't seen before. I don't know what it is about city's and rooftops but they are always brilliant places to sit back and chill for a moment or two. The building joined onto this is Called Crispin Lofts and is apparently partially owned by Mel B! I wanted to try getting around to the front but this meant sneaking by a living room window and not wanting to disrupt Scary Spice I grabbed a quick one and retreated External grabbed from google (Crispin Lofts on the left and the roof we was on to the right) And a few more from a roof we spotted just over the road ] Cheers for looking
  4. 1 point
    One I did on my own. Was in that neighbourhood on a non urbex occasion. Was travelling light with only the camera and my tripod. Parked the car some distance away and walked over there. Once inside it was surprisingly quit busy there (I thing 8 persons) in a closed shop). One of the persons was carting a baby. It looked like a family day out to me. Went upstairs and waited to come down when the people were gone. Strange to see so much stuff still in the shelf's. 1 IMG_3003-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_2977-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_2958-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2990-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2998-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_2981-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_2961-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 IMG_2960-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  5. 1 point
    I know it's been posted to death, but I thought I'd post anyway.. During the Second World War, high explosive and incendiary bombs were stored in the old quarry, which was chosen because it was accessible by road and railway. Also, its remoteness meant there was a reduced risk to the public if there had been an explosion. Slate waste was spread over the bomb store to camouflage it from German planes. It’s estimated that the storage area inside the quarry was equivalent to two football pitches. The bombs were unloaded in the reconfigured railway sidings after being brought by train directly from the munitions factories where they were made. In the old slate sheds on the site, women workers filled ammunition belts with rounds of bullets for machine guns. When an RAF airbase needed ammunition for its planes, an order would be sent through to Glyn Rhonwy and be delivered by road or by rail. After the war, the tens of thousands of tons of armaments that had not been used were moved to a nearby quarry and detonated, resulting in thick black smoke obscuring the mountains. In the 1950s, a lake formed in the hollow left by the earlier quarrying. The water was removed when specialists began, in 1969, the long process of removing the remaining explosives and triggers. Video here: https://youtu.be/Mzociz6skcM
  6. 1 point
    Originally opened in 1833 as Connaght District Lunatic Asylum, later changing its name. I found a very interesting write up on the below link, which is where I copied this - It was intended for the care of ‘curable lunatics’ and opened in a spirit of optimism with regard to its progressive role in public health. Its history, however, is one of continual struggle: to prevent the admission of unsuitable cases, to secure additional funding and to offer reasonable standards of care under difficult conditions. In common with the majority of other District Asylums, the CDLA was continually overcrowded, housing in November 1900, for example, 1,165 patients in accommodation designed to hold 840. https://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/tales-from-the-big-house-the-connacht-district-lunatic-asylum-in-the-late-nineteenth-century/ Exactly a year ago I went over to Ireland with pretty much just 2 locations I was desperately keen to visit. After failing to find any access at the first (another asylum) I drove west. It was a lovely bright, autumnal day and eventually I found myself inside. All was fine for 10-15 minutes until I turned round to find myself face-to-face with a gentleman who I guess was a caretaker of sorts. I hadn't heard him make any noise to alert me he was there and so I was in a mild state of shock! He told me that there had been some recent vandalism but after a few minutes of chatting I managed to persuade him not to evict me or alert the authorities. For that I was incredibly grateful. Here is my collection (a bit corridor-heavy)
  7. 1 point
    In the forest sits this stone building, I can't find any info on it other that it's sitting on a settlement mound. Video.. https://youtu.be/nGuRNOeRuA8
  8. 1 point
    A nice and fully furnished Maison in a small village in France.
  9. 1 point
    So back in August (yes I'm slow as ever!); a non-explorer friend and myself visited The Springs in Wallingford, which at the time was a bit of a local tourist trap; but it was an afternoon out! It had really dawned on me at this point which way this hobby is going these days. No word of a lie; there was at least 15 people in that hotel, all this new wave of "YouTube Explorer" we all have our opinions of. They were all nice enough there and then, but a couple were very, very loud and had small children with them. Inevitably, a member of staff of the live Golf Course this was on came and flushed everyone out, myself and my friend sat in an old en-suite upstairs and waited for it to die down. After that; we explored for an hour and a half or so; not much to see here, fairly plain, but it was an enjoyable day out. Upon exit the same Golf Course Staff found us, but were polite and we were on our way. The original build dates back to 1874; a Mock Tudor Style building, this Victorian Villa has been massively altered and extended from the original. Rock Star Ian Gillan of Deep Purple, purchased the villa in 1973 and was behind its and installed a guitar shaped swimming pool in the grounds behind the building before its later conversion into a 32 bedroom hotel. The last owners bought the hotel in 1995 and added a large golf course and club to the grounds. The Springs finally closed in 2014 after the owners could no longer afford the vast upkeep. The Golf Club however; voted one of the best in Oxfordshire is still open. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 As Always Guys, Thank You. More Hotel At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674868589418
  10. 1 point
    I had been waiting to do this one for a month or so; but simply hadn't found the time to hop on the M40 and up to Brum. It was a good opportunity to meet up with some explorers whom I have been chatting to for the best part of ten years or so and do an explore at the same time! We arrived here mid morning one Sunday and once inside; the beauty of the place was revealed! I really loved this place. Again though; it was full of the new age era of explorers; about a dozen of them, some videoing and some just shooting photos. It's rare you bump into a person on explores, but lately its been every explore. This one was flavour of the month back in the summer though!! After the explore, we went to Costco for a cheap lunch in the canteen there and had a nice, chilled drive around the local area looking for other sites The Hall, built between 1903 and 1904 by architects Ewan Harper and James Harper and the terracotta was made by Gibbs and Canning ltd of Tamworth, is situated at the northern end of Corporation Street in Birmingham. The hall is a 3 storey red brick and terracotta building with Grade II Listing on it, with 2000 seats in the main halll over 30 additional rooms including 3 school halls. By 1991, the building had been converted into a nightclub which closed in 2002, but reopened as the Q Club in 2007. This club's last event at the premises was "Flashback" in 2011. During its time as a Night Club 3 deaths were reported. -A punter jumped off the tower in 1998 -A clubber OD'd in 2000 -A stabbing outside in 2008. The Club reopened in 2012, but closed in 2016. In 2018; Birmingham city council granted planning permission to convert it into a 147 room hotel costing £35 million. Works have begun and are expected to be complete by 2020. I just love the contrast between old and new here; with the older Methodists Hall and the big, modern buildings springing up around it. There is a live part of the building and as we were there, a Gospel Band were practicing literally behind the wall; a strong scent of Jerk Chicken was filling the rooms of the abandoned part. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Thanks for Looking, more of the Hall at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674880523028
  11. 1 point
    Had a look in here earlier in the year after an fail near by. A grand example of dereliction on the outside and a crumbing mess on the inside. Nice little wander as it turned out. There is enough features and bits still knocking about to make it interesting and I enjoyed having a look around and getting some snaps. Visited with non member Paul. History The Crown opened in 1899 as the Lyceum Theatre. The intention was to provide a luxury theatre for Shakespeare productions and drama as well as revue. It is a landmark building in the town of Eccles in a vaguely Elizabethan Style with pilasters and mullioned windows. The facade is constructed of moulded red brick of five storeys with terracotta dressings to three high arched windows at first floor. It is richly decorated, and has an asymmetrically placed short corner tower. This once had a pyramidal roof and the parapet was topped with square pinnacles. The cast iron copy still survives, now encased. The auditorium was designed with three balconies, supported by four columns. The ornamentation of the proscenium comprised an allegorical representation of Shakespeare's 'Seven Ages of Man'. The act drop was a facsimile of Beverley's noted work for the opening of the Theatre Royal (Manchester) in 1845 - a Grecian subject painted by Mr Keith. Becoming a cinema in 1932, it was later adapted for Cinemascope, ending stage use. Converted for bingo in 1963, by the late 1980s it was reported to be falling into disrepair internally. The exterior is largely intact, apart from the stage house which has been partly demolished. Planning permission was given in 2005 - and again in 2008 - for partial demolition (retaining the facade) and development of apartments behind. Since then the building has become more dilapidated and a new planning application for a residential and retail development submitted in 2016 proposes complete demolition of the theatre. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157693704356862/with/42124774351/
  12. 1 point
    Been waiting all week to go here only to find it's all been boarded back . so just some from the outside.☹️
  13. 1 point
    This juwelen factory was build more then 100 years ago. Now its abandoned for around 10 years.
  14. 1 point
    In a tram depot you find these unused and rotted trams. It was not possible to make more pics, because the security from the tram depot get us.
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    Not a bad little mooch this one. Quite a lot of area to cover with most of it being stripped unfortunately but, there is still stuff to see and some nice decay in parts. It seems the building was used to make carpet underlay form 2002 until 2013. I guess its been abandoned since then. Visited with non member Paul. History The Arrol-Johnston Motor Co., which had been in operation since 1896, opened its Dumfries factory at Heathhall in July 1913. The manager, Thomas Charles Pullinger, had been inspired by the Albert Kahn designed factories of Henry Ford in America. Kahn provided the design for the Dumfries factory, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to Ford's Highland Park factory in Detroit. The Heathhall factory was said to be the most advanced light engineering factory of its day in Scotland. The site was purchased by the North British Rubber Company in 1946. It then became Uniroyal Ltd in the 60's, and in 1987 changed yet again to the British subsidiary of the Gates Rubber Company. It has been known as Interfloor since 2002. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
  17. 1 point
    Lol, Thought the same myself bud 😃 A right state now, still a few bits to have a look at though.
  18. 1 point
    Really like the tiling on the floors, agree with what Andy said too.. a nice little touch there. I like it, is that a wardrobe in pic 8 because its bloody huge!
  19. 1 point
    Part II of the location
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    awesome that matey. Stunning pics of a beutifull place. Thanks for report.
  22. 1 point
    I see another football has appeared since I went! Really nice report there. Very thorough, I'm especially liking the ceiling shot.
  23. 1 point
    Good find that! Nice to see something new as well
  24. 1 point
    I like the millstone. As a decorative element it serves as a nice reminder of the building's past.
  25. 0 points
    That's awesome Andy. Did you try on the dress?
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