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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    We all know the history of this place and with so many reports going up recently but here is a short version. Inspired by Tumbles i decided to shoot some old BW Film. History Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. Whitchurch Hospital finally closed its doors in April, 2016 and is due to be stripped down and dismantled. Thanks for looking
  2. 4 points
    (Image Heavy) Browns Island is located on a river in the Midwest, the island has a long, interesting history. It was noted by George Washington during his travels, and Meriwether Lewis from the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped there in 1803, on the site there's an ancient Native mound, and early petroglyphs existed on the head of the island. For around 100 years the island was privately owned and farmed until 1957, when a steel company bought it to build a coke plant. There was also a mail plane crash on the island in 1933 that killed the pilot and passenger. In Dec of 1972, right before the Coke Ovens started operating, there was a gas explosion which killed 21 construction workers, the oven were operational until 1982, eventually, they were demolished and the island sold slag for commercial use until 2008. Although there were no ovens standing, it was still an interesting explore, my neighbor and grandfather worked here when the Mill used it. I was very fortunate to get permission to go on it
  3. 4 points
    This doctor's office with adjoining villa has been empty for almost a quarter of a century. The last records are from 1994.
  4. 2 points
    According to a report in August 2018 there were 18 pubs closing in the UK every week with 476 closures in the first 6 months of that year. It's a sobering (sorry) thought for someone like me who appreciates an ale or six in a nice hostelry. There are records showing The Bridge Inn here going back to around 1875 although how far back it dates is unclear. It closed permanently in 2013 and planning permission was given for change of use. I had the feeling that work was starting on redeveloping it when I was there. The Welsh name is Tafarn Y Bont - I wouldn't say there's anything that makes it distinctly Welsh - but its a good example of a traditional British pub which still has a few old features. It was nice that it seemed pretty untouched in the years since it closed.
  5. 1 point
    We visited this italian monastery this year. It' seems to be a peaceful place so we decided to sleep there (inside the car) . It's build on a hill with a nice view, also at night. Everything is open and it looks like that it's absolutely o.k. to visit it cause also normal italien people come to visit it. We were pretty lucky with the weather this morning with much of mist. There is a huge roof terrace where I used my drone to make some pictures and videos. Sadly I lost my drone on this italy trip so I can't show You the stuff I made from bird's eye view. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  6. 1 point
    The hostel on the mountain, opened in the 1960s or earlier, was a simple accommodation. Last guest reviews complain about lack of comfort and high prices for an overnight stay. Last one night in a 5-bed room cost 40 euros per person. In the dining room there was no selection of different meals to order, but only a simple daily special for all. In the summer of 2011, the hostel was finally closed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  7. 1 point
    Closed due to two local schools merging and getting a newly built school to move into Planning permission has been given to demolish the site and build houses Visited with the elusive , and thanks for the tipoff K On with the snaps thanks for looking
  8. 1 point
    During the Cold War, this bunker was built as an auxiliary hospital. The overlying school was opened in the 60s while the hospital was officially inaugurated in the 80s. It offered 2,370 places and never went into operation. At the turn of the millennium, it was relieved of its responsibilities, the inventory transferred to other states, and the hospital will be soon demolished.
  9. 1 point
    The office building of the Textima company in east germany was left behind with most of the stuff inside after the wall was fallen. Really beautiful to see the natural decay without much of vandalism. We couldn't see everything of the building cause the demolishing had already started while we have been inside. The only part which was saved is the old Textima logo. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  10. 1 point
    In classic Harry style; this forms part of another explore backlog! I visited here in November 2018 with Mookster. It formed part of a little Midland Roadtrip we did that day. We all know what to expect with this place; its pretty pillaged now, access was a doddle and it was full of other explorers; something which seems to be a much more frequent occurrence these days! We met some really nice people here and had a relaxed half hour or so before moving to the next site. The Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903 and was known a local landmark in Birmingham. Tea production began here in the 30's; and survived bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. in 1968; Typhoo merged with Schweppes and with Cadbury the following year, forming Cadbury-Schweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978 as a tea making facility; but remained open as a clothes warehouse until around 2008. The grounds, which are currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park (very handy for exploring!), have been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to turn the site into a brand new university campus for the Birmingham City University. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704773968425
  11. 1 point
    This is my personal sweet spot. It is an abandoned cement factory. It was built in 1949 and was the big employer of the residents in the nearby small town. After ww2 the need for cement was enormous due to the building of new houses. It was closed in 1981, after that some recycling experiments were done until the place was completely abandoned in 2003.
  12. 1 point
    The history of the Albanian Navy dates back to 1925, following the creation of the Albanian Republic. Albanian naval forces operate out of two main bases; Bishti-i-Palles in Durrës, and Pasha Liman in Vlorë, with four reserve bases respectively in Shëngjin, Porto Palermo, Saranda and a submarine base on Sazan island. The vessels of the Albanian naval force are mostly patrol craft and support craft as well as four whisky class submarines (Soviet Union built in the early Cold War period) which have been taken out of service at Pasha Liman. In Shëngjin a Soviet built minesweeper M-111 and an AFD-115 gunship remain abandoned at the entrance to a bunker. The Albanian navy still operates out of Shëngjin in a low capacity so it's still an active military zone but you are allowed to drive through it to reach a beach resort on the other side. Handy for us! Visited with adders, extreme_ironing, otter and reenie. Here's what we found.... AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M-111 - A mine warfare ship designed for the location of and destruction of naval mines which combines the role of a minesweeper and minehunter in one hull. Minesweepers are equipped with mechanical or electrical devices, known as "sweeps", for disabling mines, so waterways are maintained clear for safe shipping. This one appears to have been disused since 1996 (the date of a calendar on board), just prior to the Albanian civil war, when many vessels of the Albanian navy were seriously damaged. Behind it sits this half-submerged AFD P115 - Albanian Navy gunship (Chinese type 62 "Shanghai-II") which has had its 57mm gun mount removed They sit in front of the entrance to a navigable bunker which was inaccessible. Another entrance parallel was also sealed although we reached the blast door for that one The AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M111 was named after Mujo Ulqinaku, an Albanian sergeant of the Royal Albanian Navy, known for his resistance to the Italian forces during the Italian Invasion of Albania in 1939. Armed with only a machine gun, he was placed at the centre of the defense line and fought uninterruptedly until he was eventually killed by an artillery shell from an Italian warship in the last hour of the battle. He was given the People's Hero of Albania award posthumously. On board the AFD - M111 An old gun at the front You can see an active patrol boat moored up on the left of the shot Inside the AFD - M111 Communications cabin A small engine room Hatches and squat toilets Kitchen All the cabins were locked except for this one Some old military posters Back on land, this AFD S104 - Huchuan class 'motor torpedo boat' is waiting to be scrapped. Powered by Soviet-era engines, these hydrofoil-equipped boats are capable of 50 knots (93 km/h; 58 mph) and carry two torpedo tubes for torpedoes, with some known to be armed with naval mines. A few dilapidated buildings remain nearby This building to the left was manned but we were just out of view so we took a quick peek at these old military vehicles Some rusty torpedoes lay on the ground alongside one of them A couple of old trucks overgrown by vegetation above the bunker. We were aware of someone from the base heading in our direction at this point so we hopped in the car and made tracks We made it to the beach resort on the other side of the military zone where unfortunately the pigs were waiting for us. Thankfully they just grunted a bit and we were on our way 😮 Just in time to catch the sunset! Thanks for looking
  13. 1 point
    This is my first post on here, and these were taken with a cell camera, but I found this site interesting. This is a former control site for a Nike Missile Base that was part of a defense ring around a major city during the Cold War. The location where the missiles were stored/lauched in a few miles away and in use. Eventually this was used as a State National Guard Unit until abandoned around 1996. The night photos are of 2nd base in this region which is partially used
  14. 1 point
    HISTORY Tenterden Town railway station is a heritage railway station on the Kent and East Sussex Railway in Tenterden, Kent, England. When the railway line first opened in 1900, Rolvenden Station was known as "Tenterden". Its name was changed when the line extended north three years later and a station closer to Tenterden was constructed. The new Tenterden Town station opened on 16 March 1903.The line closed for regular passenger services on 4 January 1954 and all traffic in 1961. It reopened on 3 February 1974 under the aegis of the Tenterden Railway Company which bought the line between Tenterden and Bodiam. The station now houses the KESR's Carriage and Wagon works, and the Colonel Stephens Museum is located nearby. EXPLORE So we set out on our explore with a list of places We wanted to check out. After a few not amounting to much and the next couple being total fails, we parked up and regrouped! The Tenterden site had been on my radar for a while (although I couldn’t be 100% about it’s location) so after a little discussion we decided to take a chance and head out to try and find the Lost Railway and its Train Graveyard. We headed toward the closest point by road, parked up and set off along a short path way. The area was really quiet apart from the odd dog walker. After literally five minutes we knew we were in the right place and could see the abandoned trains hidden amongst the trees. Access was easy literally a small hop over the fence and down the bank, there they were! Its the first time any of us had ever done an explore of this nature and it was amazing... Anyway here are some of the pictures we took throughout the explore. Thanks for reading 😊
  15. 1 point
    There were four different types of munitions factory: Engineering factories producing the metal casings for bombs and shells or, in some instances, producing parts, rifles, guns and tanks. Small-arms factories producing the bullet casings. (These factories were often existing engineering factories turned over to war production.) Explosive factories manufacturing various explosive agents. Filling factories to fill the bomb and shell casings with the explosives. This site produced Cordite and was chosen for its distance from German bomber bases in Europe, while having good rail networks and a rural location that provided a good supply of labour. This ROF employed circa 13000 during WW2 mainly women. The Ministry of Works built a large water abstraction and treatment plant , just to supply the plant. To connect the site to the national rail network, a large marshalling yard of 10 separate roads was constructed, and these connected to the works' internal network of rail lines. A passenger platform was built for military usage. All the cordite produced at the plant was taken by these sidings to Crewe. The site was well defended, both on the ground and from the air; several Type 22 Pillboxes and Type 24 Pillboxes and the entire site was under a mile away from RAF base, which was home to at least one fighter squadron, for defending the region's industrial assets from bomber attack.
  16. 1 point
    Brilliant images...Really like seeing the flakey paintwork. Great to see these places being documented before they are lost.
  17. 1 point
    RAF Coningsby is a partially active RAF base and was opened in 1940 as a bomber station. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find more about the history of this place. So I don't know when the abandoned part has been closed. Stupidly I had forgotten the plate of my tripod at home. That's why I had to take the photos without a tripod and with a higher ISO setting. Visited with @The_Raw and others, before we joined the "End of summer party" in September last year. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 - The_Raw's new friend 46 47 48
  18. 1 point
    This place is high on my to do list for 2019 and seeing this report makes me want to go even more! Fantastic photographs and very well covered as always @Andy. An interesting story regarding the globe as well, I'd heard it had been stolen and was a bit disappointed. I've seen a lot of pictures recently with the globe in it so it would make sense it has been replaced, glad to see there's still some good people left in the community!
  19. 1 point
    Great photos! Looks like a good mine to explore
  20. 1 point
  21. 1 point
    It sure was. Makes you think about the men who had to work there.
  22. 1 point
    Looks like a great exploration!
  23. 1 point
    The second part of the hospital.
  24. 1 point
    Cool place Andy, nice images there.
  25. 1 point
    I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
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