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  1. 12 points
    One of the more fun powerplant explores i ever did. This location was pretty active and there was still a lot of electronics and lights turned on. I've been here twice, and still didn't have the chance to see the whole location. The highlights of these place (for me) are the modern controlroom with all the screens, photographing the lights outside on the roof, climbing the 143m/469feet chimneys (twice) and watching the security car doing its rounds on the terrain from the chimney. Combine this with great weather and great friends, and this makes it one of my favorite locations. Oh, and i also shot some photos: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  2. 11 points
    Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  3. 10 points
    One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  4. 10 points
    Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  5. 10 points
    To discover such a time capsule always gives you a lot of pleasure. Whereby you can not speak of small here, because in this beautiful place there were many motifs over several floors. Starting with a huge cellar that was filled to the ceiling with unused materials, over several floors that were used for the production of clothing to an attic that was converted into a warehouse disused for sewing machines. However, the long history of the company is relatively fast to tell. A brave entrepreneur founded a small factory in the mid-19th century whose productivity could be increased very quickly. When the GDR emerged, the company was expropriated to disappear after the turnaround because they had missed the ravages of time. Meanwhile, you can not enjoy this time capsule so much, because after the discovery of the object, it was not long before much was destroyed and stolen, which ultimately led to the city secured the building and walled the entrances. More pictures of this huge location can be found here -> http://www.patrick-hertel.de/veb-dessous/
  6. 9 points
    An abandoned beacon in the baltic sea. There are two of it. One 1000m and the other one in 4000m distance from the runway. Ther were used to enlarge the range of the runway ...so the pilots could navigate easier to the short runway. Build and used by the NVA. The army of the former GDR... (DDR).
  7. 9 points
    History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  8. 9 points
    I was suppose to visit this location with several friends 7 yrs ago but it got cancelled and I don't recall why. Then shortly after people were getting arrested here and it was off the list by most explorers. A couple years ago photos started popping up from here so I planned a visit. The only bad part was I no longer lived a couple hours away and was now about 7 so it was quite a trip. I managed to get here twice thankfully and these photos are from both trips. It's a very old campus which was started in 1828 for the rich mentally ill and other buildings were built as time progressed. For a time they practiced eugenics here which then became outlawed. The asylum closed in the 70's and was vacant till years later when a few of of the buildings were used as a medium- security prison. It was then sold to a developer who has converted several of the buildings to apartments and continues to do so. This place is most known for it's lovely spiral staircase in the admin building. It seems most come here , shoot that and leave.....but there's so much more here that is photo worthy in that building as well as the others. It's impossible to walk quietly in here as the old wooden floors creak with every step...it was really annoying trying to be stealthy. Also a lot of the floors and walls are leaning so badly that at times it felt like you were in a fun house with the odd angles. However having said that everything is in excellent condition here with only a few minor areas with some water/weather damage. Side note the patient cemetery is also located on the grounds which is in this set.
  9. 9 points
    This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  10. 9 points
    Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  11. 9 points
    On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  12. 8 points
    The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  13. 8 points
    The old primary school has apparently been abandoned for quite some time. Crumbling plaster is leading the way. Decay as far as the eye can see. Now and then friendly yet strong reminders written somewhere: "Instortingsgevaar" (danger of collapse). Certain areas of the school building are definitely in a pretty bad condition which is obvious even without knowledge in statics. Remnants of the former school life are scattered throughout the whole building. Toys, photos of former students as well as old books. All these things just intensify the frozen in time atmosphere. A beautiful little place left to rot right in the middle of active school grounds. That´s the reason we chose the summer holidays for our visit. Despite of that the grounds were really busy that day. Apparently, preparations for the upcoming school year took place. Sneaking into the building was quite easy, whereas sneaking outside unseen became an almost undoable task. While taking photos inside the grounds had become more and more busy. The only chance was trying to head towards the exit as fast as possible. And so the inevitable happened. Only few steps after leaving our building we heard a loud "Hey" behind us. Two workers appeared but couldn´t hide their smiles. Still feeling relief a woman, probably the headmaster, came out of the active school building opposite of ours and shouted angrily at us threatening us to call the police. Disappearing as fast as possible was the only option now. Barbed wire or not. After a detour to our car and an adrenaline level slowly going back to normal we finally escaped safely. A brief look back to our arrival: while searching for a parking space we were watched by an elderly man standing behind his window with his curtains in his hand. He observed us so obviously so that we decided to look for another place to park our car. Yet not before waving at the conspiciously behaving man who responded by waving back at us right away. So better never tend to underestimate the local "security". 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  14. 8 points
    First report here, the well-known Chateau wolfenstein. Lost somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes, the castle was built 1931 by a rich Baron. It has many use throught the years, hospital, command centre during the war, care home for soldiers and, apparently some kind of jail for war and politic prisonners. Now, it 's still a part a the hospital complex but it is unused, except for a room where the hospital stocks some servers.
  15. 8 points
    It was a very long trip on this day - 23.5 hours on the road, 1480 km driven... But it was worth it. In the afternoon we reached our third place, this old house on the outskirts of a small village. From the outside it was already pretty overgrown. Nevertheless, access wasn't difficult. Inside were old furniture, various dolls, a piano, and everything surrounded by beautiful decay. Only the smell of a decaying fox in the entrance area wasn't really pleasant... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  16. 8 points
    Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  17. 8 points
    History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  18. 8 points
    One of my favorites from my first Italy trip. For a industry freak like me it can't get any better then this. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  19. 8 points
    In early 2018 we visited one of the new tunnels of Paris metro which for the moment (May 2018) is still under construction. Recently I was told that this place is no longer accessible due to active works that doesn't stop even at night, so I will publish some pictures. Btw, we managed to get in only from the 2nd try - there is a security guy walking around the construction site (on the street). The new tunnel is 2km long. We walked till the end and on the way back checked out the end of the active line. There were two trains. Soon we heard some noise (like if someone'd open a door) and left the place.
  20. 8 points
    And old 18 century house with had a bank function.The building is stripped of all furniture an will probably be renovated in some future. Needed to be a little bit inventive to gain access to this one. But later I was all alone, with the only sound coming from the people in front of the building. 1 IMG_1541 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_1534-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_1519-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_1488 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_1453 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_1441-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_1450-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  21. 8 points
    Information about this old brewery is rare. It must have been shut down in the late 1990's when the owner built a modern one in order to increase productivity. #1 DSC00779-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC00781-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC00780-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC00788-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC00830-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC00793-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC00797-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC00801-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC00802-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC00804-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC00806-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC00817-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC00825-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  22. 7 points
    We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  23. 7 points
    Red Morgue Hospital History I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. Visit Visited with @darbians on a weekend trip to Belgium. I was really keen to see this one after finding out about it and seeing a few photographs. It was great to see an old hospital in fairly good condition with some items still left, combined with a nice bit of decay. As always, hope you enjoy my photos ? (Spot the rookie error ?) If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  24. 7 points
    In January I visited this abandoned part of a hospital that is still in use. Unfortunately most of the rooms were almost cleared - but nevertheless worth to be shown. #1 DSC09857-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC09858-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC09861-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC09856-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC09832-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC09833-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC09830-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC09862-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC09835-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC09836-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC09828-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC09829-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC09838-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC09841-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC09844-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC09846-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC09850-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC09847-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC09848-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC09851-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC09854-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC09852-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  25. 7 points
    Thanks and yes Forgot to add the old view of the kirk above
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