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  1. 12 points
    Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  2. 12 points
    One of the more fun powerplant explores i ever did. This location was pretty active and there was still a lot of electronics and lights turned on. I've been here twice, and still didn't have the chance to see the whole location. The highlights of these place (for me) are the modern controlroom with all the screens, photographing the lights outside on the roof, climbing the 143m/469feet chimneys (twice) and watching the security car doing its rounds on the terrain from the chimney. Combine this with great weather and great friends, and this makes it one of my favorite locations. Oh, and i also shot some photos: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  3. 11 points
  4. 10 points
    One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  5. 10 points
    To discover such a time capsule always gives you a lot of pleasure. Whereby you can not speak of small here, because in this beautiful place there were many motifs over several floors. Starting with a huge cellar that was filled to the ceiling with unused materials, over several floors that were used for the production of clothing to an attic that was converted into a warehouse disused for sewing machines. However, the long history of the company is relatively fast to tell. A brave entrepreneur founded a small factory in the mid-19th century whose productivity could be increased very quickly. When the GDR emerged, the company was expropriated to disappear after the turnaround because they had missed the ravages of time. Meanwhile, you can not enjoy this time capsule so much, because after the discovery of the object, it was not long before much was destroyed and stolen, which ultimately led to the city secured the building and walled the entrances. More pictures of this huge location can be found here -> http://www.patrick-hertel.de/veb-dessous/
  6. 10 points
    Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you! On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff! The story goes as followed: The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found. When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! I hope you liked it! Let me know what you think! Marco Bontenbal https://pixanpictures.com
  7. 9 points
    History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  8. 9 points
    This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  9. 9 points
    Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  10. 9 points
    On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  11. 9 points
    After a work conference, I decided a trip to the rather nice Belfast Mortuary was in order to help cure the immense hangover I had from drinking many pints and many whiskies the night before. Closed for a while, and slowly disintegrating from the local delinquents attention. Clear and Concise DSC06568 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridges DSC06599 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridge Close Up DSC06602 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC06606 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Scales DSC06566 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stainless Slab DSC06584 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Another View DSC06586 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr# The other slab DSC06572 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Drain DSC06578 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  12. 8 points
    The old primary school has apparently been abandoned for quite some time. Crumbling plaster is leading the way. Decay as far as the eye can see. Now and then friendly yet strong reminders written somewhere: "Instortingsgevaar" (danger of collapse). Certain areas of the school building are definitely in a pretty bad condition which is obvious even without knowledge in statics. Remnants of the former school life are scattered throughout the whole building. Toys, photos of former students as well as old books. All these things just intensify the frozen in time atmosphere. A beautiful little place left to rot right in the middle of active school grounds. That´s the reason we chose the summer holidays for our visit. Despite of that the grounds were really busy that day. Apparently, preparations for the upcoming school year took place. Sneaking into the building was quite easy, whereas sneaking outside unseen became an almost undoable task. While taking photos inside the grounds had become more and more busy. The only chance was trying to head towards the exit as fast as possible. And so the inevitable happened. Only few steps after leaving our building we heard a loud "Hey" behind us. Two workers appeared but couldn´t hide their smiles. Still feeling relief a woman, probably the headmaster, came out of the active school building opposite of ours and shouted angrily at us threatening us to call the police. Disappearing as fast as possible was the only option now. Barbed wire or not. After a detour to our car and an adrenaline level slowly going back to normal we finally escaped safely. A brief look back to our arrival: while searching for a parking space we were watched by an elderly man standing behind his window with his curtains in his hand. He observed us so obviously so that we decided to look for another place to park our car. Yet not before waving at the conspiciously behaving man who responded by waving back at us right away. So better never tend to underestimate the local "security". 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  13. 8 points
    The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  14. 8 points
    Closed German thermal gym.
  15. 8 points
    One of a Kind Acoustic Places ! Never seen anything like this Fuel Storage of the NVA Troops in Germany
  16. 8 points
    Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  17. 8 points
    I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside. One of the areas of this complex was/is a bowling alley which for years was flooded and no one was able to photograph it. However when they were preparing a building beside it to be demoed the water was removed from it. It's completely dark there so no available light except by light painting which I detest This building above they removed the cupolas for what reason I don't know and they are sitting behind fence at the building in the background This building was demoed 2016.
  18. 8 points
    And old 18 century house with had a bank function.The building is stripped of all furniture an will probably be renovated in some future. Needed to be a little bit inventive to gain access to this one. But later I was all alone, with the only sound coming from the people in front of the building. 1 IMG_1541 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_1534-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_1519-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_1488 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_1453 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_1441-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_1450-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  19. 8 points
    Information about this old brewery is rare. It must have been shut down in the late 1990's when the owner built a modern one in order to increase productivity. #1 DSC00779-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC00781-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC00780-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC00788-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC00830-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC00793-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC00797-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC00801-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC00802-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC00804-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC00806-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC00817-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC00825-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  20. 8 points
    Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  21. 8 points
    History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  22. 7 points
    We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  23. 7 points
    This was a fun one. A small part of the hospital is still in use so there were lots of vehicles coming and going. Security kept driving up and down the main road as well like it was groundhog day so we had to stay on our toes. The hospital was built in 1930 for the treatment of people suffering from mental illness. Towards the end of WWII, in 1945, a famous massacre took place here. Seventy five Italian Social Republic soldiers were brought here as prisoners and around 50 of them were brutally executed. Some of them being tied up with wire and crushed under the wheels of two trucks. Anyway, as I was saying, a fun place to hang out, with something to see in most of the buildings. I'd say we got around 75% of the abandoned stuff. Here's some pics: 1. Chapel 2. Not too impressive inside 3. 4. & 5. 6. Beds bolted to the floor 7. 8. 9. Not entirely sure what this was, some kind of meals on wheels type body trolley? 10. 11. Several buildings full of old documents 12. 13. 14. X-ray scans 15. Theatre/Cinema 16. Amazingly the projector has survived Thanks for looking
  24. 7 points
    Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  25. 7 points
    Stoke Hospital Morgue. Been closed a fair while now, been here 3 times and never been able to gain access to this part of it due to it being locked off and being caught by secca once!
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