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  1. 12 points
    The first attempt to visit it was exactly three years ago. However, I didn't feel very well at this time, so I went back to the car after half the way. Not a bad decision, because The_Raw and the others failed then. Now the second attempt, this time with more luck. A really great and impressive building! Visited with @The_Raw & @Miss.Anthrope. History (taken from The_Raw) The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
  2. 11 points
    HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates. Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence) The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966. The original Holloway Prison (public domain image) Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing. Time to start the unofficial tour.... Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds Let's head straight into the cells... Dorm room Single prisoner cell Another dorm room Mural in one of the many winding corridors Twin room Lots of peely paint in some places There were several styles of cell Entrance into the prison... Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass Corridors lead into the prison Each area separated by iron gates Prisoner amenities and facilities Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre. Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use And gym facilities The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians Pharmacy Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls The chapel was large but pretty basic More inmate artwork Mural inside one of the rooms A room for presentations The prison's boiler house Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls High fences divided the exterior areas
  3. 11 points
    History This coal mine was established in 1910 and was funded by the Prussian empire. This facility contained two elevator towers. In 1912 the construction began on a cokes plant right next to the coal mine. In 1943 the mine shut down due to the second world war, after 6 years the mine reopened again. With this reopening there was also a major renovation, with this renovation there was a larger modern elevator added to the facility. In 1998 the facility was bought by a big coal mining corporation which owned 5 other coal mines. In 2008 the 98 year old coal mining facility was closed down by the government. The historic part is currently being restored and the part that was renovated after the war will probably be torn down. Explore The entrance was *access details removed*. when we got in we first went trough a whole system with conveyer belts, after that we ended up in the huge coal washery. after we explored this part we went up into the elevator tower. The tower was 10 floors high so we were quite tired then we were on the tower but it was really worth it, in the tower there was an enormous electrical lift motor which was really nice to take pictures from. It was a really cool place to explore, I really enjoyed it! Thanks for reading and looking!
  4. 11 points
    Red Cross Hospital Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level, a common practice for medical facilities Italy, as the air was fresher up in the mountains. It was it was believed that this held medicinal properties and was more therapeutic which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  5. 10 points
    I was out for a solo exploring day earlier in the year and I decided to head for a mooch around bentwters just to see what I could find what was different to the tour they show people.i actually found quite a bit.it was areally enjoyable to look around.a lot of the place is used as an industrial estate,and its nice to see it being put to use.there is active security there too who drive about..RAF Bentwaters was a former world war two base built in 1942 and was in use by the RAF till 1949 it was then taken over by the Americans who used it till 1993.it had a twin base up the road called RAF Woodbridge.several squadrons were based here over the years.the last being the infamous tank busters the A-10.it was also famous for the Rendlesham forest incident were servicemen from Woddbridge in 1980 saw flashing lights in the sky.it was classed as Britain's Roswell incident.funny most ufo sightings seem to be near American bases THE PLANES On the base is several old planes and helicoptors.a company does these up and sells them.not sure if the company exists still.as the same planes are still there in old photos I have seen online.they were cool to shoot though.my favourite being the two seater black navy harrier. SPECIAL WEAPOS STORES The special weapons storage area is situated behind the regular bomb stores.the regular ones are in use by a company.you know whe you go this area they held some pretty special stuff in here.there was prob nuke heads.CND always descended on Greenham common but in reality I think a lot of the American bases stored nukes.the stores are surrounded by several fence and barb wire and razor wire on top.you enter via a large double gate.once in the gate area number one gate would close and you would be trapped between two.you would then be authorized and allowed in.there is a tower above the gate house with machine gun apertures in there over looking he gate area.further in is a watch tower.and down the other end is a block,this looks like a garage but behind the shutter would be a Humme ready to ride out if under attack.the building also had machine gun apertures fscing in direct line down the main stores.also lots of telegraph poles were dotted around the compound,if Russian helicoptors carrying spetsnaz special forces were to try and land the poles would slow that down.these were serious times in the cold war SITE SECURITY With a base this size security was heavy,i managed to get in the police block,but the dog section was well sealed sadly. THE STAR WARS BUILDING To the rear of the site sit this building what is nicknamed the star wars building.this is because of basically the huge concrete shaped blast walls that surround it.the building itself is basically a block building.this was for the pilots.situated near the pens it was used for debriefing and briefing the pilots and there was toillets and showers and locker rooms,even a small medical room.i learnt after it is hired out now and again. THE VEICHLES Dotted around the airfield is several trucks.some real nice examples on here.shame they are in a state DEPUTY COMMANDER OPERATIONS This block when I looked through the windows looked so good.i was struggling to find a way in and nearly gave up.then I found a small gap and I was in.its one of the most decayed buildings I have been in.you could almost feel the damp and smell it in here.the deputy commander was in charge of being in contact and organisation of operatiox with other countries so basically he would work closely with there NATO aliies.there is a bunker building next door sadly that was a no go. RANDOM AIRFIELD STUFF This was the rules board for civilians visiting around the runway and taxiway areas. At either end of the airfield is a pair of buildings.these would act as a safety line if planes were in trouble.a cable would be pulled up to stop the planes over shooting the runway if they suffered some sort of problem.in the roomy you can still see the hole in the wall and plinth for whatever mechanism was used. nother watch tower to overlook the airfield.this one is in a right dilapidated state. Two of many hangars around the back end of the airfield.most of these had the squadrons insignia on the door
  6. 10 points
    I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
  7. 10 points
    Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers ?
  8. 9 points
    Tskaltubo was a popular spa resort, famous for its healing mineral waters and radon bath treatments. The first sanatoriums with in-patient facilities were built in 1925 and in 1931 Tskaltubo was designated as a spa resort by the Soviet government. Under the communist regime, a spa break was a prescribed, and mostly compulsory, annual respite, as the “right to rest” was inscribed in the Russian constitution. A visit to the doctors could result in being dispatched to somewhere like Lithuania or Georgia where spa towns were renowned for the healing properties of their mineral waters. It was one of Stalin’s favourite vacation spots. During WWII, the hotels were used as hospitals but after the war, their popularity increased and by the 1980s Tskaltubo was one of the most sought-after tourist destinations in the Soviet Union. Georgia’s independence in 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in late December 1991, signalled the collapse of Tskaltubo’s spa industry. Without guests, most of the hotels and resorts were forced to close their doors. Today many of them are home to refugees who fled the conflict in Abkhazia in 92/93 and needed to be rehoused. This one however has been fenced off and remains empty behind a fence with 24 hour security patrols. Apparently it was bought by a local millionaire who has plans to turn it into a luxury hotel although those plans appear to have stalled. I was a bit nervous about this one as we'd seen security the night before and they looked like regular police. The signs on the fence suggested they were 'security police' and their website claims they operate under the control of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia. We very nearly had a run in with one of them patrolling but managed to make a quick getaway thankfully. I really enjoyed it in here. We'd not seen any internal pictures so it was a proper treat to discover what was inside. The theatre was absolutely stunning. Visited with Elliot5200 on what was a great trip to a fascinating country! Thanks for looking.
  9. 9 points
    Not much left , not vandalised and loads of decay and bird poo and dive bomming pigeons, been closed a few years now on with the pics thanks for looking
  10. 9 points
    History Margaret Beaven School is a grade II-listed building that was built in 1885 and was designed by Francis Doyle. The house was originally called Eddesbury, it was supposedly the last sustainable Victorian house that was built in West Derby. It was once occupied by Danson Cunningham a friend of Margaret Beaven who was Liverpool's first woman lord mayor. Since the school shut down 13 years ago, the building has been used for filming purposes. It was reported that in May 2018, there was a large fire that ripped throughout the building, we don't know which parts of the building have been damaged as we have not been back since. Our Visit After driving past this place a few times previous to our visit, we decided to have a look online to see if anyone had visited the site before us and unfortunately we came up empty-handed. After realizing this, we took it upon our selves to go down and try gain access, it took us 3 visits before we finally found an entry point. The access point was hard to get through as it was awkward and a tight squeeze. The front part of the building is boarded up and is alarmed, we did manage to gain access but the alarm was unbearable so we decided to just leave it. Once we left, we hung around to see if someone would show up and they did. Overall, the explore was well worth it even though we didn't stay to get pictures of the main building.
  11. 9 points
    An abandoned beacon in the baltic sea. There are two of it. One 1000m and the other one in 4000m distance from the runway. Ther were used to enlarge the range of the runway ...so the pilots could navigate easier to the short runway. Build and used by the NVA. The army of the former GDR... (DDR).
  12. 8 points
    was lucky enough to spend 3 days in the exclusion zone earlier this year; some shote within the former USSR "secret" Radar Station
  13. 8 points
    Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  14. 8 points
    I know it's been posted to death, but I thought I'd post anyway.. During the Second World War, high explosive and incendiary bombs were stored in the old quarry, which was chosen because it was accessible by road and railway. Also, its remoteness meant there was a reduced risk to the public if there had been an explosion. Slate waste was spread over the bomb store to camouflage it from German planes. It’s estimated that the storage area inside the quarry was equivalent to two football pitches. The bombs were unloaded in the reconfigured railway sidings after being brought by train directly from the munitions factories where they were made. In the old slate sheds on the site, women workers filled ammunition belts with rounds of bullets for machine guns. When an RAF airbase needed ammunition for its planes, an order would be sent through to Glyn Rhonwy and be delivered by road or by rail. After the war, the tens of thousands of tons of armaments that had not been used were moved to a nearby quarry and detonated, resulting in thick black smoke obscuring the mountains. In the 1950s, a lake formed in the hollow left by the earlier quarrying. The water was removed when specialists began, in 1969, the long process of removing the remaining explosives and triggers. Video here: https://youtu.be/Mzociz6skcM
  15. 8 points
    This courthouse is more then 14o years old. It has been empty for some years now and has a lot of treasures to offer. The courthouse is just huge. Many aisles, stairwells, offices and 14 boardrooms. In the entire building is still a lot of equipment available, the heaters are still running and the electricity is not turned off. In the basement, the light is burning in some rooms, files are still lying around and all the electric clocks in the house are still running.
  16. 8 points
    Did not see many reports from this hospital. It was one that was in the process of demolition. One wing was already gone but this gave me an nice access to the basement through the rubble. It felt strange. the heating was still on,power and the clocks were also working.. Some of the x-ray machines were still powered on.Probably part of the building was still in use,as there was an ambulance in the garage.But i heard of rumours that there was an alarm there,so didn't explore this vehicle. Since I was alone this time, my senses were working overtime.At a certain time, I saw a vehicle of security parked outside of the building ,while I was on the top floor.Time to leave.I went back to the entry point,where the basement was in A pile of rubble and heard people going in just above me. Then I left via the back because the car was still parked at the front. A nice explore, at the last day of the year. 1 the kitchen area IMG_0316 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 Hallway with names of the persones who worked there IMG_0323 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 one of the rooms IMG_0327-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 sad looking lamp IMG_0332-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 ready for scanning IMG_0362 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 also ready for use IMG_0369 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 already 15.45 ? IMG_0379 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 more exam's today ? IMG_0371 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 look into the light please IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 to the children's ward IMG_0373 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  17. 8 points
    We went to this really impressed location. The security there is very high and some people said it is impossible to get in. We made it without any problems.
  18. 8 points
    Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd was the largest film production company of Hong Kong. In 1925, three Shaw brothers - Runje, Runme, and Runde - founded Tianyi Film Company (also called Unique) in Shanghai, and established a film distribution base in Singapore, where Runme and the youngest brother, Run Run Shaw, managed the precursor to the parent company, the Shaw Organisation. In 1957, Run Run Shaw moved to Hong Kong, set up a new company called Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Ltd, and built a new studio at Clearwater Bay, which officially opened in 1961 as Movietown. In the mid-1960s, Movietown was the largest and best-equipped studio in Chinese filmmaking as well as the largest privately owned studio in the world, with 15 stages, two permanent sets, state-of-the-art film-making equipment and facilities, and 1,300 employees. The 1960s was a period of intense rivalry between Shaw Brothers and Cathay Organisation, but eventually Shaw Brothers gained the upper hand and Cathay ceased film production in 1970. Some of Shaw Brothers' most notable films were made in this period, including The Magnificent Concubine, The Love Eterne, as well as One-Armed Swordsman, which broke the box office records and spawned multiple sequels. Over the years the film company produced some 1,000 films, some of them being the most popular and significant Chinese-language films of the period. The studio popularised the kung-fu genre of films, which later included Five Fingers of Death and The 36th Chamber of Shaolin. In the 1970s, Shaw Brothers faced a strong challenge from a new studio, Golden Harvest, which had considerable success internationally with the martial arts film 'Enter the Dragon' starring Bruce Lee. Shaw Brothers then also began to co-produce films with western producers for the international market, and invested in films such as Meteor and Blade Runner. However, Shaw Brothers ceased film production in 1986 because of competition from Golden Harvest and increasing piracy, focusing instead on TV production. In 1986, Movietown became TV City, which was leased to TVB for TV production. In 1988, the company was reorganized under the umbrella of Shaw Organisation. In the 1990s, Shaw again started making a few films, but no longer on the same scale as before. In 2011 Shaw Brothers was reorganised into the Clear Water Bay Land Company Limited, its film production business being taken over by other companies within the Shaw conglomerate. Shaw Studios / Movietown has been vacant since 2003. There are plans to eventually turn it into a Grade I historical site but there is no sign of this taking place at the moment. Shaw Studios has since relocated to a new site in Tseung Kwan O, Hong Kong. Hong Kong is extremely hot and humid at this time of year, often with up to 95% humidity, so this was a tiring explore. The mosquitoes and cockroaches absolutely love it though so you're never short of a few friends along the way ..... If you ever come here, definitely pack some bug spray. Now, despite covering a lot of ground in a few hours here, we only managed to see a fraction of what is left. It's absolutely massive. There are a couple of active looking buildings but the majority is completely deserted. I wish we'd gone back to see the rest but too many #gintops (don't ask *smh*) got in the way. Hong Kong's a pretty epic place but I would recommend visiting at another time of year to avoid the humidity. There's a lot to explore so I may return next year. Shaw studios will be the first place I come back to if I do. For a more extensive report check out drhowser's report here > https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/shaw-bros-studios-hong-kong-sept-17.109830/#post-1182300 This building appeared to be set up for functions Studio named after George Clooney randomly Rooms of old film reels and projection equipment just lying around.... This was the guy who made it all happen. He lived until the age of 106!! RIP Sir Shaw 謝謝你的期待
  19. 8 points
    First report here, the well-known Chateau wolfenstein. Lost somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes, the castle was built 1931 by a rich Baron. It has many use throught the years, hospital, command centre during the war, care home for soldiers and, apparently some kind of jail for war and politic prisonners. Now, it 's still a part a the hospital complex but it is unused, except for a room where the hospital stocks some servers.
  20. 8 points
    Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  21. 8 points
    History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  22. 8 points
    One of my favorites from my first Italy trip. For a industry freak like me it can't get any better then this. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  23. 7 points
    Originally opened in 1833 as Connaght District Lunatic Asylum, later changing its name. I found a very interesting write up on the below link, which is where I copied this - It was intended for the care of ‘curable lunatics’ and opened in a spirit of optimism with regard to its progressive role in public health. Its history, however, is one of continual struggle: to prevent the admission of unsuitable cases, to secure additional funding and to offer reasonable standards of care under difficult conditions. In common with the majority of other District Asylums, the CDLA was continually overcrowded, housing in November 1900, for example, 1,165 patients in accommodation designed to hold 840. https://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/tales-from-the-big-house-the-connacht-district-lunatic-asylum-in-the-late-nineteenth-century/ Exactly a year ago I went over to Ireland with pretty much just 2 locations I was desperately keen to visit. After failing to find any access at the first (another asylum) I drove west. It was a lovely bright, autumnal day and eventually I found myself inside. All was fine for 10-15 minutes until I turned round to find myself face-to-face with a gentleman who I guess was a caretaker of sorts. I hadn't heard him make any noise to alert me he was there and so I was in a mild state of shock! He told me that there had been some recent vandalism but after a few minutes of chatting I managed to persuade him not to evict me or alert the authorities. For that I was incredibly grateful. Here is my collection (a bit corridor-heavy)
  24. 7 points
    History Maes Mynan care home was a two floor 33 bedroom care home on a site of 2.6 acres. The care home was for the elderly and it had its own day service and its own respite service for a short stay and emergency placements. The site was bought in 2013 by the healthcare company and has been left untouched since. The building itself we could not find much history about or anything about when the care home opened. Our Visit We decided to visit this place when we went out on a day trip to Engedi chapel (report will be up soon). On the way back we still had a lot of daylight left so we thought we would stop in and have a look at this site after seeing a report. The surrounding area was very overgrown and there was a long pathway leading up to the build. The site itself was in pretty good condition, well worth the visit if you have any free time. Be mindful if you do visit as just at the back of the site, there is a house that we assumed is occupied.
  25. 7 points
    This would be my 2nd fav kirkbride of those that I've seen so far and I was obsessed with seeing it. My first visit however was not the best as it was 8­F when I first got in and maybe warmed up to 19 outside but felt much colder inside. It was too cold really to focus on taking photos, too cold to really take my hands out of my gloves but necessary. I dropped my 24-70 lens on the floor fumbling around with big ass gloves on trying to switch lenses, when I got home in the wee hours of the morning the next day I was just carrying my camera (why it wasn't in the bag I don't know) and I dropped it in the driveway...with the same lens attached :(. I also lost 75 photos or so from that trip and found out later it was due to a faulty card reader when I was transferring them. So with all that I had to go back again and reshoot and one photo in particular I wanted to capture again was the sun streaming through the decorative risers on the stairway and onto the wall. Well neither of the times I went back was the sun out so I never was able to get that photo again. Last visit at least I had the newer camera as I sold the 7D a month prior AND it wasn't so freakn cold.
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