Jump to content

Our Picks

Top content from across the community, hand-picked by us.

Spring Mills, Huddersfield - July 2018
The history 

A two-storey mill built in 1831 which resides two miles west of the town centre of Huddersfield. The Financial Reporting Council (FCR) of 1834 shows Armitage Bros already established here. The family name 'Armitage' pre-dates the 14th century, but it was Joseph Armitage (1778-1860) who significantly increased the family fortune and moved decisively into the gentry class. In 1822 he built the first woollen manufacturing mill at Milnsbridge, by the 1840's he handed over control of the business to his sons, who reconstituted it as a partnership called Armitage Bros, which survived until it became a limited company. By 1914 it was part of John Crowther's group. In the late 19th century John Crowther and his two sons moved from Marsden down the Clone Valley to Milnsbridge after purchasing two mills, where they began the successful production of woollen cloth. Crowther took his own life in 1931 and its thought that the death of his wife and the great depression were cumulative in this. Today parts of the mill are rented to a few small business, elsewhere derelict.
  • 8 replies

The secrets of the legendary catacombs of Paris, a tunnel system that spans more than 280km in length.
The secrets of the legendary catacombs of Paris, a tunnel system that spans more than 280km in length.
 
The catacombs in Paris hold remains of more than six million people. They are part of a tunnel network that runs below Paris that is more than 280 kilometers long. No one knows how far the tunnels extend in total, as there are still many paths that are unmapped and even undiscovered. The main reason behind the tunnels was to extract  Lutetian limestone for use as a building material. For instance, parts of the Louvre, the Place de la Concorde and Les Invalides were built with limestone from this tunnel system.
 
  • 5 replies

Red Cross Hospital - June 2018
Red Cross Hospital
 
 
History
 
Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients.
 
  • 11 replies

Future Factory
History
This factory was opened in 1900 and made cardboard out of straw, in that time this product was very popular so 8 years later the made another factory next to the other one.
In 1968 the factory closed due to competition from abroad, after the factory was closed it was sold off to a men who repaired and sold off machines.
  • 7 replies

Town Mansion (Permission Visit) - May 2018
Town Mansion 
 
 
History
 
The Town Mansion was originally built in 1912 by a wealthy petroleum importer. During the early 20th century, the area in which the mansion was built, had become a hub for many rich German families in the early 1900's. By 1918, once the First World War had come to an end and the town was heavily damaged by the intense bombing raids at the start of the war and then German occupation of Belgium in 1914. Only two houses in that street survived, the Town Mansion being one of those. It was then later occupied by a Belgium shipbuilder until the late 1960's, when it was used as an office space. The mansion was abandoned in 1991 and hasn't been formally resided in since.
  • 15 replies

Manor Dior. Nov 2016
Named Manor Dior due to the vast collection of vintage Dior tights in the upstairs main bedroom.
The Dior bedroom was probably the room where the old lady spent her final days in the house, bed ridden judging by the medical items in there and district nurses documents. It appears she outlived her husband by some years and lived there alone. Not sure how long the house has been abandoned for but the decay would suggest some years.
  • 14 replies

Chateau Marianne - April 2018
Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste
 
 
History
 
Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname  'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers.  It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. 
  • 19 replies

Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, France - 2017
The Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, renamed Group Fortification Yser after 1919, is a military installation near Metz that was constructed between 1907 and 1914. It is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and formed part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. 

During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz.
  • 7 replies

Kinmel Hall, Wales - May 2018
The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests.  The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands.
The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings.
  • 8 replies

Bureau Central - France - May 2018
The once grand Bureau Central administration building now stands decayed and rotting, but still retains nearly all of it's character.
 

History
 
The Bureau Central was the main offices for the de Wendel Family Metal company. The Family had been involved in metal industry since the 18th Century. By the 19th Century they were the 3rd largest iron company in Franc. In 1870 they became the largest iron company after a major furnace upgrade successfully modernised their production.
 
During this period they employed 7000 people and were producing 112,500 tonnes of iron and 134,500 tonnes of pig iron each year.
When they expanding to steelmaking, they needed a grand main office to impress customers and keep on top of their every growing enterprise, and so in 1892 Central Bureau was built. In 1926 the Bureau Central was expanded to cope with the still growing paperwork.
 
The de Wendal iron enteprise continued to flourish until the post WW2 period where business fell into a decline. The mining industry was nationalised and eventually the whole family company was completely nationalised.
 
Bureau Central was abandoned in the 1980's after a company merger. The building itself is listed and protected.
 
  • 2 replies

Lycée V. - visited 05/2018
The well known Lycée V. has been a grammar school for girls only. It#s been closed in the 1990's and abandoned since.
 
  • 3 replies

Creaky Floors Asylum 2016
It's a very old campus which was started in 1828 for the rich mentally ill and other buildings were built as time progressed. For a time they practiced eugenics here which then became outlawed.  The  asylum closed in the 70's  and was vacant till years later when a few of of the buildings were used as a medium- security prison.  It was then sold to a developer who has converted  several of the buildings to apartments and continues to do so.  This place is most known for it's lovely spiral staircase in the admin building. It seems most come here , shoot that and leave.....but there's so much more here that is photo worthy in that building as well as the others. It's impossible to walk quietly in here as the old wooden floors creak with every step...it was really annoying trying to be stealthy. Also a lot of the floors and walls are leaning so badly that at times it felt like you were in a fun house with the odd angles. However having said that everything is in excellent condition here with only a few minor areas with some water/weather damage. Side note the patient cemetery is also located on the grounds which is in this set.
 
 
  • 17 replies

Mühle des Fotografen - visited 04/2018
Two weeks ago I decided to visit a small mill that I had on my list for a long time. At Google Maps I saw two buildings that turned out to be the mill and the miller's residential building. I did'nt expect too much but was very happy in the end. Although the mill is abandoned for many years it is in a very good condition - not graffiti, very little vandalism. The miller seems to have been very passionate for two things: beer and photography. Good guy! 
 
  • 4 replies

Campina Youth House - February 2018
History

The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to  showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. 
 
  • 25 replies

Old Royal High School / New Parliament House, Edinburgh - Feb 2018
History
 
The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens.
 
  • 10 replies

Antebellum State Hospital
This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college  that did some research and gave presentation a few  years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection.  The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition.  Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building.  There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. 
 
  • 16 replies

Dog Walker State Hospital - U.S.
I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside.
 
  • 25 replies

BeLux-Industry-Tour, September 2017
Hey everyone!
 
It's been a while since our small Belgium/Luxembuorg/France-Roadtrip in September, but now I finally had the time to recall this one and edit some of the images.
As I'm totally new to photography, I would be very delighted to hear your opinion on the photos and processing! (:
 

1st day:Usine Barbele


2nd day: HFB



3rd day: Diesel Power Plant

 
4th day: Salle des Compresseurs
 
 
5th day: Power Plant X

 
best wishes from Germany,
Nico
  • 11 replies

Haus der Offiezere - Germany, September 2016 & March 2017
Haus der Offiezere
 
My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history!

History

The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp.

After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers.

Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants.

This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since.

 
 
 
 
  • 20 replies

Victoria BS - January 2018
Hi, this is my first report, I don't really know what to write but here goes.......
 
Unless you have been on Mars or in a coma for the past couple of weeks you would most probably have heard about this Manor House. Some pictures were posted & the guys who posted them had pretty much made it crystal that they were not going to be sharing its location. The post stated that they hoped that people would forget about it & that it would be saved. Or to put it another way - they threw the gauntlet down big time and by doing that it had made it the UK’s most hunted derp within the UE community, and surprise surprise within a day it had been found by more than one person. The actual post & chats that I had with them gave me a couple of very good clues & to be fair to the guys when I told them that I had it they did clue me up with everything I needed to know.  
Anyway, It just so happened that I was in the area with some free time on the Wednesday so I popped along. I got there before sun up & had the house to myself for a couple of hours, it was a pretty much ad hoc visit & quickly realised that I needed a wider lens, I knew some guys were planning to hit it on the Saturday & decided a revisit was in order. 
Messages were sent & arrangements were made for the pre-Sun up meet, I’d gotten wind that there may be a few people there so I was not surprised to see a few other faces when I opened the door at around 7am. The pre-dawn light, or rather lack of it meant that we all sat around having a chat & a schmoke as more & more people turned up out of the darkness. I didn’t count but I’m told that at 08:30 there were 21 of us in the house and that the snack bar had ran out of breakfast rolls & that pin badges & t shirt sales were through the roof. 
  • 9 replies

Abandoned soviet space shuttles
Baikonur cosmodrome.
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
  • 12 replies

Mad Scientist's Lab, Poland (May 2015)
This place was part of a giant complex where they used to build trains for the national railroad company.
Most of the site was already demolished by the time we got here, but the lab itself was still worth the visit.
 
It's been abandoned since 2010, which is sort of surprising, if you look at the amount of decay, but well, I'm not complaining about that at all...
 
Actually took 2 visits to get in. First attempt was on a thursday afternoon. Entered the site, walked to the particular building and said to my girl: "what's that noise?!"
Peeked inside the building and got instantly spotted by demolition workers... Took a run and returned a few days later in the weekend.
More luck that time.
 
Have to say, definitely worth it...

 
 
Thanks for looking!!
  • 21 replies

Leopold Fortress, France - October 2017
Leopold Fortress, France - October 2017
This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz
http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/topic/12165-leopold-fortress-france-october-2017/
#oblivionstate #urbanexploration
  • 11 replies

Manicomio di C. - 09/2016
The terrain of this psychiatric hospital is huge (1.000.000 square metre). So it took me 2 days to explore and I didn't have a chance to visit all buildings or the whole surrounding. UNfortunately most of the buildings were cleared but it was still beautiful there.
Between 1908 and 1933  40 buildings evolved so the hospital had a capacity of 2.000 patients. Situated on a small hill above the sea the hospital is abandoned since 1998.


 
Behind the scene - my way of exploring
 
  • 8 replies

Prison (U.S)
Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy....
 
  • 12 replies

×