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Punk

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Punk last won the day on June 5

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About Punk

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  • Birthday 01/18/1986

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    Leicester

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  1. Wow, I didn't realise financial irregularities happened in German football. Always a shame when stuff like that happens, not fair for the loyal fans. Nice little explore though. Nice to see a stadium pop up
  2. Looks an interesting place. Nice set of snaps
  3. Nice set there, Dover seems to be a bit of a Aladins cave for underground stuff
  4. I don't think they are. No mention of a connection online or anything. Ive not done the caves, yet
  5. The short version is they looked at all my kit and asked what I knew about UE, I played dumb. I'll tell you the full version next time I see you
  6. Personally I'm not big on topsides, but this was worth the hassle to get in. I'd recommend it if you're that way
  7. History Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts. Explore This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States. Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia. Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River. (1) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) ( (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) Cheers for Looking
  8. History Butternut is a foulwater storage tank in the suburb of Saint Henri. It was built in the 1980's with the increasing population of the local area. Essentially this is two long box sections, divided by pillars every 7 feet and split into 3 sections by 2 trenches for the soup to flow back into the sewerage system. Explore By this point in the week, our numbers were dwindling. Still a fun evening which was finished with mimosas on a friends balcony, before sleeping on said balcony. Although being entirely made of concrete, this was very photogenic. There was plenty of evidence of it's purpose on the floor, but the worms didn't seem to mind. There were hundreds of them. Great end to an epic week. (1) (2) (3) (4) Cheers for Looking
  9. History The Canada Malting complex was designed by David Jerome Spence, and was built in 1904. On the west side of the complex there are nine violet coloured silos. They are covered in treated clay tiles that were manufactured by the Barnett and Record Co. of Minneapolis. These silos are rare examples of using this technique to cover and insulate silos. The cement silos on the other side were added in the 1940s, and were used to store the barley used to produce the malt. The barley was germinated and dried in the buildings that lined Saint-Ambroise Street. The factory had an enormous output of 250,000 pounds (110,000 kg) of malt per year, and distributed it to distilleries and breweries. The closing of the Lachine Canal in 1970 forced the company to transport its malt by train only, and around 1980, the building was actually too small and the transportation costs too high, so the company abandoned the site and moved into a new malting complex located at 205 Riverside and Mill Street, Montreal. The building was then sold for $500,000 and became a soya and corn storage facility for Quonta Holding Ltd, before it was abandoned in 1989 when Canadian National ceased its rail line service to factories in this area of the canal. The original clay silos are now protected as part of the Lachine Canal National Historic Site. They have been so battered from both the elements and vandalism, that it is no longer possible to restore them. There have been applications for it to be converted to accommodation, but all plans have been refused so far. Since being abandoned in 1989, the factory has been covered in graffiti on the outside as well as the inside of the building. Construction of the original silos in 1903 Explore After a little trouble getting through customs, I was here 3 hours after first stepping foot on Canadian soil. I spent my first two nights sleeping here, one helping set up, another partying. Sadly my experience with customs was more costly than I initially thought. After guiding me to a search room, they tipped the contents of my rucksack out and my lens got damaged. £150 for the repair, and they had loads of questions regarding the contents of my luggage. *Note to self, don't take waders next time*. After an hour and a half, I was on the bus to my friend's apartment. This place is massive. When we returned a few days later, the 4 of us spent around 4 hours in here and only covered about 3 quarters of it. Sadly, I can see this lasting just a couple of years more before it gets knocked down, or it goes down of it's own accord. While on the rooftop we looked at the façade of the main building, and the wall is coming away at the corners. The local explorers have done an admirable job making this their own. They've cleared areas for social events, clear walkways for people to get around safely and have added features, like a wood burner and a bar. Considering I usually prefer underground stuff, I really enjoyed this place. The rooftop is among the best I've seen, it looks over downtown Montreal and Mont Royal. This is somewhere I would return to. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) Cheers for Looking
  10. History It's been pretty hard to find history on this one, especially with all the information being in French Canadian. Located in the Villeray-Saint-Michael-Parc area of Montreal, Saint Bernadine de Sienne was a Catholic church built between 1955 and 1956. As well as providing religious services and confession, the church served as a hub for the local community. It provided room for nurseries, sunday school, youth activities among other community services. With the local community changing, less people regularly attending church and the rising cost of maintenance, Saint Bernadine de Sienne closed it's doors for the last time in April 2017. Explore This was one explore in a week of shenanigans. With 3 Brits, 2 Canadians, an Aussie and a Slovenian, this was very much an international affair. Access was laughable. While in there, photos happened, then we spent a couple of hours pissing around. This is probably the most relaxed I've ever felt in a derp. This is a beautiful building, it'll be a shame if it fell into disrepair or got torn down. I'm not a big fan of religion, but religious structures like churches, temples and mosques can be stunningly beautiful. For a twentieth century church, this was mesmerising and very photogenic. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  11. About 3 months after he fractured his spine, I went down to Nailsworth to visit my friend Oort. After a quick coffee and a catch up, we headed straight to the mine for Oort's first mooch after his accident. Not much online. The early history of these quarries is vague. Presumably quarrying of the fine oolite stone has been carried on at the outcrop since Roman times. Due to the steep hillsides, the overburden soon became too great and thus they went underground. There are a number of small scale developments. According to a 90 year old inhabitant of Nailsworth, a Mr William Mortimer who died in 1970, such places were worked in the winter months by cottagers employed in casual agricultural work during the summer. Graffitti dating 1900-1947 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Cheers for Looking
  12. Cracking set of snaps there. Good stuff, enjoyed this
  13. History Holwell is a small hamlet in the Parish of Ab Kettleby, near Melton Mowbray. The Parish of Ab Kettleby has long been known for it’s Iron Ore reserves in Ab Kettleby, Holwell and Wartnaby, Holwell being the main location. There were also Quarries at Eaton, Scalford and Wycombe, close to the Vale of Belvoir. Holwell was the most important centre. Iron ore was first quarried to the north of Holwell on the south side of the narrow part of Landyke Lane in 1875 and continued in various places to the north and east of the hamlet until 1930. From 1931 until 1943 iron ore was mined rather than quarried east of Brown's Hill. The mine was a drift mine and the tunnel emerged from the north side of the hill in 1943. Holwell Quarry in the late 19th century. Quarrying was resumed at that point and continued until 1962. The last quarrying took place close to the road to Scalford Hall. Quarrying was done by hand with the help of explosives at first. The first quarrying machine was a petrol parrafin digger introduced in 1930. The first diesel digger arrived in 1943. The ore was at first taken away by horse and cart, but the Holwell Iron Company built a standard gauge mineral railway in 1877 which connected with the Midland Railway's Syston to Peterborough line west of Melton Mowbray. Most of this mineral railway was taken over and improved by the Midland in two stages: first as part of their Nottingham to Melton line and then as their Holwell branch (connecting with that line) in 1887.This was extended the same year northwards to Wycomb Junction on the Great Northern's Waltham branch. This branch transported the ore from Holwell as well as some of that from Eaton. A large section of this line is now the Old Dalby Test Track, running from Melton Mowbray to Nottingham, with the main engine shed being located at Asfordby Valley, this area is known locally as Holwell Works. London Underground’s stock at Widmerpool station on the Old Dalby test track The Holwell company built their own iron works close to the Holwell Branch which operated from 1881. The works was called Holwell Works because it was built by the Holwell Company but was actually at Asfordby Hill. The quarries and the mine fed the standard gauge line by means of narrow gauge tramways. These were at first worked by gravity or horses, but diesel locomotives were introduced in 1933. The tramways were replaced by lorries in 1948. The quarry lasted through the 1950’s, but eventually closed in 1962. The mine was only open from 1931 to 1943. The area now, managed by the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust Part of the quarry area has been smoothed over. Part has been left and retained as a nature reserve. There are warning of the single track road leading to the quarry, not to drive too far onto the verge due to the risk of collapse. Explore This was an impromptu explore, following explore somewhere that was disapointing and boring. I have been reading up and checking this place for a couple of years or so with a couple of others, but with no results. After meeting a couple of mine explorers, we got chatting about Holwell, so on this night with a couple of others, we decided to give it a go. On previous looks and nosies, I knew that the place was a trifle unstable. On one survey visit with UrbanCaving, we found that one of the entrances was completely blocked by a cave-in. Proving the iron gate at the opening a little futile. Once in, I walked off ahead with Rat. We soon found multiple cave-ins and questionable techniques to avoid further cave-ins. Only my second mine to date, but I’m sure I’ll be doing a few more in the future. (1) This is on of the cave-ins we discovered inside the mine. Much of the roof is held up by wooden and iron supports. This shows that it's not entirely foolproof. (2) (3) (4) Dodgey looking roof support made from wood. Not entirely convinced this would made today's Health & Safety standards for a safe working environment. (5) (6) (7) Cheers for Looking
  14. History Ladybower was built between 1935 and 1943 by the Derwent Valley Water Board to supplement the other two reservoirs in supplying the water needs of the East Midlands. It took a further two years to fill (1945). The dam differs from the Howden Reservoir and Derwent Reservoir in that it is a clay-cored earth embankment, and not a solid masonry dam. Below the dam is a cut-off trench 180 feet (55 m) deep and 6 feet (1.8 m) wide filled with concrete, stretching 500 feet (150 m) into the hills each side, to stop water leaking round the dam. The dam wall was built by Richard Baillie and Sons, a Scottish company. The two viaducts, Ashopton and Ladybower, needed to carry the trunk roads over the reservoir were built by the London firm of Holloways, using a steel frame clad in concrete. The project was delayed when the Second World War broke out in 1939, making labour and raw materials scarce. But construction was continued due to the strategic importance of maintaining supplies. King George VI, accompanied by Queen Elizabeth, formally opened the reservoir on 25 September 1945. During the 1990s the wall was raised and strengthened to reduce the risk of over-topping in a major flood. The original dam wall contains 100,000 tons of concrete, over one million tons of earth and 100,000 tons of clay for the core. The upstream face is stone faced. Materials were brought to the site on the Derwent Valley Water Board's own branch line and their sidings off the main line in theHope Valley. The dam's design is unusual in having two totally enclosed bellmouth overflows (locally named the "plugholes") at the side of the wall. These are stone and of 80 feet (24 m) diameter with outlets of 15 feet (4.6 m) diameter. Each discharges via its own valve house at the base of the dam. The overflows originally had walkways around them but they were dismantled many years ago. The bell mouths are often completely out of the water and are only rarely submerged, often after heavy rainfall or flooding. Explore On our way from Manchester, back to Leicester, I decided to take the car I was in, over Snake Pass. We were an hour ahead of UrbanCaving's car and I didn't have a key to his house, so there was no rush back to middle England. Beautiful road and after a couple of stops for photos, we were coming towards Ladybower Reservoir. So I posed the question, "As we're here, why not?" I've wanted to do this beauty for years, each time I've been in the area, the bellmouths have been flowing well. After weeks of little to no rain, we had our chance to strike. The general opinion was "Fuck it, why not?" So we pulled into the car park, got the camera kit on and headed on our way. Once in, I was gobsmacked with the size. And the echo. Awesome sneaky explore which put us behind schedule by an hour (sorry UrbanCaving). Really enjoyed this one, certainly worth the lateness. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  15. As if by chance, a group of us were in Manchester at the same time. All agreeing to meet with the Manchester lot on our 2nd day there. After a facebook discussion that seemed to go on forever, made harder to understand while intoxicated, we finally agreed to meet in Inhospitable on the 2nd day. Getting 9 people into a drain was surprisingly quick and easy We met the Manchester lot in there when they arrived, then headed to Processor after a mooch. Inhospitable Inhospitable is 700 yard long culvert which carries the Moss Brook beneath Collyhurst. It's infall is a 15ft brick arch Along the way it changes to a 10ft brick arch which continues towards the outfall. This consists of a 7ft brick pipe built 8ft up in a retaining wall. Halfway through the culvert there is an overflow chamber with a manual operated penstock, when the flow gets too strong the penstock drops blocking the culvert this causes the brook too divert along the works. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) The Works The Works is a 700 yard overflow which acts as overflow for Inhospitable. It consists of a 10ft red and black brick pipe. This flows through the overflow chamber by dropping down 2 sets of steps, the latter been quite steep. The bottom of said stairs are at least 70ft below the surface. Both the moss brook and the Works discharge too the Irk. (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) (16) I loved this drain. It was a great start to an awesome week that followed. Thank you Ojay, paulpowers, Nickindroy, Snake Oil, The Raw, Maniac, extreme_ironing and everyone else who helped myself and UrbanCaving with the draining tour for international drainers. It's been wild, exhausting and an absolute blast. Maybe again next year Cheers for Looking
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