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Albino-jay

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Albino-jay last won the day on March 13

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About Albino-jay

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    Stockport

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  1. I’d had my eye on this place for years. I’m from Prestwich so only up the road and I remember going past the Rialto further up where there is now a maccies and past this place on our way into town as a kid. I lived in Broughton briefly about 5 years ago and used to keep an eye on it, however it was always well sealed. Visited with @EOA initially and @Host and @CameraShy joined us later. History Built in 1899 by the Broughton Theatres Syndicate Ltd, Victoria Theatre opened in December 1900. Less than a year after opening it was used as a cinema (although sadly there is no signs of cinema use left) Seating was extended from 2,000 upto 3,000 in 1910 and between 1919 and 1919 it was used as a theatre again. It was then used as a cinema again until it closed in 1958 when it was then used as a clothing/furniture store until 1973 when it was an unsuccessful bingo hall, which closed shortly after. It remained closed until the 80s when it opened up as Bingo hall, which it remained until its closure in 2008 under the Palace name. Its Grade II listed and on the theatres at risk register. More info can be found here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Theatre,_Salford http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/SalfordTheatres.htm#victoria https://salfordvictoria.co.uk/ Pics Ill start with some old pictures of the theatre taken from google image search or the above websites. and now not too sure on the date of this Now, looking out from the stage Looking down at the stage bad lens flare The upper circle seating area which has been boarded off seating on the dress circle looking down from the dress circle spiderwebs and pigeon shit fill the upper levels. Looking up from the dress circle level to the awesome ceiling. the stalls/stage level more spider webby goodness above one of the boxes next to the stage the back of the curved plaster ceiling above the stage stripped seating in a back room the upper circle boarded off The stage level cheap Down into the basement and underneath eh stage underneath the stage. The wooden levers you can see operated various trapdoors and other stage type thingamabobs. Which is pretty cool. small workshop area Nice tilling Main entrance bingo at its best!
  2. Thats bloody cool. Reminds me of a Zzapp ice cream from the 90s!
  3. Not a massive fan of houses, but when it’s old and pretty untouched. Thats a different matter. Yes yes yes. Nicely photographed.
  4. Love a bit of Brutalism. Them red couch seats look reyt comfy! Mint pics of the place
  5. Thats different. Nice work. Really liking that.
  6. History Tullis Russell was formed in 1809 by Robert Tullis, he acquired Rothes mill in 1836. In 1912 the construction of Markinch Power Station began, to provide the mill with electrical power, rather than power provided from water wheel. The Coal Fired Power Station was completed in 1914, and was fitted with 3 Parsons Units and Rerolle electrical equipment. At some point, I have no definite date, but the power station was extended to take a fourth slightly larger, more modern Parsons unit along with an English Electric system to distribute the power it generated. It was also given an oil fired system to work alongside the coal fired boilers. Sadly, the plant was deemed too dirty after breeching EU emission regulations and was forced to close been replaced by the new biomass plant on site. For a mothballed site though, it's still very much live, all the power is still on and the readouts in the control room as still showing live stats for the power station. It wouldn't take much to raise steam and get her running again! Explore One that i've been meaning to do for a couple of years having seen some seriously epic report on the place it sadly never happened with it being so far away. Big mistake by myself as always, as you will see. Visited with @GK_WAX it was a good day out and good to finally see it. Didn't manage to get any more photo's as we planned to get the boiler house and other bits done on the way out but got collared by a worker in there stripping the turbines We hid behind a switchboard for about 40 minutes with no where to go. The only possible way out was where he came from or back through the small window he was boarding back up. Luckily he was a sound guy and we had a natter about the place before he escorted us out. The metal fairies had been in before Christmas and it seems this has kicked the demo team up the arse to press on. It won't have long left, access was a bit of a faff due to the amount of chomping and concrete rubble blocking everything. Pics A sorry sight to behold indeed
  7. History The Art Deco cinema was designed for the Union Cinema Circuit by renowned architects Verity and Beverley. It opened on 23rd July 1937 but was shortly taken over by ABC (Associated British Cinemas) in October that year. It became a Ritz in the 60’s and was used as a cinema up until it’s closure on 18th June 1984 when it was taken over as a bingo hall until that then closed in 2008. Grade II listed due to it’s highly decorative interior of an Art Deco, Neo-Egyptian and Chinoiserie inspired decoration. Which of very few survive now. Here’s a pretty cool video I’ve linked from Youtube with some cracking old images of the place along with a recording of the Compton Organ being played there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Ej2LEqDEQ Our Visit I’d seen @AndyK and @Spidermonkey had been here a few weeks back, followed by @dweebs report also, so with the 28 meet being in Brum it was the perfect opportunity to get over and have a look. Pretty straight forward as it seems it had quite a bit of traffic earlier in the week to which I noticed the lights were on. Which is ideal as it’s a pain in the arse light painting these massive auditoriums. Visited with @ferret, @drew howe and @slayaaa. Not too much left from it’s cinema days but still a good un non the less. Pics I’ve included a couple of old photos dragged up from Google and a couple of screengrabs of the above mentioned video for comparison. Starting with some externals Foyer Moving onto the auditorium Some old graffiti behind the stage/screen area A lot of money for it’s day this, and still now to be fair. I certainly wouldn’t mind winning that. Original seating, covered in cobwebs. and to finish on “The shot”
  8. History "Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with a demolition order which was denied but as recently been re-submitted with agreed amendments." Visited with @EOA and @Ferret bumped into @little_ boy_explores on the way out too. Quite a relaxed one, heard stories of dogs but nothing to be seen. The alarm wasn't on when we went but it was when I popped back. Pot luck with this one I think. It has a bit of everything though so although it's been hammered it's deffo worth a look in. Pics
  9. Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
  10. Yeah it's one that i would re visit if i was ever up that way with a spare half hour or so. It's different and pretty interesting. Easy enough that you can leave the mrs in the car too lol
  11. haha its the truth! aww shite, its because i had the 12" version of Bronski Beat, Smalltown boy as the music hahaha bullshit copyright. I guess I will have to re do it with some royalty free crap.
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