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Albino-jay

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Everything posted by Albino-jay

  1. History Agecroft was a coal fired power station which was directly fed by Agecroft Colliery located across the road. The power station consisted of 3 stations. A was opened in 1925 and had 4 Metropolitan Vickers generators putting out 57,500Kw. A video of the opening in 1925 https://www.youtube.com/embed/U6DeR6gj3Nc In 60’s the station was extended, and stations B and C were added along with another 4 generators and 4 natural draft cooling towers. Upping the stations output by 358MW these both opened in 1962. Video from 1962. https://www.youtube.com/embed/hFBSyudgfgM Phone shot of a CEGB sign we found the remains of in A matching that in the video above. Being constructed in 1924 Aerial shot of A in full swing Looking at the station from Agecroft bridge Metrovick Turbo Alternator in Agecroft A Agecroft B and C, dates unknown Agecroft B turbine hall in 1962 The updated control room for B and C in 1962 During use the station had 3 steam loco’s built in 1948 by Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns in Newcastle to shunt coal from the colliery between the stations. With the nationalisation of the UK electric industry a conveyor belt was built instead making the loco’s all but redundant. The loco’s were sold in the 80’s and Agecroft No1 can be seen at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. In 1991 Agecroft Colliery closed in March and 18 months later it was announced the power station would close in March 1993. The demolition of the cooling towers was delayed until May 1994 due to a pair of Peregrine Falcons nesting in them. The cooling towers being demo’d in 94. This is the view and a memory I had as a kid watching the demolition from the opposite bank of the Irwell in Prestwich Clough. I think the disappearance of these from the skyline I grew up seeing is probably why I get a proper woody for cooling towers. Anyway here’s a video of them being demolished. (skip to 1:05) https://www.youtube.com/embed/mS6OxiFIyeE https://www.youtube.com/embed/iL3Nns3MIeM The site was bulldozed and HMP Forest Bank was built on the site, which opened in January 2000. The Explore Now as I mentioned above I grew up a mile or two away from Agecroft and I remember going on bike rides with my old man down the clough along the banks of the Irwell seeing the cooling towers, and sadly watching them be demolished (which at the time was bloody epic) obviously now they’re quite a rare sight, especially round here. So yeah I’m rambling. Anyway basically I’ve always driven past the old site and never really given too much thought to it as there only seems to be a couple of buildings left at the front which as far as I can remember have always been offices. Well driving past a few weeks back I saw a couple of the usual security signs up and thought eh up. That has to be worth a nosey. Worth a nosey it was. With a day free I gave @bolts and @ferret a call and off we went. Now we didn’t know what to expect, maybe there was epic, maybe there was stripped out modernised offices, but you don’t know until you look. Turns out the buildings up front which were ITab are now a school. Rammed with kids of all ages playing out near where we wanted to go, but we persevered and cracked on with the task at hand. We managed to get down between a couple of buildings, and noticed some large cable runs. Similar to that of what’s left at Winnington. A few risks later and a massive shout out to @bolts for having some balls and to push us we were in the main building. After checking this out we moved onto the adjoining outbuilding where we stumbled across the control room. WIN. We checked also out a few outbuildings what I think was a pumphouse at one point which is now just empty, another small outbuilding going underground but that's flooded, and then the offices at the front which I believe were used as the CEGB training school in the 60's is now being used as a Jewish school. Where the old turbine hall for A was there is a 60's ish brick office block which was modernised inside and empty. Still a bloody top find and a great day out. Pics My photo’s are a mix of phone and DSLR So this is the first building we got into. 1st floor (phone) Main building Onto the control room. Peace out
  2. Keep meaning to have a quick nosey in here when I'm passing. Only round the corner from my old gaff. Nice one mate. I miss Nuts lol
  3. Yeah, my Nan and Grandads house had their bathroom the same colour when I was a kid. Mad how I thought it was hideous then but now I'm really into these disgusting 70s bathroom colour schemes. I need help.
  4. Swan Meadow Mill was built by James Eckersley in 1827 and became Old Mill when a new, larger mill was built in 1838. It was demolished in 1960 followed in 1963 by the larger mill. James Eckersley and Sons had three four-storey mills by 1880.Musgraves of Bolton supplied a tandem compound steam engine in 1884.Eckersleys ran six spinning mills and two weaving sheds in the town, Swan Meadow Old, Swan Meadow large, Water Heyes, and Western Mills No.1, No.2 and No.3. The mills housed a total of 236,572 ring spindles, 14,554 mule spindles and 1687 loom. It's a massive complex and there just seems to be mills everywhere here. Deffo loads more to see and more look disused. We just ran out of time to check the rest out. Visited with @Ferret The damp derpier mills most recent use looks to have been a motorbike\scooter garage. The larger mill was used as a multi level go kart track and then more recently airsoft and paintball. Not a bad mill to be fair. Had a good laugh messing about on a kids go kart. The engine house is a B E A UT.
  5. History Beehive cotton spinning mills, comprising 2 spinning blocks with some ancillary buildings. The first mill (spinning mill No.1) was built in 1895, the second (spinning mill No.2) added in 1902. 2 spinning blocks with original offices and gate lodge, and later (c1920) office. Spinning mill No.1 is 5 storeys, with multi-ridge roof and cast-iron, steel and concrete internal structure. Brick externally. Large rectangular windows have central dividing mullions. Yellow brick bands as lintels. Stair/sprinkler tower at south-east angle raised an additional storey with high parapet. Stepped pyramidal cap now missing. Mill No.2 is similar in style, 6 storeys. Stair/sprinkler tower similar in style to that of mill No.1 at south-east angle, and additional smaller tower at north-west angle. Spinning mills are linked by loading bay, with mill name and date (1902). Engine house projects from the rear of mill No.1, and there is also a boiler house and truncated stack to rear. Several bays of single-storey, saw-tooth roofed building at front of mill No.2 - preparation or carding areas. INTERIOR: not inspected. HISTORY: documentary evidence suggests mill No.2 also formerly had engine house to centre-rear, and that there were card-room extensions to the rear of mill No.1. Explore Visited with @Ferret and @Drew howe good end to a good day having finally done St Joes earlier in the day. Just a good chilled mooch around a mahoosive set of mills, rooftop chills, winding scallies up, nearly falling into water tanks.
  6. Yeah I've linked the full image rather than a medium thumbnail. I just thought they'd take forever to load but it seems to be ok.
  7. History The Art Deco cinema was designed for the Union Cinema Circuit by renowned architects Verity and Beverley. It opened on 23rd July 1937 but was shortly taken over by ABC (Associated British Cinemas) in October that year. It became a Ritz in the 60’s and was used as a cinema up until it’s closure on 18th June 1984 when it was taken over as a bingo hall until that then closed in 2008. Grade II listed due to it’s highly decorative interior of an Art Deco, Neo-Egyptian and Chinoiserie inspired decoration. Which of very few survive now. Here’s a pretty cool video I’ve linked from Youtube with some cracking old images of the place along with a recording of the Compton Organ being played there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Ej2LEqDEQ Our Visit I’d seen @AndyK and @Spidermonkey had been here a few weeks back, followed by @dweebs report also, so with the 28 meet being in Brum it was the perfect opportunity to get over and have a look. Pretty straight forward as it seems it had quite a bit of traffic earlier in the week to which I noticed the lights were on. Which is ideal as it’s a pain in the arse light painting these massive auditoriums. Visited with @ferret, @drew howe and @slayaaa. Not too much left from it’s cinema days but still a good un non the less. Pics I’ve included a couple of old photos dragged up from Google and a couple of screengrabs of the above mentioned video for comparison. Starting with some externals Foyer Moving onto the auditorium Some old graffiti behind the stage/screen area A lot of money for it’s day this, and still now to be fair. I certainly wouldn’t mind winning that. Original seating, covered in cobwebs. and to finish on “The shot”
  8. Built circa 1880 for T & J Leigh Cotton & Wool spinning, it had 120,000 spindles in 1914. Twin six storey brick built with an ornamental engine house between. Fireproof construction and cast iron pillars between windows on the top floor. It was Grade II listed in 1975. The building has had it’s various uses over the past few decades. A large section was a furniture shop. A bed and Sofa shop. A gym, joinery workshop. Until recently where it is now currently being stripped to be converted to apartments. Been in here a few times now, when it was open for summer roof chills, and more recently now it’s stripped. I’ll keep checking on it as it’s local and I really want to see the engine house but it seems to be quite secure. Anyway it’s still a grand old mill so here’s a few pictures.
  9. Here's a pic of the control room around it's opening time in the 20's if anyone is interested. Forgot to include it in my report. DOH
  10. I’d had my eye on this place for years. I’m from Prestwich so only up the road and I remember going past the Rialto further up where there is now a maccies and past this place on our way into town as a kid. I lived in Broughton briefly about 5 years ago and used to keep an eye on it, however it was always well sealed. Visited with @EOA initially and @Host and @CameraShy joined us later. History Built in 1899 by the Broughton Theatres Syndicate Ltd, Victoria Theatre opened in December 1900. Less than a year after opening it was used as a cinema (although sadly there is no signs of cinema use left) Seating was extended from 2,000 upto 3,000 in 1910 and between 1919 and 1919 it was used as a theatre again. It was then used as a cinema again until it closed in 1958 when it was then used as a clothing/furniture store until 1973 when it was an unsuccessful bingo hall, which closed shortly after. It remained closed until the 80s when it opened up as Bingo hall, which it remained until its closure in 2008 under the Palace name. Its Grade II listed and on the theatres at risk register. More info can be found here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Theatre,_Salford http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/SalfordTheatres.htm#victoria https://salfordvictoria.co.uk/ Pics Ill start with some old pictures of the theatre taken from google image search or the above websites. and now not too sure on the date of this Now, looking out from the stage Looking down at the stage bad lens flare The upper circle seating area which has been boarded off seating on the dress circle looking down from the dress circle spiderwebs and pigeon shit fill the upper levels. Looking up from the dress circle level to the awesome ceiling. the stalls/stage level more spider webby goodness above one of the boxes next to the stage the back of the curved plaster ceiling above the stage stripped seating in a back room the upper circle boarded off The stage level cheap Down into the basement and underneath eh stage underneath the stage. The wooden levers you can see operated various trapdoors and other stage type thingamabobs. Which is pretty cool. small workshop area Nice tilling Main entrance bingo at its best!
  11. There's still a few about, obviously nowhere near as many as there was though, but still a few. It's mad some places you go and you can see 3/4 former theatres all within a few hundred yards of eachother. All of different sizes, and level of glam but most converted to furniture shops lol but yeah it's a shame when ones like this get left to just deteriorate to the point of no return. Thanks, it's always a bit of a pain in the arse with the garish colour schemes in these places, and with the lighting.....when it works
  12. great use of lighting in there shots. As said grim place, but belting photo's. Particularly liking the first one with all of the cobwebs.
  13. some cool locos there man
  14. Some cool motors there especially that silver Eclat Riviera I think it is. Quite a rare motor only a few hundred of them were made.
  15. Nicely done mate, liking the long corridor/pipe run shots
  16. That bar area is lovely. Vibing them seats
  17. History Tullis Russell was formed in 1809 by Robert Tullis, he acquired Rothes mill in 1836. In 1912 the construction of Markinch Power Station began, to provide the mill with electrical power, rather than power provided from water wheel. The Coal Fired Power Station was completed in 1914, and was fitted with 3 Parsons Units and Rerolle electrical equipment. At some point, I have no definite date, but the power station was extended to take a fourth slightly larger, more modern Parsons unit along with an English Electric system to distribute the power it generated. It was also given an oil fired system to work alongside the coal fired boilers. Sadly, the plant was deemed too dirty after breeching EU emission regulations and was forced to close been replaced by the new biomass plant on site. For a mothballed site though, it's still very much live, all the power is still on and the readouts in the control room as still showing live stats for the power station. It wouldn't take much to raise steam and get her running again! Explore One that i've been meaning to do for a couple of years having seen some seriously epic report on the place it sadly never happened with it being so far away. Big mistake by myself as always, as you will see. Visited with @GK_WAX it was a good day out and good to finally see it. Didn't manage to get any more photo's as we planned to get the boiler house and other bits done on the way out but got collared by a worker in there stripping the turbines We hid behind a switchboard for about 40 minutes with no where to go. The only possible way out was where he came from or back through the small window he was boarding back up. Luckily he was a sound guy and we had a natter about the place before he escorted us out. The metal fairies had been in before Christmas and it seems this has kicked the demo team up the arse to press on. It won't have long left, access was a bit of a faff due to the amount of chomping and concrete rubble blocking everything. Pics A sorry sight to behold indeed
  18. Yeah that’s what Damo said about the thumbnails. I don’t know why they are small. They look fine on my computer and my phone and i’ve iploaded them the same as my other reports. Weird. yeah its a shame its so trashed now but it was a good un non the less
  19. Cheers Andy, Yeah it was. The metal fairies have been in since and it’s looking a bit worse for wear.
  20. Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
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