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Albino-jay

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Albino-jay last won the day on February 11

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About Albino-jay

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  1. Yeah it's one that i would re visit if i was ever up that way with a spare half hour or so. It's different and pretty interesting. Easy enough that you can leave the mrs in the car too lol
  2. haha its the truth! aww shite, its because i had the 12" version of Bronski Beat, Smalltown boy as the music hahaha bullshit copyright. I guess I will have to re do it with some royalty free crap.
  3. One from back In Jan As the weekend approached, as did another explore for myself @eoa and @monk. Seems we are a good trio of bell ends and something usually goes wrong somewhere down the line and Moel Fferna wasn’t going to let us (or shall I say me) down. Anyway, Myself and @EOA started the day with our customary maccies breakfast (minus the spiced cookie latte this time) we then met @Monk nearer to the mine. We’d heard the walk was a bit of a pig upto the mine so we opted to utilise the jeep which took us as close as we could manage, but still a bit of a walk away. Ah well it saved our legs A LOT. The weather was, well, yeah…. you can see from the pictures! So after a bit of a trek through the snow we found the air shaft and @EOA worked his ropey magic and rigged up 2 lines for us noobz (me and @Monk) to covert absolute pro umbex urbseil down the shaft to have amooch around the mine! Top day, the mine is bloody huge, unfortunately we didn’t find the bridge of death as we only had wellies and it was a tad too deep for us to carry on that way. So a return trip isin order. As I said earlier, Moel Fferna wasn’t to let me down. As I was trying to ascend out of the chamber I put all of my weight on my right leg pushed up and POP my knee let go. I managed to get myself out and hobble back to the car. Turns out I have partially tore a ligament off my bone and damaged my meniscus. YAY. All in all another fucking epic mooch with two top blokes in some mint weather conditions playing with ropes, beers, mines and cameras. AWESOME Update. So I have been to the fracture clinic I'm awaiting a scan but the consultant is very confident i have torn my cartilage and will need keyhole surgery. Great History Early workings tended to be in surface pits, but as the work progressed downwards, it became necessary to work underground. This was often accompanied by the driving of one or more adits to gain direct access to a Level. In some rare instances, such as here (Moel Fferna), there is no trace of surface workings and the workings were entiely underground. Moel Frerna has chambers which follow the slate vein, connected via a series of horizontal Floors (or 'Levels'). The chambers vary in size and are divided by 'pillars' or walls which support the roof. The floors are connected by 'Inclines' which used wedge-shaped trolleys to move trucks between levels. At Moel Fferna a team could produce up to 35 tons of finished slate a week. In 1877 they received about 7 shillings a ton for this. After paying wages for the manager, clerks and 'trammers' the company could make a clear profit of twice this amount. This system was not finally abolished until after the Second World War. Pics Here we are at the top of the airshaft whilst @EOA rigs it up. (don’t we look like pros?) @monk abseiling in. we did have an electron ladder there too but its bloody awkward so it was easier to just abseil in past it. @EOA urbseiling in The first few sections of the mine are very damp and a pain to photograph due to the amount f moisture in the air. This was the flooded section. It was just above wellies but we couldn’t be arsed getting wet feet. @EOA did though because he is a balloon. @Monk snapping away It’s hard to gauge the size of these chambers even with myself in the shot you don’t get a true feel for the sheer scale of them Pikied carriages RIP ladder Some of the Graff 33ri3 wheelbarrow pushed around by the headless mine man. On the 12th hour of everyday you can hear the squeak of the pikied wheel. There was plenty of cool little walkways between the chambers. A winch still in situ up at the top too. The most photogenic rusty old pump in existence. Last but not least another groupshot underneath the cog support. Oh and if anyone is interested a quick video chucked together. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc_8V5x3KDo" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  4. Certainly is. Still a good un though. Doesn't look like much changes other than the thickness of the pigeon shit
  5. Wow! that is unreal. As epic as it comes in my eyes. Top stuff.
  6. Yep as Andy said that row of lathes is something else. Nicely captured. Can't beat a bit of big industry
  7. Amazing find! Them projectors are veryyyy noice
  8. Grimsby Ice Factory Visited with @EOA and @eastyham after our first stop was a failure and without a back up plan we were struggling so up to Grimsby it was. Good choice. Cracking place this. Old as fook, plenty of decay, rot, growth, shonky floors and endless amounts of pigeon poop. I walked across the bridge of doom but couldn’t really go much further as the floors and stairs are collapsing in the other building. It didn’t look too interesting anyway to be honest. Grabbed some old pictures off google so ive wanged them in here too because I think its proper mint when you can compare times gone by with the derps of today. History The Factory was opened on the 7th of October 1901 as a joint venture between the Grimsby Ice Company and the Grimsby Co-operative Ice Company. The Grimsby Ice Company was initially founded in 1863 by local fishermen to import ice from Norway to help them preserve the fish that they caught, by 1900 however it was obvious that they would have to begin to source ice from elsewhere as the for ice, what made matters worse was that the Norwegians began to charge more for exporting their ice and the supply of ice was unreliable... Hence the need for an ice factory at home. The Original Refrigeration Plant on site where 4 steam powered Pontifex horizontal double-acting ammonia compressors which would operate at 50rpm. These where powered by vertical, triple-expansion steam engines, the steam for these engines where generated from six 30ft long Lancashire boilers. A few changes where made between opening and 1931, changes such as the superheating of the Lancashire boilers and the purchase of a few more bits of kit from the Linde British Refrigerating Company however the majority of the facility stayed the same... Until 1931 when a modernization program under the direction of F A Fleming MBE, who was the General manger at the ice factory at the time was put into place. The program included the installation of four J&E Hall Compressors and Metropolitan Vickers Electrical equipment, replacing the Old Pontifex Compressors and Steam Engines. The specification for the new plant demanded an output of 1,100 tons of ice per day under ordinary working conditions, and by utilising the existing tanks without increasing the number of cans. The use of steam was to be entirely dispensed with and means to be provided for heating the thawing water without the use of electrical heaters. Much as today, this had to be achieved with equipment of the greatest efficiency. Sadly the high demands for ice where short lived, episodes such as the cod wars and the general decline in the British fishing industry led to several units been shut down by 1976, and in 1990 the factory closed it's doors and shut down. Today it is owned by Associated British Ports and is left derelict, although preservationists have tried to save the building, their efforts have sadly so far been in vain. Even though the place makes a great opportunity for us explorers I would like to think it would be saved eventually as the factory is now a unique survivor of a now otherwise extinct industry, that said, I do have my doubts... Pics I’ll start off with one from the depths of google. Two blokes looking rather proud next to one of the compressors. Not a clue of the date but it looks fairly clean and new. I didn’t take these pictures with the intention of getting them at similar angles and what not it was purely coincidence, but has worked ok ish. Looking at the same machine now A couple of control panels that were next to the above compressor Another oldie and the same machine now Looking down on the compressor hall and from the same walkway 1930ish? Moving onto other parts of the factory there was a room with these bins filling the whole floor. These were filled with water from the hoses at the end seen here Frozen. Then moved along on these cranes dumped at the end like this (this isn’t Grimsby) Then slid into the crusher So yeah. Unusual. I doubt I will ever explore another Ice factory so that’s pretty cool. Some more shots of the place. I’ll finish on a picture of the old steam powered compressors.
  9. Morris Marina pickup more Marinas. this time an estate and a pick up. 306 lol Austin Maxi Ford Corsair
  10. That DS and BMW E3 are pure porn. Id love to rescue them. Funny how theres always a marina rotting away somewhere lol
  11. I think he just does runs up around the whole quarry complex. We thought it was dropping a load of workers off at the live bit until it got closer. Be handy to get a lift to the top off it to be honest. The walk up is a bastard
  12. cheers mate. Ive been over here for a while I just never bother posting. a bit busier with it these days so ill try and keep active.
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