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Albino-jay

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Everything posted by Albino-jay

  1. History The Art Deco cinema was designed for the Union Cinema Circuit by renowned architects Verity and Beverley. It opened on 23rd July 1937 but was shortly taken over by ABC (Associated British Cinemas) in October that year. It became a Ritz in the 60’s and was used as a cinema up until it’s closure on 18th June 1984 when it was taken over as a bingo hall until that then closed in 2008. Grade II listed due to it’s highly decorative interior of an Art Deco, Neo-Egyptian and Chinoiserie inspired decoration. Which of very few survive now. Here’s a pretty cool video I’ve linked from Youtube with some cracking old images of the place along with a recording of the Compton Organ being played there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Ej2LEqDEQ Our Visit I’d seen @AndyK and @Spidermonkey had been here a few weeks back, followed by @dweebs report also, so with the 28 meet being in Brum it was the perfect opportunity to get over and have a look. Pretty straight forward as it seems it had quite a bit of traffic earlier in the week to which I noticed the lights were on. Which is ideal as it’s a pain in the arse light painting these massive auditoriums. Visited with @ferret, @drew howe and @slayaaa. Not too much left from it’s cinema days but still a good un non the less. Pics I’ve included a couple of old photos dragged up from Google and a couple of screengrabs of the above mentioned video for comparison. Starting with some externals Foyer Moving onto the auditorium Some old graffiti behind the stage/screen area A lot of money for it’s day this, and still now to be fair. I certainly wouldn’t mind winning that. Original seating, covered in cobwebs. and to finish on “The shot”
  2. I’d had my eye on this place for years. I’m from Prestwich so only up the road and I remember going past the Rialto further up where there is now a maccies and past this place on our way into town as a kid. I lived in Broughton briefly about 5 years ago and used to keep an eye on it, however it was always well sealed. Visited with @EOA initially and @Host and @CameraShy joined us later. History Built in 1899 by the Broughton Theatres Syndicate Ltd, Victoria Theatre opened in December 1900. Less than a year after opening it was used as a cinema (although sadly there is no signs of cinema use left) Seating was extended from 2,000 upto 3,000 in 1910 and between 1919 and 1919 it was used as a theatre again. It was then used as a cinema again until it closed in 1958 when it was then used as a clothing/furniture store until 1973 when it was an unsuccessful bingo hall, which closed shortly after. It remained closed until the 80s when it opened up as Bingo hall, which it remained until its closure in 2008 under the Palace name. Its Grade II listed and on the theatres at risk register. More info can be found here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Theatre,_Salford http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/SalfordTheatres.htm#victoria https://salfordvictoria.co.uk/ Pics Ill start with some old pictures of the theatre taken from google image search or the above websites. and now not too sure on the date of this Now, looking out from the stage Looking down at the stage bad lens flare The upper circle seating area which has been boarded off seating on the dress circle looking down from the dress circle spiderwebs and pigeon shit fill the upper levels. Looking up from the dress circle level to the awesome ceiling. the stalls/stage level more spider webby goodness above one of the boxes next to the stage the back of the curved plaster ceiling above the stage stripped seating in a back room the upper circle boarded off The stage level cheap Down into the basement and underneath eh stage underneath the stage. The wooden levers you can see operated various trapdoors and other stage type thingamabobs. Which is pretty cool. small workshop area Nice tilling Main entrance bingo at its best!
  3. Thats bloody cool. Reminds me of a Zzapp ice cream from the 90s!
  4. Not a massive fan of houses, but when it’s old and pretty untouched. Thats a different matter. Yes yes yes. Nicely photographed.
  5. Love a bit of Brutalism. Them red couch seats look reyt comfy! Mint pics of the place
  6. Thats different. Nice work. Really liking that.
  7. History Tullis Russell was formed in 1809 by Robert Tullis, he acquired Rothes mill in 1836. In 1912 the construction of Markinch Power Station began, to provide the mill with electrical power, rather than power provided from water wheel. The Coal Fired Power Station was completed in 1914, and was fitted with 3 Parsons Units and Rerolle electrical equipment. At some point, I have no definite date, but the power station was extended to take a fourth slightly larger, more modern Parsons unit along with an English Electric system to distribute the power it generated. It was also given an oil fired system to work alongside the coal fired boilers. Sadly, the plant was deemed too dirty after breeching EU emission regulations and was forced to close been replaced by the new biomass plant on site. For a mothballed site though, it's still very much live, all the power is still on and the readouts in the control room as still showing live stats for the power station. It wouldn't take much to raise steam and get her running again! Explore One that i've been meaning to do for a couple of years having seen some seriously epic report on the place it sadly never happened with it being so far away. Big mistake by myself as always, as you will see. Visited with @GK_WAX it was a good day out and good to finally see it. Didn't manage to get any more photo's as we planned to get the boiler house and other bits done on the way out but got collared by a worker in there stripping the turbines We hid behind a switchboard for about 40 minutes with no where to go. The only possible way out was where he came from or back through the small window he was boarding back up. Luckily he was a sound guy and we had a natter about the place before he escorted us out. The metal fairies had been in before Christmas and it seems this has kicked the demo team up the arse to press on. It won't have long left, access was a bit of a faff due to the amount of chomping and concrete rubble blocking everything. Pics A sorry sight to behold indeed
  8. History "Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with a demolition order which was denied but as recently been re-submitted with agreed amendments." Visited with @EOA and @Ferret bumped into @little_ boy_explores on the way out too. Quite a relaxed one, heard stories of dogs but nothing to be seen. The alarm wasn't on when we went but it was when I popped back. Pot luck with this one I think. It has a bit of everything though so although it's been hammered it's deffo worth a look in. Pics
  9. Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
  10. One from back In Jan As the weekend approached, as did another explore for myself @eoa and @monk. Seems we are a good trio of bell ends and something usually goes wrong somewhere down the line and Moel Fferna wasn’t going to let us (or shall I say me) down. Anyway, Myself and @EOA started the day with our customary maccies breakfast (minus the spiced cookie latte this time) we then met @Monk nearer to the mine. We’d heard the walk was a bit of a pig upto the mine so we opted to utilise the jeep which took us as close as we could manage, but still a bit of a walk away. Ah well it saved our legs A LOT. The weather was, well, yeah…. you can see from the pictures! So after a bit of a trek through the snow we found the air shaft and @EOA worked his ropey magic and rigged up 2 lines for us noobz (me and @Monk) to covert absolute pro umbex urbseil down the shaft to have amooch around the mine! Top day, the mine is bloody huge, unfortunately we didn’t find the bridge of death as we only had wellies and it was a tad too deep for us to carry on that way. So a return trip isin order. As I said earlier, Moel Fferna wasn’t to let me down. As I was trying to ascend out of the chamber I put all of my weight on my right leg pushed up and POP my knee let go. I managed to get myself out and hobble back to the car. Turns out I have partially tore a ligament off my bone and damaged my meniscus. YAY. All in all another fucking epic mooch with two top blokes in some mint weather conditions playing with ropes, beers, mines and cameras. AWESOME Update. So I have been to the fracture clinic I'm awaiting a scan but the consultant is very confident i have torn my cartilage and will need keyhole surgery. Great History Early workings tended to be in surface pits, but as the work progressed downwards, it became necessary to work underground. This was often accompanied by the driving of one or more adits to gain direct access to a Level. In some rare instances, such as here (Moel Fferna), there is no trace of surface workings and the workings were entiely underground. Moel Frerna has chambers which follow the slate vein, connected via a series of horizontal Floors (or 'Levels'). The chambers vary in size and are divided by 'pillars' or walls which support the roof. The floors are connected by 'Inclines' which used wedge-shaped trolleys to move trucks between levels. At Moel Fferna a team could produce up to 35 tons of finished slate a week. In 1877 they received about 7 shillings a ton for this. After paying wages for the manager, clerks and 'trammers' the company could make a clear profit of twice this amount. This system was not finally abolished until after the Second World War. Pics Here we are at the top of the airshaft whilst @EOA rigs it up. (don’t we look like pros?) @monk abseiling in. we did have an electron ladder there too but its bloody awkward so it was easier to just abseil in past it. @EOA urbseiling in The first few sections of the mine are very damp and a pain to photograph due to the amount f moisture in the air. This was the flooded section. It was just above wellies but we couldn’t be arsed getting wet feet. @EOA did though because he is a balloon. @Monk snapping away It’s hard to gauge the size of these chambers even with myself in the shot you don’t get a true feel for the sheer scale of them Pikied carriages RIP ladder Some of the Graff 33ri3 wheelbarrow pushed around by the headless mine man. On the 12th hour of everyday you can hear the squeak of the pikied wheel. There was plenty of cool little walkways between the chambers. A winch still in situ up at the top too. The most photogenic rusty old pump in existence. Last but not least another groupshot underneath the cog support. Oh and if anyone is interested a quick video chucked together. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dc_8V5x3KDo" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe>
  11. Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list. Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way. Really enjoyed it in here. The floors are mega dodgy towards the front of the building but it is rather lovely along that side where the old dressing rooms are. I particularly loved the fly loft level with the old painted signs and poster remains. History The Doncaster Grand was constructed in 1899 and originally stood on a prominent site in a shopping street facing the main railway station. However, town centre improvements robbed it of any sensible context and it is no longer in a street, but attached rather indirectly to the Frenchgate shopping centre. It still faces the station, however is separated from it by a busy inner ring road which comes so close that it has actually snipped off a lower corner of the stage house. It was threatened with demolition until an energetic local campaign and Friends group secured statutory designation in 1994. The frontage, which, with an improved setting, could again become a local landmark, is three-storeyed. Baroque in treatment, with a complex rhythm of bays articulated by coupled and single pilasters and groupings of arched windows and doorways all rendered. There is a large broken segmental pediment over the three central bays with date 1899. It retains an intimate auditorium. Two well curved balconies with good plasterwork on fronts, the upper gallery is benched. Single pedimented and delicately decorated plasterwork boxes in otherwise plain side walls, flanking a decorative plasterwork rectangular-framed 7.9m (26ft) proscenium. More decorative drops to the ante-proscenium walls, bolection mouldings and plasterwork panels to the stalls and ceiling. Deep central oval ceiling dome. The Grand could quite readily be restored and reopened. It could offer amateur and community drama and musical productions, small scale touring and other activities to complement Doncaster's new venue, Cast. Pics It’s so weird seeing a building as grand as this just surrounded by utter tripe. The old dressing rooms. There was some pipework from the old gas lamps remaining in here. And then the newer porcelain roses with brass? Conduit. This whole side of the building was rotten. It looks like the flat roof bit behind the grand façade is holding water and pissing in when its bad. one of too proper cool dated bar areas. My idea of heaven. A theatre brewdog. For the la la la la LADZ Not sure if this was a ticket or a newspaper clipping? This tiling reminds of any sort of leisure site back when I was a kid. The other bar on the top level. This was suoer cool for me. Not looking good for itself here. Some great art deco styling on the seats. Im guessing this upstairs part was shut off for years whilst it was a bingo hall. LBL? and some old pictures I found on google from when it was a bingo hall.
  12. Grimsby Ice Factory Visited with @EOA and @eastyham after our first stop was a failure and without a back up plan we were struggling so up to Grimsby it was. Good choice. Cracking place this. Old as fook, plenty of decay, rot, growth, shonky floors and endless amounts of pigeon poop. I walked across the bridge of doom but couldn’t really go much further as the floors and stairs are collapsing in the other building. It didn’t look too interesting anyway to be honest. Grabbed some old pictures off google so ive wanged them in here too because I think its proper mint when you can compare times gone by with the derps of today. History The Factory was opened on the 7th of October 1901 as a joint venture between the Grimsby Ice Company and the Grimsby Co-operative Ice Company. The Grimsby Ice Company was initially founded in 1863 by local fishermen to import ice from Norway to help them preserve the fish that they caught, by 1900 however it was obvious that they would have to begin to source ice from elsewhere as the for ice, what made matters worse was that the Norwegians began to charge more for exporting their ice and the supply of ice was unreliable... Hence the need for an ice factory at home. The Original Refrigeration Plant on site where 4 steam powered Pontifex horizontal double-acting ammonia compressors which would operate at 50rpm. These where powered by vertical, triple-expansion steam engines, the steam for these engines where generated from six 30ft long Lancashire boilers. A few changes where made between opening and 1931, changes such as the superheating of the Lancashire boilers and the purchase of a few more bits of kit from the Linde British Refrigerating Company however the majority of the facility stayed the same... Until 1931 when a modernization program under the direction of F A Fleming MBE, who was the General manger at the ice factory at the time was put into place. The program included the installation of four J&E Hall Compressors and Metropolitan Vickers Electrical equipment, replacing the Old Pontifex Compressors and Steam Engines. The specification for the new plant demanded an output of 1,100 tons of ice per day under ordinary working conditions, and by utilising the existing tanks without increasing the number of cans. The use of steam was to be entirely dispensed with and means to be provided for heating the thawing water without the use of electrical heaters. Much as today, this had to be achieved with equipment of the greatest efficiency. Sadly the high demands for ice where short lived, episodes such as the cod wars and the general decline in the British fishing industry led to several units been shut down by 1976, and in 1990 the factory closed it's doors and shut down. Today it is owned by Associated British Ports and is left derelict, although preservationists have tried to save the building, their efforts have sadly so far been in vain. Even though the place makes a great opportunity for us explorers I would like to think it would be saved eventually as the factory is now a unique survivor of a now otherwise extinct industry, that said, I do have my doubts... Pics I’ll start off with one from the depths of google. Two blokes looking rather proud next to one of the compressors. Not a clue of the date but it looks fairly clean and new. I didn’t take these pictures with the intention of getting them at similar angles and what not it was purely coincidence, but has worked ok ish. Looking at the same machine now A couple of control panels that were next to the above compressor Another oldie and the same machine now Looking down on the compressor hall and from the same walkway 1930ish? Moving onto other parts of the factory there was a room with these bins filling the whole floor. These were filled with water from the hoses at the end seen here Frozen. Then moved along on these cranes dumped at the end like this (this isn’t Grimsby) Then slid into the crusher So yeah. Unusual. I doubt I will ever explore another Ice factory so that’s pretty cool. Some more shots of the place. I’ll finish on a picture of the old steam powered compressors.
  13. Yeah it's one that i would re visit if i was ever up that way with a spare half hour or so. It's different and pretty interesting. Easy enough that you can leave the mrs in the car too lol
  14. haha its the truth! aww shite, its because i had the 12" version of Bronski Beat, Smalltown boy as the music hahaha bullshit copyright. I guess I will have to re do it with some royalty free crap.
  15. Certainly is. Still a good un though. Doesn't look like much changes other than the thickness of the pigeon shit
  16. Wow! that is unreal. As epic as it comes in my eyes. Top stuff.
  17. Yep as Andy said that row of lathes is something else. Nicely captured. Can't beat a bit of big industry
  18. Amazing find! Them projectors are veryyyy noice
  19. This was my first ever trip down a mine. So a massive thanks to @EOA for making it happen and another massive thanks to @monk and his daughter for being excellent guides. It was bloody awesome, I could've spent all day poking around the sheds at the top tbh. Underground however was just amazing. It's bloody big this place so a return visit over a couple of days with many more mine beers is a must. History copied from the ever faithful Wikipedia. Obviously. Maenofferen was first worked for slate by men from the nearby Diphwys quarry shortly after 1800. By 1848 slate was being shipped via the Ffestiniog Railway, but traffic on the railway ceased in 1850. In 1857 traffic resumed briefly and apart from a gap in 1865, a steady flow of slate was dispatched via the railway. The initial quarry on the site was known as the David Jones quarry which was the highest and most easterly of what became the extensive Maenofferen complex. In 1861 the Maenofferen Slate Quarry Co. Ltd. was incorporated, producing around 400 tons of slate that year. The company leased a wharf at Porthmadog in 1862 and shipped 181 tons of finished slate over the Ffestiniog Railway the following year. During the nineteenth century the quarry flourished and expanded, extending its workings underground and further downhill towards Blaenau Ffestiniog. By 1897 it employed 429 people with almost half of those working underground. The Ffestiniog Railway remained the quarry's major transport outlet for its products, but there was no direct connection from it to the Ffestiniog's terminus at Duffws. Instead slate was sent via the Rhiwbach Tramway which ran through the quarry. This incurred extra shipping costs that rival quarries did not have to bear. In 1908 the company leased wharf space at Minffordd, installing turntables and siding to allow finished slates to be transshipped to the standard gauge railway there. In 1920 the company solved its high shipping costs by building a new incline connecting its mill to the Votty & Bowydd quarry and reaching agreement to ship its products via that company's incline connection to the Ffestiniog Railway at Duffws. Modern untopping operations at Maenofferen. The uncovered chambers of the Bowydd workings are clearly visible In 1928 Maenofferen purchased the Rhiwbach quarry, continuing to work it and use its associated Tramway until 1953. When the Ffestiniog Railway ceased operation in 1946, Maenofferen leased a short length of the railway's tracks between Duffws station and the interchange with the LMS railway, west of Blaenau Ffestiniog. Slate trains continued to run over this section until 1962, Maenofferen then becoming the last slate quarry to use any part of the Ffestiniog Railway's route. From 1962 slate was shipped from the quarry by road, although the internal quarry tramways including stretches of the Rhiwbach tramway continued in use until at least the 1980s. The quarry was purchased by the nearby Llechwedd quarry in 1975 together with Bowydd, which also incorporated the old Votty workings: these are owned by the Maenofferen Company. Underground production at Maenofferen ceased during November 1999 and with it the end of large-scale underground working for slate in north Wales. Production of slate recommenced on the combined Maenofferen site, consisting of "untopping" underground workings to recover slate from the supporting pillars of the chambers. Material recovered from the quarry tips will also be recovered for crushing and subsequent use. Anyway onto my poto’s My first ever photo down a mine.
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