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AndyK!

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AndyK! last won the day on October 14

AndyK! had the most liked content!

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About AndyK!

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    Full Member
  • Birthday 04/17/1981

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    http://www.bcd-urbex.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Grimsby, UK

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  1. Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing. History The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day! The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed. By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye. The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped. Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool On the helipad View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out View across the deck View in the other direction towards the crane Derrick and flare stack On the top deck where the drilling happened Hook and winch equipment The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled Heading below deck we find a workshop And various plant rooms There were various rooms for deployment of workers Sick bay The workers accommodation was pretty basic Central control room The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block One of the emergency lifeboats Sign on the side of the platform
  2. Wow this is very nice, those old cells and doors are amazing
  3. I love how dated everything looks in this place, a real snapshot of another time. Well photographed.
  4. Interesting little time trap there.
  5. Asking for locations on a public forum is not the way to go about this. By all means, use the forum to see what others have posted in specific areas, but asking out right without posting any content of your own isn't going to get you very far. Please post up a few reports, and people may be willing to help.
  6. Fantastic mix of details and decay.
  7. Interesting, I especially like the first picture. You've done a good job capturing these images in such tight spaces.
  8. Thanks Andy, really appreciate your comments. That was my favourite too
  9. HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates. Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence) The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966. The original Holloway Prison (public domain image) Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing. Time to start the unofficial tour.... Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds Let's head straight into the cells... Dorm room Single prisoner cell Another dorm room Mural in one of the many winding corridors Twin room Lots of peely paint in some places There were several styles of cell Entrance into the prison... Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass Corridors lead into the prison Each area separated by iron gates Prisoner amenities and facilities Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre. Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use And gym facilities The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians Pharmacy Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls The chapel was large but pretty basic More inmate artwork Mural inside one of the rooms A room for presentations The prison's boiler house Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls High fences divided the exterior areas
  10. Ha I can't believe this place still has power on! Amazing.
  11. You got some fantastic pictures of the chapel
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