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AndyK!

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Everything posted by AndyK!

  1. Welcome to the forum, thanks for posting. That's a nice place, and good use of the available light in your shots too. 👍
  2. The history of Coalbrookdale foundry dates back all the way to 1572 when the land was passed to John Brooke who developed coal mining there on a substantial scale. A blast furnace was built at the site to produce iron, which blew up in 1703. It remained derelict until the arrival of Abraham Darby I in 1709. Abraham Darby I set about rebuilding the Coalbrookdale Furnace, using coke as the fuel. His business was that of an iron founder, making cast iron pots and other goods, an activity in which he was particularly successful because of his patented foundry method, which enabled him to produce cheaper pots than his rivals. The furnace was the first coke-fired blast furnace to operate successfully for a prolonged period of time. The Coalbrookdale Foundry – this area has since been converted into a museum Following the death of Abraham Darby II, Abraham Darby II was brought into the business as an assistant manager when old enough. The Company also became early suppliers of steam engine cylinders in this period. Experiments took place with the application of coke pig iron to the production of bar iron in charcoal finery forges. This proved to be a success, and led to the beginning of a great expansion in coke iron making. In 1768, the company began to produce the first cast iron rails for railways. In 1778, Abraham Darby III undertook the building of the world’s first cast iron bridge, the iconic Iron Bridge, opened in 1780. The fame of this bridge leads many people today to associate the Industrial Revolution with the neighbouring village of Ironbridge, but in fact most of the work was done at Coalbrookdale, as there was no settlement at Ironbridge in the eighteenth century. Workers boots hung on the front gate The blast furnaces were closed down, perhaps as early as the 1820s, but the foundries remained in use. The Coalbrookdale Company became part of an alliance of iron founding companies who were absorbed by Allied Iron founders Limited in 1929. This was in turn taken over by Glynwed which has since become Aga Foodservice. Castings for Aga Rayburn cookers were produced at Coalbrookdale until its closure in November 2017. Delivery yard, where the raw materials and scrap iron arrive One of the two cupolas, seen from the melt shop delivery yard Archive image of molten iron being taken from the cupola Number 1 cupola. This mini blast furnace melted the iron ready to be cast. Number 2 furnace Above the furnaces Compressors which blew air into the cupolas Rear of the furnaces Ladles hanging from an overhead rail system for transporting molten iron One of the ladles Moving into the casting area where we find racks of moulds Patterns laid out on the floor Patterns laid out on the floor The main casting shop contains a fair bit of automated casting equipment Beside the production line with wagons on rails for transporting castings Casting production line Casting production line End of the casting line Casting machine, where the molten iron is pored into Archive image of molten iron being poured into cast Automated production lines Automated production lines Tanks and conveyors Towards the end of the factory we find more machinery Forklift trucks Cherry picker Extraction hoods in an old part of the site The workshops shop contained a handful of machines Dress in the machine shop A pair of drills More drill-presses Finally, some of their finished products – an Aga in the canteen along with a Rangemaster fridge
  3. Indeed, I have heard about those which was why I asked. Glad it didn't go that way for you
  4. Some nice pics there, shame your visit was cut short. Any problems, or all ok in the end?
  5. Loved this place so much! Cracking photos there monkey boy
  6. That's a cool old theatre! Can you add an approximate location and approximate date to the title please - also is the UK location tag correct? I can fix these for you if preferred, just let me know
  7. I really like the style of your pictures, and I also really like the style of this building - it's a shame it's been demolished
  8. That's cool, I like how nature is reclaiming the track
  9. Nice pics there, loving the light beams
  10. Add your photos of peely paint!
  11. Cracking pics. I love that tree out the front!
  12. Never seen this before, nice one Trev!
  13. This is absolutely fantastic! I love the textures and colours.
  14. Awesome job! The place is looking pretty tidy at the moment.
  15. Thanks for posting! That's great for only your second explore, well covered. I've made a few changes to your report - I toned down the title a little bit and moved it to the residential category (there are plenty of pics there, no need for it to be in Short Reports). We also like an approximate date in the title - I assumed this was recent so added May 2018, but we can change that if required.
  16. Any shots of vintage industrial locations - the older the better!
  17. There really isn't much to see inside now, just some plinths where machinery once stood. I don't remember seeing the columns, but if they are still there they are no longer anything to write home about, sadly. Still a lovely old building though.
  18. What a strange mixture of things in there! The old control panels hidden away amongst the residential is a nice throwback to its former use.
  19. Nice! All that smoke damage adds a cool feel to the place
  20. Ha yes, about 90% of my leads! Somehow I seem to find so many places just a week too late. Please still put a report up on here - we would appreciate that more than a link ?
  21. Very nice place, I love that all thee machines are built using wood.
  22. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
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