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Sectionate

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Sectionate last won the day on June 8

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  1. The internet seems to think that it is still in use! The scenery made half the explore tbh
  2. First time solo exploring: You Slab by S8, on Flickr
  3. Peeling paint you say? Court by S8, on Flickr
  4. I didn't go to Romania with the intention for exploring, I went for a good friends wedding and hadn't even looked at the possibility of skulking around a derp. It turns out on our drive up into the mountains of Prahova, there is an abundance of derelict buildings, closed factories and other sundries left over from the communist era - we passed a huge oil refinery that looked half smashed, yet is still in use apparently; Sinaia has a large fuel injection system manufacturing concern that looks disused, but still builds components for the German companies! There was lots if you were looking for it. But, we didn't come for this. We came for a wedding and a break in the mountains - it is a stunning country and I would highly recommend it. It was only after driving back down from the cable car (awesome 70s retro thing) in Sinaia did we notice a large reinforced concrete Berm. I don't think the car had pulled to a stop before I was running into the bushes, forgetting the warnings of black bears. [/span]From what I can make out (information is limited for obvious reasons), but the track was built between 1974 & 1976. Beyond this, I know nothing else other than it may have been still in use as late as 2009. The course had 11-14 turns. Visited with a whole bunch of non-forum members, for obvious reasons! Anyway, photos Start Area - totally trashed! Run up with start ramp (presumably for another sport) Rickety bridge over the mountain road Banked turn just after the bridge (I expect they were flying by this point) Some sort of stores building - there was a smaller start ramp onto the track here, presumably for beginners Final Bend Finish line and timing booth (now someones house)
  5. This was our first Metz German Fortification of the day and it did not disappoint. GF L'Yser is filled with murals and paintings, which are incredible and fortunately survive after nearly 100 years. Visited with @flat and a few other non-members History: The Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, renamed Group Fortification Yser after 1919, is a military installation near Metz that was constructed between 1907 and 1914. It is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and formed part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz. Must go back Outer fighting block: DDE_5447 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5457 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5459 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5462 copy by Nick, on Flickr Turreted by Nick, on Flickr Main block DDE_5494 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5507 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5511 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5528 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5533 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5543 copy by Nick, on Flickr The Murals DDE_5563 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5506 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5586 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5503 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5588 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5587 copy by Nick, on Flickr
  6. Thanks. It's another good one near Metz - but as you know, you literally drive past 3 to get to where you want to see! We hadn't really thought about it until we went to Michelsberg and the local there told use the roped off areas were suspected mines
  7. Visited recently on my first foray over to the European side of life (can't believe it has taken so long). It was excellent / cold in the snow! History: On May 9, 1899, Kaiser Wilhelm II laid the first stone of Fort St. Blaise. Group Fortification Verdun group is built on top of two hills, it consists of two forts, the fort Sommy 30 ha in the south, and Fort Saint-Blaise 45 ha on the north. Group Fortification Verdun has four 150mm howitzers and six short 100mm guns. Fort St. Blaise was planned for 500 men and fort Sommy for 200 men. It could then receive two infantry companies, in addition to the gunners. St. Blaise, whose fortified barracks could receive 500 people, has 10 observation domes and 12 lookout posts.[4] The water tank's capacity was 1,300 m. 4 diesel engines of 25HP each, providing the energy necessary for Fort St. Blaise. The fort Sommy, including the fortified barracks, could accommodate 200 people, and has 6 observation domes and 8 lookouts. Its water tank could hold 600 m and it had 3 diesel engines of 20HP each, to provide the energy needed for its operation.[4] The coat of arms of Count of Haeseler is carved on the pediment of the door of the fort. It caused the Americans a huge headache in WW2 and proved its worth as a fortified location. Patton underestimated their strength immensely. Fort St. Blaise: The first of the two forts, complete with short 100mm funs in place showing battle damage. Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Collapsed structure / battle damage Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr The thing you don't realise until you get there is that the French Army have not removed any of the barbed wire entanglements, complete with foot spikes and in some places, unexploded ordnance Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Fort Sommy: The smaller outer fort, with a machine gun cupola and two turrets with guns and a tonne more battle damage, with craters and wall collapses all over the shop! Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr Untitled by Nick, on Flickr
  8. I know little of the History tbh. Built during the war as a shelter for the AEI Henleys Cable Works (which would have been an awesome explore) and could hold around 2000 people allegedly; the tunnels were built into old Caves in the Rosherville gardens that occupied the land between the cable works and the cliff face. It is unclear if the tunnels were built by the cable works, or someone else. Beyond that, I know nothing. Visited before shenanigans occurred. Photos (I found it quite difficult not to take the exact same photos as everyone else lol)
  9. It does sound suspicious, the other reason could be that Grade 1 listing was considered on some items and they were ripped out before it could be granted.
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