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anthrax

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anthrax last won the day on July 6

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  1. The secrets of the legendary catacombs of Paris, a tunnel system that spans more than 280km in length. The catacombs in Paris hold remains of more than six million people. They are part of a tunnel network that runs below Paris that is more than 280 kilometers long. No one knows how far the tunnels extend in total, as there are still many paths that are unmapped and even undiscovered. The main reason behind the tunnels was to extract Lutetian limestone for use as a building material. For instance, parts of the Louvre, the Place de la Concorde and Les Invalides were built with limestone from this tunnel system. The catacombs only take up about 2.1km of the tunnel system and they are the only part that is legally accessible. Even though that is the case, many people refer to the surrounding tunnel network when speaking about the "Catacombs of Paris". The ossuary was created in the late 1700s to tackle the problem of overflowing cemeteries and until the early 19th century, the ossuary was largely forgotten until it became a novelty place for concerts and other private events. The network is mostly intact today and is regularily toured by urban explorers or so called "Cataphiles". If anyone is curious about the way we took, the names of the rooms we went into and a bit of a sidestory, here's the full post (warning: It's damn long and I feel it would overcrowd the forums) Also, even though I posted a lot of photos, these are not all, so feel free to check out the rest of them if anyone has gotten curious. LINK: http://inwordsandpictures.net/catacombs FULL-ALBUM: https://flic.kr/s/aHskDMEvnC INSTAGRAM: ofcdnb DSC_9230 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9239 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9241 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9245 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9250 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9254 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9257 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9265_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9276 by anthrax, auf Flickr SC_9279 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9281 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9283_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9290_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9311 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9338 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9343_2 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9346_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  2. Founded in early 1800's the complex was initially used as a hand weaving mill. Following 30 years of manual work the means of production changed when the small mill was bought by a young interpreneur who changed the concept to include hydropower. A few years after that, the mill changed owners again when it was decided to enlargen the mill and convert it into a fully functional factory, instead of a small hydropower driven mill. Successively more and more looms and heavy machinery were added when a textile producer outsourced his production because of monetary advantages. During WW2 the production was stopped and the factory used for producing telecommunication materials for the military. Because of the decline of the texile industry in Europe and outdated machinery the factory had to close for good in the 2000's. Now it's slowly consumed by nature and open for urban explorers like me. Full Album: (70+ photographs) https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669234673708/with/42217673072/ Full Blog Post: http://inwordsandpictures.net/textilefactory DSC_7178 by anthrax, auf Flickr 1 DSC_7224 by anthrax, auf Flickr 2 DSC_7237 by anthrax, auf Flickr 3 DSC_7241_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr 4 DSC_7252 by anthrax, auf Flickr 5 DSC_7259 by anthrax, auf Flickr 6 DSC_7272 by anthrax, auf Flickr 7 DSC_7302 by anthrax, auf Flickr 8 DSC_7308 by anthrax, auf Flickr 9 DSC_7336 by anthrax, auf Flickr 10 DSC_7350 by anthrax, auf Flickr 11 DSC_7382 by anthrax, auf Flickr 12 DSC_7394 by anthrax, auf Flickr 13 DSC_7414 by anthrax, auf Flickr 14 DSC_7425 by anthrax, auf Flickr 15 DSC_7431 by anthrax, auf Flickr 16
  3. I will add more for both posts. Thanks for the feedback If you want to see the full resolution pictures though, you can check them out on the link provided.
  4. I totally forgot to edit these photos of a recent exploration tour. A friend informed me of an abandoned sawmill by the lake so I had to check it out. On location are many different buildings, one where a family once lived in which is not accessible for the behaved urbexer like me, as no windows were broken into or any locks were picked (or rather, doors knocked down). The sawmill wasn't locked off, so I took my chance there. The main floor was used for wood-working while it looks like the other floor helped power the machines for the main floor by hydropower. I even found remains of a saturday night party of a few friends and a shoe on a table! Full: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmcrd3PL
  5. Today I visit some kind of factory buildings near a train station. I'm unsure if this was part of some other factory or if those were standalone buildings. One from the two had a cafeteria, so it appears plausible that this was a seperate firm. I'm saying that because the buildings are located on a industrial area where many companies, warehouses and such are located. Enjoy! Full: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmcr8Da
  6. This is inside of a factory that was once used for producing the somewhat famous Pandur-Tanks. This area of the factory closed sometime in 2015/16, with first signs showing as early as 2010. At first the company decided to restructure by stopping production and only using the plant at this location for tank maintenance, service and repair. When this decision was finalized about 60% of employees were dismissed. Reasoning - there wasn't enough demand for new vehicles. In late 2016 the police was called to a so called "illegal rave" that was held in one of the former production halls. Tens of thousands of euros in equipment were left behind. full story 50+ pics DSC_5646 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6939 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5665 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5724 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5739 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6707 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6743_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6812 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  7. My first real Urban Exploration was done on that airfield. This is where it all began for me and it wasn't even that long ago! The airfield opened in 1936, initially for the usage for civilian air traffic such as sport flying (if that's a word). Not only that but the area was also used for construction of various aircraft-related mechanisms and for supporting the army with weapon technology during the Second World War. The Red Army took over operations after WW2 which explains the signs with cyrillic writing. DSC_4227 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_4266 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_4404 by anthrax, auf Flickr The album with all pictures can be found here and my thorough post here.
  8. Disclaimer: Some of the images displayed in my album contain anti semitic graffiti. I'm not promoting anti semitism here but am only showcasing what's inside this bunker. Today's post is about the exploration of a World War II bunker, that has been abandoned since approximately 1955, when Austria signed the Declaration of Neutrality. Construction began during the war but because of the siege of the Red Army, the bunker was never finished. Nowadays, most of the former exits have been walled off with only one proper entry and exit remaining. Rescuing people trapped in certain areas of the facility would be close to impossible, due to some entrances being filled with stones and mud. You imagine bunkers like concrete mazes and even though it looked like one, it was hard to get lost. It was very easy to navigate around even though the tunnels measure about 700m (0.45 miles) in total. Initially, there were around 5 to 7 entrances throughout the whole structure which made it impossible to get lost. DSC_5054 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5080 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5085 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5090 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5124 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6339 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6351 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6353 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6357 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6369 by anthrax, auf Flickr If anyone is interested in more, the full album of photos can be found here and my post about the structure here.
  9. Hello folks! I recently visited an abandoned military barrack which was used by Pioneers for almost a hundred years. The area is abandoned for a few years now, 2015 the buildings were used for accommodation for refugees. Since somewhere around then, the place sits empty. There are already plans on how the area is going to be used once they tore down the remains of the barracks. A new district housing around 2500 people, a school campus and a kindergarten amongst other things will be built here. All that a car-free zone. Can't say I'm too bummed about that, sounds like it could be a sick project! DSC_6434 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6453 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6463 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6478 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6486 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6494 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6512 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6544 by anthrax, auf Flickr If I could excite you for more, check out the full album here or my post about it here.
  10. Hello, my name is anthrax (well, not really. who would've guessed?) and I'm an Urban Explorer from Austria. Looking forward to join the forums!
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