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Dale68

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Dale68 last won the day on October 28 2018

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About Dale68

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    Mid Wales

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  1. Very nice photos, I really envy the people who make it to there.
  2. Dale68

    UK Amnodd Bwll

    Situated below the mountain of Arenig Fawr sits this cottage not much inside unfortunately. Visited here on Christmas Day. Video here ...https://youtu.be/q3OdocgXOYY
  3. Been wanting to go here for a while... My Video...https://youtu.be/BehD-Z6XgkM History - From http://www.snowdoniaheritage.info/pdf/pilgrims/pilgrims-nefyn/traeth-trefor-english.pdf It was granite quarries that produced the setts to pave city streets. There was great activity in the areas around Penmaenmawr and the Eifl, and people would move from one to the otherthere from other. Samuel Holland was a prominent person in this industry – the father was a pioneer in Ffestiniog and his son in the granite quarries of the Eifl area. The work began here about 1830, and when Trevor Jones became the quarry supervisor the village at the foot of the Eifl - where Trefor got it's name. By 1850 the area’s granite quarries were owned by ‘The Welsh Granite Co. Ltd’. It was bought for £3,000 and the shares were worth £13,000. In 1911 the Penmaenmawr and Llanfairfechan quarries were joined with the Eifl ones to form the ‘Penmaenmawr and Welsh Granite Co. Ltd’. Trefor quarry developed to be the world’s biggest granite quarry, and by 1931 had produced 1,157,000 tons of setts. The quarry is still occasionally active and Trefor granite is used to make curling stones.
  4. I wonder if it sold.. http://www.scargillmann.co.uk/property-detail.asp?propref=31074
  5. I know it's been posted to death, but I thought I'd post anyway.. During the Second World War, high explosive and incendiary bombs were stored in the old quarry, which was chosen because it was accessible by road and railway. Also, its remoteness meant there was a reduced risk to the public if there had been an explosion. Slate waste was spread over the bomb store to camouflage it from German planes. It’s estimated that the storage area inside the quarry was equivalent to two football pitches. The bombs were unloaded in the reconfigured railway sidings after being brought by train directly from the munitions factories where they were made. In the old slate sheds on the site, women workers filled ammunition belts with rounds of bullets for machine guns. When an RAF airbase needed ammunition for its planes, an order would be sent through to Glyn Rhonwy and be delivered by road or by rail. After the war, the tens of thousands of tons of armaments that had not been used were moved to a nearby quarry and detonated, resulting in thick black smoke obscuring the mountains. In the 1950s, a lake formed in the hollow left by the earlier quarrying. The water was removed when specialists began, in 1969, the long process of removing the remaining explosives and triggers. Video here: https://youtu.be/Mzociz6skcM
  6. In the forest sits this stone building, I can't find any info on it other that it's sitting on a settlement mound. Video.. https://youtu.be/nGuRNOeRuA8
  7. That's one of the main reasons for going
  8. Been waiting all week to go here only to find it's all been boarded back . so just some from the outside.☹️
  9. I went last Friday. Nice place for a walk.
  10. Great report. I wish I knew you was going.
  11. What a fantastic place, thanks for sharing
  12. What a shame, love to know the history of why it's just left
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