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Landie_Man

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Landie_Man last won the day on March 5

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About Landie_Man

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  • Birthday 06/24/1990

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  1. I’ve always found that amusing. No idea you’re in the derp lol.
  2. Day two of @Mookster and my first Northern Explore of the year; and in true Mookster style; we get up from our cosy beds and leave the sleepy world of The Premier Inn before breakfast is even a thing in these hotels; a point that hurts me to the core as the Designated Driver, but clearly pays off once the wall of fatigue is overcome. We leave the hotel and take a drive to Bee Hive; this weekend has been a little hit and miss so far; so we have high hopes of this as it had been the Tour Bus stop off of the month; and after parking up and spending much time trying to get inside having been spotted by the sleepy street waking up numerous times; we set about a great explore. This site is very stripped out inside; but the lighting is just divine; the paintwork, features and the things that are left behind are just lovely. We both REALLY enjoyed this one; despite the bareness, it had a really nice feeling about it. - The first of the two mills on this site, was built in 1895, with the second larger mill following soon after, in 1902. The complex was constructed in a rather lovely Italianate style, with staircases disguised as campaniles along with terraced roofing and balustrades and including a very picturesque lodge/office building at the front gate. The mill span cotton up until 1967 when that venture closed. Ever since then; Bee Hive has had various other industrial uses, seemingly most recently it was occupied by a bed/furniture warehouse until they vacated some time ago. The place eventually closed down entirely in 2016 and plans to demolish this beautiful building, despite its protected status have been heavily criticized by the locals; and rightly so. Would be a tragedy. #1 [ #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 As always Guys, thank you for taking the time to look, More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157703821237512
  3. Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  4. Shot back in January; this explore formed part of a Northern Roadtrip with @Mookster. We had previously tried and failed at this place some time ago. It was nice to finally get inside this. We had several fails this weekend; but this was one of our successes. Slaithwaite had several local manufacturers in its local area; whom joined forces in 1887 to create the Globe Worsted Company; a textiles firm. They started out by building a large mill, which was typical of the era. The Globe Worsted Mills were built in two stages. The building of the first, Globe 1 began straight away in 1887 and was completed by the following year. It is thought that Glove 1 was built to a design possibly drawn up by local architect Thomas Varley of Slaithwaite. Globe 1 was 5 stories high and consisted of 33 bays. By 1889; the second phase, Globe 2 was built on the opposite side of the road; with an overhead walkway connecting the two buildings. Globe 2 was slightly different and had 5 stories plus a basement, and had 15 bays. The Globe Worsted company continued from strength to strength over the years, and like many other textile mills; it saw a gradual decline in trade towards the end of the 20th century. The company went into administration in 2004 and the mill closed later that year. The site has been sold to a private developer and a £30 million project is progress to renovate the buildings into a multi-use complex of public and business facilities. The chimney has been demolished as part of the works. Globe Mill 1 is slowly being converted into a pretty stunning looking development; hopefully this mill will follow in its footsteps. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676959136467
  5. This one has a bit of a bittersweet ending for me really/. It's practically on my doorstep but I didn't find out about it till about 2016/17 and it closed in 2010 with much disgust from the locals! I had tried and failed it numerous times because of either filming taking place on site; or workmen. I went to check it out just before Christmas and found it to have a small demo crew inside who very kindly granted me 15 minutes in the pool area only, and they came and checked on me every 3 or 4 mins. It had been partly gutted by this point and they were so nice, I kept to my word and only left with a few photos. Hints were dropped of the quietness of the site around the Christmas Period; but I had my disabled partner, Pearl staying for a few weeks, and I had booked several weeks off work to be with her as to me, that was far more important!!! So I didn't bother returning. Still; I am also glad I didn't leave empty handed! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676566144727
  6. That’s very cool. It’s clearly been empty for decades. Interesting story about the hot water. The things we take for granted! That’s very cool. It’s clearly been empty for decades. Interesting story about the hot water. The things we take for granted!
  7. That's lovely mate! Good to see it shot on film too!
  8. Great to see you as always Tom; looks like you are your good old self over there and that great . It's nice to see proper decay for once; not like our soggy derps; these seem to stand the test of time much better! Hope to see you soon
  9. The end was nigh for Mookster and my North Midlands Roadtrip back before Christmas. Mookster remembered seeing this site when visiting the Crich Tramway Museum in the 1990s and had made it a goal to visit it when he discovered it had not been demolished, he previously thought it had. We parked in the Museum and walked up the driveway to the site. An older chap and some friends who frequent the site and had keys, had been feeding the birds and we exchanged some pleasantries; "As long as your not smashing anything, go for it"; was the general opinion; so we filled our boots. Sadly; much is inaccessible due to flooding; and it is overall, pretty trashed, but it had some great photo ops! I enjoyed it, and the lighting the evening was producing. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678698751578
  10. A rather apt explore after exploring an Iron Works earlier in the morning! After Stanton, Mookster and I headed for this little industrial Gem and met Mattdonut and James Smith inside. It was a bit of a trek through some undergrowth and tumbledown sheds full of all the old moulds and casts; but it was well worth it. The original company at this premises began manufacturing cast iron pipes back in the 1940s. By the 1980s; there was a management buy out and the company was renamed. It then closed again around two decades later and again; changed hands and was renamed; remaining in operation until it closed for the final time a few years ago. The whole site is split in two by a lovely iron railway bridge with the casting storage sheds and workshops on one side and the main foundry building on the other side of the bridge. It was a lovely treasure trove of an explore with plenty to see inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 Thanks For Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706470238285
  11. Another weekend, another backlog! I really need to streamline my reporting process! Part of a little day out with Mookster back before Christmas, we did this Tourist Trail steelworks; and it was a rather nice morning out; albeit a little smashed inside. The works were originally established in 1855 with an office staff of four, three small furnaces, a small foundry; plus iron fields at Stanton and in the neighbourhood parish of Dale Abbey, and the Ironstone Bell pits at Babbington. Messrs George and John Crompton; the three founders; were brothers and partners in the firm of bankers of Crompton and Evans - Mr Newton and Mr. Barber. In the infant years; the pig iron was made entirely from local ore, but in 1865 Northamptonshire ores were introduced into the mixtures; with iron mines in Leceistershire and Northamptonshire acquired and developed. In 1878 the pipe foundry, now potentially the largest in Great Britain, and possibly the world, was started under the management of Mr James Chambers. Circa 1914; the company had 7000 people on its pay roll - 3000 here at Stanton, the same number at the collieries and 1000 at the ironstone mines. In 1951 it was nationalised and became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. A takeover in 1960 by Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd happened. and was merged with Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. to form the Stanton & Staveley company. In 1967 Stanton & Staveley was incorporated into British Steel. During the early 1980s the Stanton site became part of the French Pont-a-Mouson Group and later part of Saint Gobain, manufacturing cast iron pipes. Production finally ceased on May 24th 2007, and subsequently a huge amount of the site was demolished around 2009/2010. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678405612458
  12. Cooor, that is lovely. I did try it a while ago and failed. I will get back here for absolute sure
  13. I want to check this one out. Its a way away though so I may need to factor it into a roadtrip
  14. I guess so! Never thought I'd hear those two in the same sentence!
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