Jump to content

Landie_Man

FULL MEMBER
  • Content Count

    477
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    20

Landie_Man last won the day on April 9

Landie_Man had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

248 Popular Member

2 Followers

About Landie_Man

  • Rank
    Full Member
  • Birthday 06/24/1990

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/collections/72157622673908716/

Profile Information

  • Location
    Aylesbury

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. It smelt too? That is surprising as it wouldn’t be decomposing at this stage. That said, there would be intestines and things cut out of animals....
  2. It does sound grim! I do love meat, but this is the one side of it I do not like the sound of! The sick books here were for each person, rather than an entire sick book. The same person seemed to get ill all the time!
  3. After seeing Mookster's report of this site a couple of weeks ago; and it being fairly local, I decided I would check it out on my days off work. A friend of mine on Facebook whom I know through other hobbies had expressed interest in an explore with me the day before I had planned to go; so we decided that I would pick him up in the morning and we would go for the hour drive to the location. It was nice to put another face to a name who I'd spoken to for quite some time. The weather that morning had been pretty bad through and through and was forecast to only get worse, but thankfully the rain stopped; and we had a reasonable few hours of weather as we went inside the Abattoir. I had mixed feelings overall about going into the site, nothing eerie or spooky of course, I'm not a YouTuber; but of the side of meat consumption which I always try to forget about. It was pretty cold inside as expected and clinical. I'm not sure I would have wanted to work here. The site is very big and took quite a few hours to do. It was largely trashed and stripped, but the offices really redeemed the devastation downstairs and were stuffed full of things to pick and rifle through. After a very pleasant explore, we walked through the abandoned Garden Centre next door back to my car and stopped off for lunch at a Buddies USA Diner near the M1. Those of you who know me, will know what a carnivore I am, and though I wasn't particularly freaked out by the Abattoir; I certainly had a funny feeling going round in the back of my mind while eating my tasty Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich. Anglo Beef Processors, (ABP) is one of the largest meat processing companies in Europe. During the mid-2000s, production was scaled back and this site and the similar but much smaller facility in Bathgate, Scotland were closed. The facility opened under ownership of Meade Buswell in the 1960s and became Buswells of Blisworth. After a takeover in the 1970s, it became Dalgety Buswell. Later on, it came under the Anglo Beef Processors umbrella before it closure in 2004. Olleco, a cooking oil collection and recycling company operate out of a directly adjacent facility and are an associated company to ABP, which makes sense really as the facility was full of discarded oil drums, catering containers and other plastic barrels. The site was a maze of walk in fridges and freezers, and it was quite easy to get lost in them while navigating your way around. Strangely, and luckily, the site was devoid largely of crappy tags, but the natives had inevitably had their way with some of the things inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 As always guys, thanks for taking the time to read. More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706479202211
  4. Thanks guys. Sorry for the volume of photos. There was quite a bit to see considering the amount of it was stripped!
  5. Thanks mate. It was nice, and pretty busy there outside!
  6. So a few weeks ago, myself and two other explorers; @albino-jay and @ Ferret whom I've known online for many years, but never managed to explore with! We all get round to exploring with one another eventually! This site was previously owned by a firm who were contracted to develop technology for the military, but was eventually sold off to a property developer after its 2011 closure. The site has recently become the Urbex Hotspot for people, so it was good to get it done and dusted before it got too much worse. We really enjoyed ourselves, and despite being fairly stripped out, there was a lot to see here. We spent around 10 hours on site I think!!! Once again, we bumped into about 4 other groups of explorers. I guess this is becoming a thing nowadays in this hobby to be honest! Just gotta face the facts that it is now mainstream... The Royal Radar Establishment; a former Research Centre in Malvern, Worcestershire in the United Kingdom was formed in 1953 as the Radar Research Establishment by the merger of the Air Ministry's Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and the British Army's Radar Research and Development Establishment (RRDE). It new name was given after a visit by Queen Elizabeth II in 1957. Both names were later abbreviated to RRE. In 1976 the Signals Research and Development Establishment (SRDE), involved in communications research, joined the RRE to form the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE). They had been closely associated since before the beginning of World War II, when the predecessor to RRDE was formed as a small group within the Air Ministry's research center in Bawdsey Manor. They were soon forced to leave Bawdsey due to its exposed location on the east coast of England. After several moves, the groups finally settled in separate locations in Malvern beginning in May 1942 with a merger in 1953 that formed the RRE and renamed these as the North Site (RRDE) and the South Site (TRE). In 1991 they were partially privatize, and became Defence Evaluation and Research Agency in 1996. The North Site was closed in 2003 and the work was consolidated at the South Site, while the former North Site was sold off for housing developments. The RSRE is now part of Qinetiq. Some of the most important technologies developed from work at RSRE are radar, thermography, liquid crystal displays and speech synthesis. Contributions to computer science made by the RSRE included ALGOL 68RS (a portable implementation of ALGOL 68, following on from ALGOL 68R developed by RRE), Coral 66, radial basis function networks, hierarchical self-organising networks (deep autoencoders), the VIPER high-integrity microprocessor, the ELLA hardware description language, and the TenDRA C/C++ compiler. The RSRE motto was Ubique Sentio, which is Latin for "I sense everywhere". The site is well explored after its sale to a Private Developer. It is well worth visiting with its mockup of a RADAR Bunker. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 #32 #33 #34 #35 #36 #37 #38 #39 #40 Thanks for Looking More at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704376480512/page1 This was a busy one, so you will have to exit via the Gift Shop I'm afraid!
  7. I have decided not to name this one; it sits in the middle of a large Brand New Housing Estate in a rather affluent part of the UK, not far from London. The reason behind this is because it looks as if its either being converted or used for storage; and tbh I don't think it needs hundreds of people going to it; its situated in the grounds of the Site Office. The Church was part of a huge Convent which I didn't even know existed; and was locally derelict for many, many years, completely unbeknownst to me! It was last used as a church when the complex closed in 2006. Visited with a Non-Explorer friend. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  8. It was a nice; atmospheric place. But it is going downhill id say
  9. I’ve always found that amusing. No idea you’re in the derp lol.
  10. Day two of @Mookster and my first Northern Explore of the year; and in true Mookster style; we get up from our cosy beds and leave the sleepy world of The Premier Inn before breakfast is even a thing in these hotels; a point that hurts me to the core as the Designated Driver, but clearly pays off once the wall of fatigue is overcome. We leave the hotel and take a drive to Bee Hive; this weekend has been a little hit and miss so far; so we have high hopes of this as it had been the Tour Bus stop off of the month; and after parking up and spending much time trying to get inside having been spotted by the sleepy street waking up numerous times; we set about a great explore. This site is very stripped out inside; but the lighting is just divine; the paintwork, features and the things that are left behind are just lovely. We both REALLY enjoyed this one; despite the bareness, it had a really nice feeling about it. - The first of the two mills on this site, was built in 1895, with the second larger mill following soon after, in 1902. The complex was constructed in a rather lovely Italianate style, with staircases disguised as campaniles along with terraced roofing and balustrades and including a very picturesque lodge/office building at the front gate. The mill span cotton up until 1967 when that venture closed. Ever since then; Bee Hive has had various other industrial uses, seemingly most recently it was occupied by a bed/furniture warehouse until they vacated some time ago. The place eventually closed down entirely in 2016 and plans to demolish this beautiful building, despite its protected status have been heavily criticized by the locals; and rightly so. Would be a tragedy. #1 [ #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 As always Guys, thank you for taking the time to look, More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157703821237512
  11. Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  12. Shot back in January; this explore formed part of a Northern Roadtrip with @Mookster. We had previously tried and failed at this place some time ago. It was nice to finally get inside this. We had several fails this weekend; but this was one of our successes. Slaithwaite had several local manufacturers in its local area; whom joined forces in 1887 to create the Globe Worsted Company; a textiles firm. They started out by building a large mill, which was typical of the era. The Globe Worsted Mills were built in two stages. The building of the first, Globe 1 began straight away in 1887 and was completed by the following year. It is thought that Glove 1 was built to a design possibly drawn up by local architect Thomas Varley of Slaithwaite. Globe 1 was 5 stories high and consisted of 33 bays. By 1889; the second phase, Globe 2 was built on the opposite side of the road; with an overhead walkway connecting the two buildings. Globe 2 was slightly different and had 5 stories plus a basement, and had 15 bays. The Globe Worsted company continued from strength to strength over the years, and like many other textile mills; it saw a gradual decline in trade towards the end of the 20th century. The company went into administration in 2004 and the mill closed later that year. The site has been sold to a private developer and a £30 million project is progress to renovate the buildings into a multi-use complex of public and business facilities. The chimney has been demolished as part of the works. Globe Mill 1 is slowly being converted into a pretty stunning looking development; hopefully this mill will follow in its footsteps. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676959136467
×