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Landie_Man

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Everything posted by Landie_Man

  1. In classic Harry style; this forms part of another explore backlog! I visited here in November 2018 with Mookster. It formed part of a little Midland Roadtrip we did that day. We all know what to expect with this place; its pretty pillaged now, access was a doddle and it was full of other explorers; something which seems to be a much more frequent occurrence these days! We met some really nice people here and had a relaxed half hour or so before moving to the next site. The Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903 and was known a local landmark in Birmingham. Tea production began here in the 30's; and survived bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. in 1968; Typhoo merged with Schweppes and with Cadbury the following year, forming Cadbury-Schweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978 as a tea making facility; but remained open as a clothes warehouse until around 2008. The grounds, which are currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park (very handy for exploring!), have been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to turn the site into a brand new university campus for the Birmingham City University. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704773968425
  2. Visited back in November with Mookster after seeing the Typhoo Factory. Another one ticked off the list which has been kicking about for years. I really enjoyed this one; though quite bare and largely sealed, it had a lot of nice things to see down there. The air was pretty bad though in places! History - Borrowed! The ‘Shadow Factory Tunnels’ are what remain of Lord Austin’s secret plans that were created to increase the force of the British military against the German military aggression in the arms race that led up to the start of the Second World War. Munitions workers produced Merlin engines to power Spitfires and Hawker Hurricanes which were used to regain control of the British skies during the 1940 Battle of Britain. The Shadow Scheme involved two stages; the building of nine new factories and the extension of existing factories. This extension included here; the Longbridge plant. Australian-born industrialist and Conservative MP, Lord Austin, whom founded Austin Motors; had already contributed to the war effort during the First World War, turning his factories to munitions and engine production. The tunnels which ran beneath Austin Rovers Longbridge plant are mostly all that is left of the plant; a large housing development increases in size upon the former footprint. These tunnels ensured that production of the engines and munitions could continue underground in relative safety. After WWII; the factory returned to producing automobiles and the tunnels were soon abandoned. By the late 60s, the plant was the second largest car plant in the world. After the collapse of MG Rover, the site saw its redevelopment. Famously; a mini was kept down here after workers damaged it in the 70s and it was hidden from bosses. The mini is now in a museum. This is a very small portion of the tunnels. Lots is bricked up #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17
  3. Absolutley awesome man. I did this in 2014. How did the huge steam loco get outside?! That was always inside. This is so well captured. Good work!
  4. Thanks mate. I did enjoy this one! Thanks Andy. Yeah this one is a nice little wander! Thanks mate. I’m glad to have gone!
  5. I had been waiting to do this one for a month or so; but simply hadn't found the time to hop on the M40 and up to Brum. It was a good opportunity to meet up with some explorers whom I have been chatting to for the best part of ten years or so and do an explore at the same time! We arrived here mid morning one Sunday and once inside; the beauty of the place was revealed! I really loved this place. Again though; it was full of the new age era of explorers; about a dozen of them, some videoing and some just shooting photos. It's rare you bump into a person on explores, but lately its been every explore. This one was flavour of the month back in the summer though!! After the explore, we went to Costco for a cheap lunch in the canteen there and had a nice, chilled drive around the local area looking for other sites The Hall, built between 1903 and 1904 by architects Ewan Harper and James Harper and the terracotta was made by Gibbs and Canning ltd of Tamworth, is situated at the northern end of Corporation Street in Birmingham. The hall is a 3 storey red brick and terracotta building with Grade II Listing on it, with 2000 seats in the main halll over 30 additional rooms including 3 school halls. By 1991, the building had been converted into a nightclub which closed in 2002, but reopened as the Q Club in 2007. This club's last event at the premises was "Flashback" in 2011. During its time as a Night Club 3 deaths were reported. -A punter jumped off the tower in 1998 -A clubber OD'd in 2000 -A stabbing outside in 2008. The Club reopened in 2012, but closed in 2016. In 2018; Birmingham city council granted planning permission to convert it into a 147 room hotel costing £35 million. Works have begun and are expected to be complete by 2020. I just love the contrast between old and new here; with the older Methodists Hall and the big, modern buildings springing up around it. There is a live part of the building and as we were there, a Gospel Band were practicing literally behind the wall; a strong scent of Jerk Chicken was filling the rooms of the abandoned part. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Thanks for Looking, more of the Hall at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674880523028
  6. Me too; Christians are nice. Perhaps we should have gate crashed! Thanks again mate; yes the ceilings here are pretty nice!
  7. So back in August (yes I'm slow as ever!); a non-explorer friend and myself visited The Springs in Wallingford, which at the time was a bit of a local tourist trap; but it was an afternoon out! It had really dawned on me at this point which way this hobby is going these days. No word of a lie; there was at least 15 people in that hotel, all this new wave of "YouTube Explorer" we all have our opinions of. They were all nice enough there and then, but a couple were very, very loud and had small children with them. Inevitably, a member of staff of the live Golf Course this was on came and flushed everyone out, myself and my friend sat in an old en-suite upstairs and waited for it to die down. After that; we explored for an hour and a half or so; not much to see here, fairly plain, but it was an enjoyable day out. Upon exit the same Golf Course Staff found us, but were polite and we were on our way. The original build dates back to 1874; a Mock Tudor Style building, this Victorian Villa has been massively altered and extended from the original. Rock Star Ian Gillan of Deep Purple, purchased the villa in 1973 and was behind its and installed a guitar shaped swimming pool in the grounds behind the building before its later conversion into a 32 bedroom hotel. The last owners bought the hotel in 1995 and added a large golf course and club to the grounds. The Springs finally closed in 2014 after the owners could no longer afford the vast upkeep. The Golf Club however; voted one of the best in Oxfordshire is still open. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 As Always Guys, Thank You. More Hotel At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674868589418
  8. Yes mate. Got caught. But we were lying low and didn’t get caught till our exit.
  9. Back in July en-route to the 28DL Bristol meet, Mookster and myself explored this disused D H L TradeTeam beer storage warehouse in Gloucestershire. The day was a mixture of fails and successes and while this one looked pretty solidly sealed from the outside, at the back there has clearly been people living inside/exiting and entering the building. There was an alarm sounding within the building; not sure how long it had been going on for; but it was pretty boring and plain, so we did some handheld photos and left. There is little info on it; but it belonged to Interbrew before the last company and has been closed since 2017. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157672156943007/with/45209179111/
  10. Thanks mate. Yeah it has some redeeming features. I like the safety deposit boxes.
  11. Thanks for the repair guys! It is a bit of a vast space. Can't imagine it will be empty long!
  12. Back in July, myself and @mookster revisited a site which we both explored back in May 2010 where we piloted my beloved 1978 Land Rover Series III to leafy Surrey. It was a roasting hot day and as an explorer of a year and a bit, it was an exciting huge factory explore which we spent hours in. Fast forward well over eight years and we decide to try a few sites around Surrey and London and head here for a revisit. A lot had happened here in eight years; all documented on crappy YouTube videos and various visits over the year, the site had been torn apart, once secured with guards, fences erected and just pillaged for its innards. I'd heard about being a muddy swamp inside in the rain; hardly suprising as it was a cat litter factory producing cat litter mined from Fullers Earth from a quarry on the same site. We arrived on site in a similarly ancient car; my 1988 Volvo 240 GLT on a much hotter day; quite a roasting day. Perfect exploring weather. The years had not been good; it was battered, beaten and stripped beyond recognition; not suprising seeing as it shut in 1994. I did not recognise this place at all. But it kind of had a charm in the summer sun, it looked like the sort of factory you'd explore on GTA Free Roam, or Driver and find Tommy Vermicelli hiding!! Good to see it again for nostalgia in any case. We spent an hour ish here before moving on to London where we ended up sitting in traffic for ages and going to a very tasty place which served bowls of meat gravy with a burger to bathe in it. Very good it was too! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157673570696148
  13. Another backlog from a West Country Road Trip back in late May with Mookster, our American explorer friend and myself. This was our second stop off on our first day on the trip; our first being Tone Mills, a revisit for me so I haven't done a report, but with Tone its always a pleasure seeing it. A wonderful site each and every time. The three of us embarked on the large two day road trip in my trusty 1988 Volvo 240 and rocked up in Torrington that morning. This site has been derelict for absolutely years, but its in the arse end of nowhere so its taken a while to see it. - Closed in 1993; Dairy Crest's Creamery sat on a site which had been a creamery since 1874. This particular Art Deco site was built in the 1930's to meet needs, but When the government de-centralised milk collection,the creamery was finally killed off and it closed its doors; a severe blow to the area; with around 200 Job losses. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157699243815344
  14. Lovely! Looks a nice place. My Mrs lives in Liverpool. Hmmmmm, maybe when I'm up there!
  15. As part of another backlog of our West Country Trip, @Mookster, our American Explorer Friend @cgrizzy and myself traveled to this rather derpy site. It's one of the list but little of interest remains inside; though its quite large, with long concrete voids with some pretty good Graffiti in places. Not much was going on inside; except some kids with a makeshift skate park in the middle who seemed slightly suprised to spot us. There is some really cool shots of nature reclaiming in here; lots growing everywhere and areas have collapsed. The Dries in Wenford were built in the early part of the 20th century (likely post-1907) to serve the local china clay pit at Stannon on Bodmin Moor. China Clay in liquid form was carried in a pipeline from the pit to the settling tanks behind the dries. The dries operated until the final closure in 2002 (aside from a brief closure during WWII). The works were originally built by the Stannon China Clay Company, but were acquired by English China Clays in 1919. The choice of site was heavily influenced by the presence of an existing railway line leading from Wenford Bridge which was originally constructed to carry granite from the nearby De Lank quarries. The dry was built adjacent to the railway line and a large private siding was built to connect to the network. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157701301733375
  16. Looking fairly sorry for itself. A good explore nonetheless. Nice one!
  17. Another season; another backlog, this shiftwork sure makes you a bit slower! I visited this site back at the end of March with Mookster and a non forum member. I have posted several reports after this one, but for some reason this one slipped the net. It was operated by Pilkington Glass up until the 1960's where sand was washed prior to the production of glass. The site is in St Helens, Merseyside and is an absolute mission to get into through mud, undergrowth and then in through a rust water filled basement. Its a wonder non f us fell into the water. I Accidentally shot these in JPEG so the editing is a bit ropey. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157698933151464
  18. A few photos from an exploring roadtrip of Essex and Kent with Mookster and our American explorer friend from back in April. Another backlog, and another one where I managed to set my camera to JPEG. DOHHH!!!! We clambered through some undergrowth and spent about 45 minutes inside. We were in one of the large corridors and heard barking. We absolutely pegged it down the corridor; I'm carrying quite a lot of extra weight so there was no chance to sneak into a side room for 10 mins. We heard the inevitable "OI!" from about 300 yards down the corridor, we'd been seen. I don't believe in running when actually caught; so we turned back and walked up to the security and explained ourselves. He asked us how we got in, marched us to the gate and let us go onto the road right by my car. result! I think our American friend was pleasantly suprised by how easy it went down. - St George's Hospital is a disused hospital situated on Suttons Lane in Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering, in North East London. It opened its doors in 1939 as "Suttons Institution" and was used during World War II to house airmen from the nearby RAF Hornchurch. In 1948 during its advent into the NHS; it was renamed St George's. The site has remained empty since 2012 and the vacant site has since been transferred into the ownership of NHS Property Services when the company was formed in April 2013. There are plans are in place for a new health centre on site, with the remaining land being converted to housing; Quelle Supríse! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693679140750
  19. Thanks mate. Yeah it’s a nice spot. Bet it would be nice and easy now without plants and weeds.
  20. Thanks all, ShAme we missed the hall and some of the other Corridors, they are bloody long!
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