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Landie_Man

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Everything posted by Landie_Man

  1. Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  2. Day two of @Mookster and my first Northern Explore of the year; and in true Mookster style; we get up from our cosy beds and leave the sleepy world of The Premier Inn before breakfast is even a thing in these hotels; a point that hurts me to the core as the Designated Driver, but clearly pays off once the wall of fatigue is overcome. We leave the hotel and take a drive to Bee Hive; this weekend has been a little hit and miss so far; so we have high hopes of this as it had been the Tour Bus stop off of the month; and after parking up and spending much time trying to get inside having been spotted by the sleepy street waking up numerous times; we set about a great explore. This site is very stripped out inside; but the lighting is just divine; the paintwork, features and the things that are left behind are just lovely. We both REALLY enjoyed this one; despite the bareness, it had a really nice feeling about it. - The first of the two mills on this site, was built in 1895, with the second larger mill following soon after, in 1902. The complex was constructed in a rather lovely Italianate style, with staircases disguised as campaniles along with terraced roofing and balustrades and including a very picturesque lodge/office building at the front gate. The mill span cotton up until 1967 when that venture closed. Ever since then; Bee Hive has had various other industrial uses, seemingly most recently it was occupied by a bed/furniture warehouse until they vacated some time ago. The place eventually closed down entirely in 2016 and plans to demolish this beautiful building, despite its protected status have been heavily criticized by the locals; and rightly so. Would be a tragedy. #1 [ #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 As always Guys, thank you for taking the time to look, More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157703821237512
  3. Shot back in January; this explore formed part of a Northern Roadtrip with @Mookster. We had previously tried and failed at this place some time ago. It was nice to finally get inside this. We had several fails this weekend; but this was one of our successes. Slaithwaite had several local manufacturers in its local area; whom joined forces in 1887 to create the Globe Worsted Company; a textiles firm. They started out by building a large mill, which was typical of the era. The Globe Worsted Mills were built in two stages. The building of the first, Globe 1 began straight away in 1887 and was completed by the following year. It is thought that Glove 1 was built to a design possibly drawn up by local architect Thomas Varley of Slaithwaite. Globe 1 was 5 stories high and consisted of 33 bays. By 1889; the second phase, Globe 2 was built on the opposite side of the road; with an overhead walkway connecting the two buildings. Globe 2 was slightly different and had 5 stories plus a basement, and had 15 bays. The Globe Worsted company continued from strength to strength over the years, and like many other textile mills; it saw a gradual decline in trade towards the end of the 20th century. The company went into administration in 2004 and the mill closed later that year. The site has been sold to a private developer and a £30 million project is progress to renovate the buildings into a multi-use complex of public and business facilities. The chimney has been demolished as part of the works. Globe Mill 1 is slowly being converted into a pretty stunning looking development; hopefully this mill will follow in its footsteps. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676959136467
  4. This one has a bit of a bittersweet ending for me really/. It's practically on my doorstep but I didn't find out about it till about 2016/17 and it closed in 2010 with much disgust from the locals! I had tried and failed it numerous times because of either filming taking place on site; or workmen. I went to check it out just before Christmas and found it to have a small demo crew inside who very kindly granted me 15 minutes in the pool area only, and they came and checked on me every 3 or 4 mins. It had been partly gutted by this point and they were so nice, I kept to my word and only left with a few photos. Hints were dropped of the quietness of the site around the Christmas Period; but I had my disabled partner, Pearl staying for a few weeks, and I had booked several weeks off work to be with her as to me, that was far more important!!! So I didn't bother returning. Still; I am also glad I didn't leave empty handed! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676566144727
  5. The end was nigh for Mookster and my North Midlands Roadtrip back before Christmas. Mookster remembered seeing this site when visiting the Crich Tramway Museum in the 1990s and had made it a goal to visit it when he discovered it had not been demolished, he previously thought it had. We parked in the Museum and walked up the driveway to the site. An older chap and some friends who frequent the site and had keys, had been feeding the birds and we exchanged some pleasantries; "As long as your not smashing anything, go for it"; was the general opinion; so we filled our boots. Sadly; much is inaccessible due to flooding; and it is overall, pretty trashed, but it had some great photo ops! I enjoyed it, and the lighting the evening was producing. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678698751578
  6. That’s very cool. It’s clearly been empty for decades. Interesting story about the hot water. The things we take for granted! That’s very cool. It’s clearly been empty for decades. Interesting story about the hot water. The things we take for granted!
  7. Another weekend, another backlog! I really need to streamline my reporting process! Part of a little day out with Mookster back before Christmas, we did this Tourist Trail steelworks; and it was a rather nice morning out; albeit a little smashed inside. The works were originally established in 1855 with an office staff of four, three small furnaces, a small foundry; plus iron fields at Stanton and in the neighbourhood parish of Dale Abbey, and the Ironstone Bell pits at Babbington. Messrs George and John Crompton; the three founders; were brothers and partners in the firm of bankers of Crompton and Evans - Mr Newton and Mr. Barber. In the infant years; the pig iron was made entirely from local ore, but in 1865 Northamptonshire ores were introduced into the mixtures; with iron mines in Leceistershire and Northamptonshire acquired and developed. In 1878 the pipe foundry, now potentially the largest in Great Britain, and possibly the world, was started under the management of Mr James Chambers. Circa 1914; the company had 7000 people on its pay roll - 3000 here at Stanton, the same number at the collieries and 1000 at the ironstone mines. In 1951 it was nationalised and became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. A takeover in 1960 by Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd happened. and was merged with Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. to form the Stanton & Staveley company. In 1967 Stanton & Staveley was incorporated into British Steel. During the early 1980s the Stanton site became part of the French Pont-a-Mouson Group and later part of Saint Gobain, manufacturing cast iron pipes. Production finally ceased on May 24th 2007, and subsequently a huge amount of the site was demolished around 2009/2010. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678405612458
  8. That's lovely mate! Good to see it shot on film too!
  9. Great to see you as always Tom; looks like you are your good old self over there and that great . It's nice to see proper decay for once; not like our soggy derps; these seem to stand the test of time much better! Hope to see you soon
  10. A rather apt explore after exploring an Iron Works earlier in the morning! After Stanton, Mookster and I headed for this little industrial Gem and met Mattdonut and James Smith inside. It was a bit of a trek through some undergrowth and tumbledown sheds full of all the old moulds and casts; but it was well worth it. The original company at this premises began manufacturing cast iron pipes back in the 1940s. By the 1980s; there was a management buy out and the company was renamed. It then closed again around two decades later and again; changed hands and was renamed; remaining in operation until it closed for the final time a few years ago. The whole site is split in two by a lovely iron railway bridge with the casting storage sheds and workshops on one side and the main foundry building on the other side of the bridge. It was a lovely treasure trove of an explore with plenty to see inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 Thanks For Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706470238285
  11. Cooor, that is lovely. I did try it a while ago and failed. I will get back here for absolute sure
  12. I want to check this one out. Its a way away though so I may need to factor it into a roadtrip
  13. In classic Harry style; this forms part of another explore backlog! I visited here in November 2018 with Mookster. It formed part of a little Midland Roadtrip we did that day. We all know what to expect with this place; its pretty pillaged now, access was a doddle and it was full of other explorers; something which seems to be a much more frequent occurrence these days! We met some really nice people here and had a relaxed half hour or so before moving to the next site. The Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903 and was known a local landmark in Birmingham. Tea production began here in the 30's; and survived bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. in 1968; Typhoo merged with Schweppes and with Cadbury the following year, forming Cadbury-Schweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978 as a tea making facility; but remained open as a clothes warehouse until around 2008. The grounds, which are currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park (very handy for exploring!), have been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to turn the site into a brand new university campus for the Birmingham City University. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704773968425
  14. I guess so! Never thought I'd hear those two in the same sentence!
  15. So here is the second site of mine and Mookies mad few days. Bearing in mind I’ve been too busy to do photo reports of late. Extensive History, borrowed from Merlin's report: History of the National Institute for Research in Dairying The need for farm land at agricultural research institutes is occasionally questioned. At the N.I.R.D. (National Institute for Research in Dairying) it wouldn’t have been impossible to carry out research on the physiology of lactation and ruminant nutrition with a few cows and relatively little land, but for a substantial system of applied research on milk production technology, large numbers of cattle at the calf, rearing and lactation stages are much needed. The 1920 move from Reading to Shinfield provided the Institute with Church Farm. This was set in 332 acres of land and included some traditional buildings which, with some fairly cheap additions; allowed the development of a Shorthorn herd of up to 60 cows. Expansion of the farming activities was soon needed. This became evident during the 1930's. In 1945 land was pretty inexpensive and was coming on the market locally. Arborfield Hall Farm was purchased in 1947 (299 acres). Although this subsequently became the home of the Bernard Weitz Centre with a new herd of 400 lactating cows. The site eventually closed in mid 1980s, and the grounds were maintained initially, which stopped by about the early 1990s. As the history of this site is quite big, here is a link to the source of the article below. http://www.arborfieldhistory.org.uk/properties_NIRD.htm The roofs of the buildings were removed in the 2000’s to prevent squatters. A pretty mundane looking explore which actually turned out very photogenic due to the sun shine. Actually quite an enjoyable, relaxed hour or two. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157642360601123/
  16. Visited back in November with Mookster after seeing the Typhoo Factory. Another one ticked off the list which has been kicking about for years. I really enjoyed this one; though quite bare and largely sealed, it had a lot of nice things to see down there. The air was pretty bad though in places! History - Borrowed! The ‘Shadow Factory Tunnels’ are what remain of Lord Austin’s secret plans that were created to increase the force of the British military against the German military aggression in the arms race that led up to the start of the Second World War. Munitions workers produced Merlin engines to power Spitfires and Hawker Hurricanes which were used to regain control of the British skies during the 1940 Battle of Britain. The Shadow Scheme involved two stages; the building of nine new factories and the extension of existing factories. This extension included here; the Longbridge plant. Australian-born industrialist and Conservative MP, Lord Austin, whom founded Austin Motors; had already contributed to the war effort during the First World War, turning his factories to munitions and engine production. The tunnels which ran beneath Austin Rovers Longbridge plant are mostly all that is left of the plant; a large housing development increases in size upon the former footprint. These tunnels ensured that production of the engines and munitions could continue underground in relative safety. After WWII; the factory returned to producing automobiles and the tunnels were soon abandoned. By the late 60s, the plant was the second largest car plant in the world. After the collapse of MG Rover, the site saw its redevelopment. Famously; a mini was kept down here after workers damaged it in the 70s and it was hidden from bosses. The mini is now in a museum. This is a very small portion of the tunnels. Lots is bricked up #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17
  17. Absolutley awesome man. I did this in 2014. How did the huge steam loco get outside?! That was always inside. This is so well captured. Good work!
  18. Thanks mate. I did enjoy this one! Thanks Andy. Yeah this one is a nice little wander! Thanks mate. I’m glad to have gone!
  19. I had been waiting to do this one for a month or so; but simply hadn't found the time to hop on the M40 and up to Brum. It was a good opportunity to meet up with some explorers whom I have been chatting to for the best part of ten years or so and do an explore at the same time! We arrived here mid morning one Sunday and once inside; the beauty of the place was revealed! I really loved this place. Again though; it was full of the new age era of explorers; about a dozen of them, some videoing and some just shooting photos. It's rare you bump into a person on explores, but lately its been every explore. This one was flavour of the month back in the summer though!! After the explore, we went to Costco for a cheap lunch in the canteen there and had a nice, chilled drive around the local area looking for other sites The Hall, built between 1903 and 1904 by architects Ewan Harper and James Harper and the terracotta was made by Gibbs and Canning ltd of Tamworth, is situated at the northern end of Corporation Street in Birmingham. The hall is a 3 storey red brick and terracotta building with Grade II Listing on it, with 2000 seats in the main halll over 30 additional rooms including 3 school halls. By 1991, the building had been converted into a nightclub which closed in 2002, but reopened as the Q Club in 2007. This club's last event at the premises was "Flashback" in 2011. During its time as a Night Club 3 deaths were reported. -A punter jumped off the tower in 1998 -A clubber OD'd in 2000 -A stabbing outside in 2008. The Club reopened in 2012, but closed in 2016. In 2018; Birmingham city council granted planning permission to convert it into a 147 room hotel costing £35 million. Works have begun and are expected to be complete by 2020. I just love the contrast between old and new here; with the older Methodists Hall and the big, modern buildings springing up around it. There is a live part of the building and as we were there, a Gospel Band were practicing literally behind the wall; a strong scent of Jerk Chicken was filling the rooms of the abandoned part. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Thanks for Looking, more of the Hall at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674880523028
  20. Me too; Christians are nice. Perhaps we should have gate crashed! Thanks again mate; yes the ceilings here are pretty nice!
  21. So back in August (yes I'm slow as ever!); a non-explorer friend and myself visited The Springs in Wallingford, which at the time was a bit of a local tourist trap; but it was an afternoon out! It had really dawned on me at this point which way this hobby is going these days. No word of a lie; there was at least 15 people in that hotel, all this new wave of "YouTube Explorer" we all have our opinions of. They were all nice enough there and then, but a couple were very, very loud and had small children with them. Inevitably, a member of staff of the live Golf Course this was on came and flushed everyone out, myself and my friend sat in an old en-suite upstairs and waited for it to die down. After that; we explored for an hour and a half or so; not much to see here, fairly plain, but it was an enjoyable day out. Upon exit the same Golf Course Staff found us, but were polite and we were on our way. The original build dates back to 1874; a Mock Tudor Style building, this Victorian Villa has been massively altered and extended from the original. Rock Star Ian Gillan of Deep Purple, purchased the villa in 1973 and was behind its and installed a guitar shaped swimming pool in the grounds behind the building before its later conversion into a 32 bedroom hotel. The last owners bought the hotel in 1995 and added a large golf course and club to the grounds. The Springs finally closed in 2014 after the owners could no longer afford the vast upkeep. The Golf Club however; voted one of the best in Oxfordshire is still open. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 As Always Guys, Thank You. More Hotel At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674868589418
  22. Yes mate. Got caught. But we were lying low and didn’t get caught till our exit.
  23. Back in July en-route to the 28DL Bristol meet, Mookster and myself explored this disused D H L TradeTeam beer storage warehouse in Gloucestershire. The day was a mixture of fails and successes and while this one looked pretty solidly sealed from the outside, at the back there has clearly been people living inside/exiting and entering the building. There was an alarm sounding within the building; not sure how long it had been going on for; but it was pretty boring and plain, so we did some handheld photos and left. There is little info on it; but it belonged to Interbrew before the last company and has been closed since 2017. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157672156943007/with/45209179111/
  24. Thanks mate. Yeah it has some redeeming features. I like the safety deposit boxes.
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