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DirtyJigsaw

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DirtyJigsaw last won the day on May 10

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About DirtyJigsaw

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  • Birthday 10/19/1983

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  1. That's a mad adventure man, cracking pics to go with it too, nice one
  2. Fantastic decay and great photos. Nice
  3. WOW, what a diiference! And The_Raw, no idea tbh what the plan is for it?
  4. Yeah, unique roof with the pyramids. Cheers
  5. Yes! That mc da was needed wasn’t it! Cheers Cheers Andy
  6. Yeah, for a "low" rooftop in london, the view was awesome Cheers mate
  7. Hello! Been abit lazy with uploading explores so heres another one from 2016. Another rooftop (when it was much easier with less Youtube Goons) Anyways, noticed the scaffold up the side of the building, so after a late shift at work i headed into London for a solo explore. Small roof but the view was awesome OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by Thanks for looking in DJ
  8. Afternoon, Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up Heres some history from googles... The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2] Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2] The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2] During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2] On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2] In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6] We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though... On to some pics Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Thanks for looking DJ
  9. All, Not sure if this should go in here as it was nearly 3 years ago now? Please feel free to move it if need be. At the time there was scaffold up at the building side as it was closed due to refurbishment. Some info from the internet: Hayward Gallery is one of the world’s leading contemporary art galleries. Since it opened in the summer of 1968 with an exhibition by Henri Matisse, Hayward Gallery has played a crucial role in presenting work by some of the world’s most significant artists. Between September 2015 and 24 January 2018, the gallery was closed for a two-year refurbishment project to restore our iconic 1960s arts venues to a world-class standard. The focus of the refurbishment project in Hayward Gallery was to restore its 66 glass pyramid rooflights in order to let controlled natural lighting into the upper galleries for the first time, transforming the experience of the hundreds of thousands of visitors we welcome every year. The stone floors of the gallery have also been replaced, the iconic sculpture terraces have been repaved and new climate control and other essential building services have been installed to ensure that Hayward Gallery can continue to present its programme of world-class exhibitions. So myself, Sweetpea and @Letchbo found ourselves climbing our way up to the top. The roof isnt that high so we were in view of passers-by and people waiting up the bus stop so had to be quick. We grabbed afew photos and watched the Southbank security milling around down below unaware us 3 were on the roof Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Cheers for looking DJ
  10. Spot on report and great photos Kat Sounds like fun by the bridge then haha, glad all went well
  11. Loving this, good work. Def visit again to find the morgue
  12. Afternoon All, Ive finally got around to putting up afew photos from my recent trip to New York, and on my second day there i visited the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital Heres some info/history, i wont post it all as on the Wiki page, there is alot of history, which you can see here if you wanna see more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellis_Island_Immigrant_Hospital The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, also known as USPHS Hospital #43, was the United States’ first public health hospital, opened in 1902 and operating as a hospital until 1930. Constructed in phases, the facility encompassed both a general hospital and a separate pavilion style contagious disease hospital. The hospital served as a detention facility for new immigrants who were deemed unfit to enter the United States after their arrival; immigrants would either be released from the hospital to go on to a new life in America or sent back to their home countries. The hospital was one of the largest public health hospitals in United States history and is still viewed today as an extraordinary endeavor in the public health field.[5] The hospital is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument. While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island has been off-limits to the general public since its closing. Efforts to restore the hospital buildings and others on the island are being made by government partner Save Ellis Island. In October 2014, the hospital opened to the public for small-group hard hat tours.[6] The original immigration station on Ellis Island opened January 1, 1892, and processed 700 people that first day. In September of that year, the Hamburg-America steamer S.S. Moravia[7] arrived at quarantine with several confirmed cases of cholera. Every ship arriving in the port of New York was held at quarantine before being cleared to land. Passengers found to have dangerous contagious diseases were taken off ships at quarantine and transferred to the hospital at either Hoffman or Swinburne Island. Twenty-four of Moravia's passengers were ill and twenty-two deaths had occurred during the voyage. Many were children. It was believed that the outbreak occurred due to the ship taking on contaminated water from the Elbe river. The threat of a pandemic caused all shipping traffic to be suspended. The backlog of ships held at quarantine and the lack of adequate medical facilities to handle the volume quickly precipitated the need for a more robust healthcare facility to treat immigrants and merchant marine sailors. Twenty years after opening, the hospital, as well as Ellis Island itself, was in decline due to tightening restrictions on immigration in the United States. In 1930, the hospital closed its doors.[10] After the hospital was closed, the FBI occupied the space as an office through the 1930s. During World War II, disabled American servicemen were sometimes housed on the islands, as well as some German and Italian prisoners of war. After the war, many war brides were detained and sometimes treated on Ellis Island. During the 1940s, the hospitals were utilized to treat Merchant Marine sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and U.S. military personnel. During the postwar period, electroconvulsive therapy was employed as a method to treat mental illnesses. This was preferred over the archaic cold water bath therapy or hydropathy, which could cause hypothermia. In 1954, the islands were officially abandoned by the Coast Guard and declared “excess federal property”. In 1996, the World Monuments Fund listed the hospital as one of the world’s 100 Most Endangered Properties, a warning echoed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which put the buildings on the list of “most endangered historical places in the United States.” A study conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy estimated that with about $3 million of federal funding, the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital could be stabilized for the next 15 years. According to the Conservancy, 15 years would allow time to develop a long-term preservation plan You would have noticed some art on the walls in the photos, this was by a French street artist JR awakens history with his ‘Unframed – Ellis Island’ Exhibition. The tour and exhibition provide an immersive visual and sensory experience loaded with historical significance. It is not to be missed! ~ Rachael Silverstein, The Culture Trip The work, which is accessible by guided tour, will remain up “until it decides to disappear.” The Unframed—Ellis Island project aims to bring alive the memory of Ellis Island, the entry point to America for millions of immigrants. Coming from all over the world, leaving their belongings, their family and their past behind them, with the fear that they may be sent back to it, the presence of these people who have shaped the modern American identity can still be felt in the buildings, although abandoned for the past 70 years. This is the opportunity to interpret the stories of these people through art. JR’s exhibit lives in the abandoned Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, on the south side of the island. Archival photographs of the hospital’s patients and staff were artistically wheat-pasted around the abandoned hospital complex of Ellis Island’s south side, creating haunting scenes that bring the history of these rooms back to life. Thanks for looking DJ
  13. All, Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too. I wont bore you any longer, but heres some history of the station stolen from Google Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris. The station was closed on 2 September 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation with a lot of traffic passing through, but was eventually closed again as a result of its proximity to the neighboring station of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis, which lies only 100 metres away. In the past, the station served to shelter homeless persons, and the eastern section of the location is currently used as a day shelter for the homeless (managed by the Salvation Army). The station closed on 2nd September 1939. Heres afew of my shots i took Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for looking. DJ
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