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Ferox

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Everything posted by Ferox

  1. Not a bad little mooch this one. Quite a lot of area to cover with most of it being stripped unfortunately but, there is still stuff to see and some nice decay in parts. It seems the building was used to make carpet underlay form 2002 until 2013. I guess its been abandoned since then. Visited with non member Paul. History The Arrol-Johnston Motor Co., which had been in operation since 1896, opened its Dumfries factory at Heathhall in July 1913. The manager, Thomas Charles Pullinger, had been inspired by the Albert Kahn designed factories of Henry Ford in America. Kahn provided the design for the Dumfries factory, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to Ford's Highland Park factory in Detroit. The Heathhall factory was said to be the most advanced light engineering factory of its day in Scotland. The site was purchased by the North British Rubber Company in 1946. It then became Uniroyal Ltd in the 60's, and in 1987 changed yet again to the British subsidiary of the Gates Rubber Company. It has been known as Interfloor since 2002. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
  2. Had a look in here earlier in the year after an fail near by. A grand example of dereliction on the outside and a crumbing mess on the inside. Nice little wander as it turned out. There is enough features and bits still knocking about to make it interesting and I enjoyed having a look around and getting some snaps. Visited with non member Paul. History The Crown opened in 1899 as the Lyceum Theatre. The intention was to provide a luxury theatre for Shakespeare productions and drama as well as revue. It is a landmark building in the town of Eccles in a vaguely Elizabethan Style with pilasters and mullioned windows. The facade is constructed of moulded red brick of five storeys with terracotta dressings to three high arched windows at first floor. It is richly decorated, and has an asymmetrically placed short corner tower. This once had a pyramidal roof and the parapet was topped with square pinnacles. The cast iron copy still survives, now encased. The auditorium was designed with three balconies, supported by four columns. The ornamentation of the proscenium comprised an allegorical representation of Shakespeare's 'Seven Ages of Man'. The act drop was a facsimile of Beverley's noted work for the opening of the Theatre Royal (Manchester) in 1845 - a Grecian subject painted by Mr Keith. Becoming a cinema in 1932, it was later adapted for Cinemascope, ending stage use. Converted for bingo in 1963, by the late 1980s it was reported to be falling into disrepair internally. The exterior is largely intact, apart from the stage house which has been partly demolished. Planning permission was given in 2005 - and again in 2008 - for partial demolition (retaining the facade) and development of apartments behind. Since then the building has become more dilapidated and a new planning application for a residential and retail development submitted in 2016 proposes complete demolition of the theatre. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157693704356862/with/42124774351/
  3. Nice work there mate. Looks like a tense one😃
  4. Awesome report that mate. Really like the misty externals and the last pic is fantastic
  5. Bloody hell. What a mad place. Cool find mate
  6. Thanks mate The lovely light on the day helped.
  7. Yep, was fucked mate. There is a handy crutch hanging in the last pic in case of any mishaps 😃
  8. Fantastic mate. Hell of a place this one. We failed here last year. I was gutted for about a month 😀
  9. Nice report mate. Looks well worth a look. Cool share
  10. Lol, Thought the same myself bud 😃 A right state now, still a few bits to have a look at though.
  11. Thanks for looking lads. Yep, worth a look if your in the area.
  12. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  13. Nice tunnel there mate. Really like the shape of it. Well shot also
  14. Thanks @hamtagger managed to get a few shots within the time frame ☺️ Sorry @Dubbed Navigator , I don't mate.
  15. Thanks all Was a nice way to spend an hour on a sunny afternoon.
  16. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  17. 2016 turned out to be the year of RAF sites for me. I visited six and failed at one other. This place was my fave. A big and spread out site with some lovely decay and lots to see. Had a relaxed few hours around here and really enjoyed it. A brilliant place, well worth a look. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY RAF West Raynham was built between 1938 and 1939 about 2 miles west of the village of West Raynham in Norfolk, seeing action for the first time on 4th July 1940. During WW2 the base was provided with a control tower for very heavy bomber stations, this was one of only four ever built. RAF Scunthorpe and RAF Great Massingham were both built as sattelite bases for West Ryanham but eventually grew to house their own squadrons. The Site was used post-war for training and in the mid-1960s the East Side was developed as a SAM (surface to air missile) site and equipped with radars and a Bristol Bloodhound Mk2. Between 1963 and 1982 RAF West Ryanham hosted annual summer training camps for the Royal Observer Corps. The camps lasted for 8 weeks and had up to 500 observers attending technical training sessions. The base was officially closed in 1994 and kept untill the Ministry of Defence decided it would be of no further use in 2004. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157671928551706/with/28669743242/
  18. Nipped in here after G.B's last February. Not much to see building wise but there is some nice graffiti knocking about. I have seen some more recent reports and the graffiti has changed in parts now. Some for the better some not. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Sheffield Tramway was an extensive tramway network serving the English city of Sheffield and its suburbs. The first tramway line, horse-drawn, opened in 1873 between Lady's Bridge and Attercliffe, subsequently extended to Brightside and Tinsley. Routes were built to Heeley, where a tram depot was built,Nether Edge and Hillsborough. In 1899, the first electric tram ran between Nether Edge and Tinsley. By 1902 all the routes were electrified. By 1910 the network covered 39 miles, by 1951 48 miles. The last trams ran between Leopold Street to Beauchief and Tinsley on 8 October 1960—three Sheffield trams were subsequently preserved at the National Tramway Museum in Crich. . . . . This one was outside Cannons Brewery on the same day. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680624533806/with/33051734346/
  19. One from earlier in the year. This had been on the list for a while and I was really happy to finally see the place. There was some graff and vandalism in evidence when we went, I believe it's even worst now. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley’s survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. . . . Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157680722816945/with/32277316163/
  20. Nice pics mate. Not seen this for a while. Thanks for the share
  21. Thanks for the comments everyone and thanks for looking
  22. Another one from early last year. A nice mix on the same site this one with the awesome old wooden part next to a burned out, vandalised, graffiti strewn new part. It brought into sharp contrast the difference between a interesting and unique explore with loads to see and photograph and a wreaked, empty and mostly uninteresting burned out shell. The feeling of enjoyment and satisfaction I got from both was definitely different. I found it an interesting experience in this mad hobby we do. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY The Old Fisons site was originally the location for the first ever complete superphosphate factory. In the mid 19th century, the increasing demand for new effective fertilisers for agriculture led to a search for a substitute for crushed bones, the traditional source of fertiliser. Edward Packard discovered that the use of fossil dung, found across East Anglia, contained high levels of phosphate, the ideal base for fertiliser. Between 1851 and 1854, Packard built a warehouse at Paper Mill Lane and pioneered the production of artificial fertilisers for horticulture on an industrial scale. It was an ideal site due to the combination of the River Gipping, which was navigable by barges between Ipswich and Stowmarket from the late 18th century onwards, and the addition of the railway line in 1846 which both provided the means to import raw materials and export fertilisers. Edward Packard was joined in 1858 by Joseph Fison who constructed his chemical works opposite the North Warehouse. The lower two floors of this iconic warehouse date from this time and were used for bagging and storage and are identified on early Ordnance Survey maps as the Eastern Union Works, proving the North Warehouse was purpose-built and directly associated with the production of superphosphates. The factory shut its doors in 2002 and has remained empty ever since. . . Thanks for Looking All the best for the New Year More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157678463886994/with/33624996416/
  23. Cheers lads There is a couple of more recent reports on 28dl that shows more vandalism and shit graff. The wooden walk way has somehow been destroyed now also.
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