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Found 96 results

  1. Easter Weekend - myself, Silverainbow, HitGirl, Rich, Harry, Greg and Kevin. The freezing temperatures, bitter wind and snow would not ruin a great day exploring Dover. These various sites have been done inside out by so many people, so I won't bore you with the history of them all, but their histories can all be easily found online. We began the day early with Z Rocket at St Margaret's, complete with it's own Labrador guard dog. It was extremely dry down here, but a good start to the day. Moving on to North Entrance, the roof vent had been cleared of crap, creating a lovely bright light down into the tunnel. HitGirl had to be talked through the spiders in the tunnels between the water tanks here, but she braved it well. It was then time to head to Hospital Postern, a staircase, where a few artistic shots were taken with tea lights and wire wool. The climb back from here was slippery, and the polystyrene-like snow didn't help! A quick break for lunch, where Harry got well acquainted with a local pensioner, before heading to South Casemates. A nice explore, despite the graffiti, with lovely lighting. It was then time for... the pipe. A long, very small chalk cave system including an 8ft long, 40cm diameter porcelain pipe, which involved knee bashing, mound climbing, dust inhaling, body squashing, cramped crawling and a lot of laughs. North Casemates had suffered a lot less vandalism and damage, so the rooms were well worth the crawl. On the way back, I got one arm stuck down by my side, with no room to move it in front of me, meaning I had to crawl through with only one arm ahead of me, shortly followed by HitGirl almost losing her trousers. Leaving Casemates, a quick group shot was taken, before finally heading to the Grand Shaft and then to the train station for the ride home. Thanks to those that made it a great day, such a good bunch of people! Only a few assorted photos of the places we visited, as I only have a point and shoot. Nonetheless, one or two okay shots. Enjoy! 1. Z Rocket 2. Lovely gates at Hospital Postern (excuse the flash) 3. Striking graffiti and rubbel at South Casemates 4. View out from South Casemates 5. North Casemates 6. Icicles at North Casemates 7. Huge concrete block backfill at North Casemates 8. View behind of HitGirl and Kevin emerging from the pipe into the chalk cave tunnels 9. View in front of the cramped tunnels (apologise again for the flash, no time to light paint) 10. Looking up at Grand Shaft 11.Lovely Dover sunset 12. Group shot
  2. Explored with Therealindianajones and one non member
  3. Explored with Therealindianajones and one non member, Called snake River Mills because it was by a river and we found a snake lol
  4. Just a few pics from here, this was a great day out.
  5. Found some more pics of pyestock from my perspective, won't go through the history as you all have heard of it, this was a great day out. I took this as I came originally from bexleyheath and erith is down the rd.
  6. I visited this place when I did the tower in another report and managed to sneak downstairs while the caretaker took a call this part of the building is abandoned and leads to the ramsgate tunnels, sadly bricked up as you will see in the photos:- Bit of history here:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Granvi ... ,_Ramsgate On with the pics, this place underground and the redundant ballroom is stunning, the fireplace is solid marble which was boarded up incase it got nicked, they were going to do this up, but not sure now what has happened to it. Lots of stain glass with different towns on they are stunning this is where the main apartments are:- This the ballroom and is gorgeous:- This mural is stunning Now underground This last pic I know where it goes and the fella came back and wouldn't let me in there
  7. Found some photos of this place after it had been restored, they had a open day and I with a mate went along, although this place isn't abandoned, just wanted to show what a stunning place this is, so hope this is ok. Bit of history:- The grange was the home of augustus pugin the victorian architect and designer who has designed alot of buildings in London and elsewhere. It was designed by him in gothic style and is grade I listed, he had it built to live out his idea of life in a medieval catholic community. Pugin bought the land at westcliffe in 1841, the house was built between 1843-1844, his 2nd wife died in 1844 and it was after his 3rd marriage in 1848 that it became a home. The interior was finally completed in 1850. Pugin died in the house in 1852 age 40, he is buried in the impressive pugin chantry in St.Augustines church next to the house which was designed by him and completed by his eldest son, who was also a architect. The house was rescued by the landmark trust in 1997 and restored. It was opened in 2006 for up to 8 temporary residents at a time and visitors by appt on wednesdays. I think now it's opened as a holiday home. Enjoy the pics, if you get the chance go for a visit it is stunning.
  8. After a mess up with directions on a saturday explore decided to go for a walk with Miss CSI on sunday and see this lovely old church, been before and love it every time I see it. Heres some history:- St.Andrew's church is a partly redundant anglican church in covehithe suffolk, it's grade I listed. Part of the church is in ruins and is under the churches conservation trust. It stands on a lane leading to the sea, which has suffered significant ongoing coastal erosion. The eldest fabric in the original large medieval church dates from the 14th century but most of it from the 15th century. During the civil war of charles 1st much of the stained glass was destroyed. By the later part of that century the large church was too expensive for the parishioners to maintain, they were given permission in 1672 to remove the roof and to build a smaller church within it. The pews were 15th Century and the pulpit is 17th century. Enjoy the pics:-
  9. Oldish report from November last year. Got caught by some contractors in here and they weren't best pleased. History: St John’s Asylum, Lincolnshire in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s It was originally built to house just 250 patients but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates where they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service The asylum finally closed its doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed and cannot be demolished. However work is now under way to convert the main buildings into flats.
  10. visited with six riff raff and pezzar ... we arrived early Friday morning ,all keen to start working are way throught the list and cram as much into three days as possible Friday didn't quite go to plan after a few fails a trye change and run in with Belgiums finest who took are details and ask us politely to leave we then heading onto traction sud could of spent all night at this place there so much to see so defintley a revisit in order on with the pics apologies for the overkill with the fish-eye got a little carried away ... traction sud ... lightspeed ... chateau luminere... theatre jusete ... Villa Wallfhart ... thanks for looking ...
  11. A solo visit to a farm/manor house. I got seen eventually and gave a tall tale to the worker from the opposite farm. Thought I got away scott free, until the local police called my house phone and asked me what I was doing. Seems like that worker took the registration plate of my car. Idiot lol. Lots left behind, a beautiful house although I couldn't get into all the rooms and it was getting very very dark. Seems like the owner was also a painter! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  12. This place is fantastic, if slightly bare, but the architecture and space makes up for it!! It was once a nursing home, then a school, then a private manor house. If converted I think it will become a nursing home once again! Loved it here. not sure if converted yet! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  13. A sunny winters day on the Jurassic Coast - drinking coffee, murdering bacon sandwiches and hunting for concrete - top day! One of our targets was Studland bay, where once upon a time the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower along with General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten congregated to witness the largest live ammunition practice of the entire war - a full-scale rehearsal for the invasion of Europe and thousands took part - they watched from Fort Henry a demonstration of carpet bombing, followed by an assault landing by troops, a truly momentous occasion. Alas, history over, here are some pictures: Fort Henry - a lookout for the likes of King George VI, Churchill, Eisenhower, General Bernard Montgomery and Acting Admiral Louis Mountbatten. Inside Dragons teeth - anti-tank defences The area of Studland bay was also heavily fortified - here is one of the gun emplacements. The bolts that mounted the gun, set within the concrete. Inside it's magazine. ... and finally, a pillbox (i won't bore you with the others) - i do wonder if this one will last another 70 years though!
  14. Visited with RJ & Shadow History can be found http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/d/draycott_cross_colliery/index2.shtml Looking deep into the tunnel, about half way down Compresser/pump of some sort...? 16 & 18 tubs, narrow gauge track in deep mud 28 tubs No road + 2 drill bits Looking up a small side air shaft Sand pilled to the roof and an earth mover Looking back towards the sand mound. metal hoops, many of which are now badly distorted. Pulley on the cable haulage system blocked adit Behind blocked off adits Looking down to the flooded adit Some of my other photo's can be viewed http://s68.beta.photobucket.com/user/Zoot337/library/Urbex/Dray Thanks for looking
  15. Ventured out again with SK and got a few feet underground as we where in the area no history on this 1 i'm afraid just had fun with it nice 1 trog will call this a mad moment And your out
  16. It's grim up North! Myself, Drinkinbud and the Beardyemukidwhotagsalong went for a mooch around this mill, we've all passed, either discounted it, it was tight or more recently full of pikeys with diggers?!?!?!!? Comedy of the day involved drinkinbud complaining that he liked southern places better, electricity, carpet, warm........he is now our honorary southern softie LOL! Anyway, here's some stolen history: "The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves." Beardygirlpants doing his thing. Drinkinbud attempting to stare at his strongbow till it magically fills up again.. Graffreflection, just had to. At the top. My big shaft shot. It's full of big rooms. And doors. And lift shafts. HI! Also has an outside. Actually, for somewhere with very little detail, this place was great, well worth a wonder round if you can! Cheers for looking.
  17. Explored with Shush and 5 others Great day with great people
  18. I visited the chocolate factory already more than four years ago. Inside it was partly very dark - much darker than it looks in the photos. The plaster had fallen from the ceiling; a gray damp mud lay on the floor and stuck stubbornly to the shoes. After the owner died, the factory was closed over 20 years ago. The widow of the manufacturer still lives in a dilapidated house next to the factory. In the past years, the condition has worsened a lot. Meanwhile, the roof of the former factory has almost completely collapsed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  19. So, after discovering a thread I convinced my camera club that Loudon would be worth a wee visit. We set off this evening to explore and take some photos. Remarkably easy to get in, despite the big gate - it was just a matter of walking around the outside of the gate and then up to driveway to the castle. That's it really - you have complete access to the site. To be honest it appears to be far from abandoned - in fact it is very well looked after. The grass is mown and everything appears to be largely undamaged. Many of the rides have been taken down and removed but there was still a fair bit to see. Well worth a visit if you are in the area.
  20. This was spread over a few visits as the first got cut short by the friendly security guard. There is no point going over the history, been done a 1000 times. So I hope you enjoy the photos. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Here are a few more recent ones 14 Switch 15 Put up your feet 16 Crossroads 17 Follow The Leafy Path To The Light
  21. This was an odd explore, from the front of the building it looked like a standard office block but the inside told a different story. First off, some fairly standard looking CNC machines - but the further in we ventured the clearer it became. There was an entire production line left in situ for making alloy wheels! Each stage of the build process had its own machining area and the wheels were transported from one area to the next on a huge conveyor system - everything from milling, shot blasting, heat treatment, lacquering and pressure testing. Many of the machines had lot numbers attached and it was my guess that it wouldn't be long before everything including an immaculate rack of machine tools were auctioned off. We gradually made our way to the front of the building, where the only notable room was a small laboratory - still half equipped. An enjoyable explore and a good end to the day. Visited with Jaff Fox and thanks to H for his info. This sign, roughly translated means: food and drink are strictly prohibited in the lacquer plant. Mr. B!
  22. Evening all, I'm sure that its OK to post in here now considering the amount of people that are doing it lately? If not, please move and accept my apologies. I'll try not to bog down the post with too many photos, as I have a lot more to go and a lot on Flickr. Lots of detail shots in with these. I decided that I needed to do this, apart from a handful in the UK, I've not done much in this country this year. After help from some fellow explorers (you know who you are) I decided that a day off work was in order and a drive from sunny South Wales to London in the early evening was on the cards. In the meantime, I arranged to meet with Dursty, a fellow member of the OS forum and community who kindly took me to B and we did the roof together. On arriving and making it to the site and negotiating my way to control room A, I spent some time in here and worked pretty quickly for me, swopping between lenses and making the most out of the early part of the explore. Once Dursty arrived, we did Control Room B and climbed up to the base of the chimneys to get that awesome skyline. Some history Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help!, appearing in the video for the 1982 hit single "Another Thing Comin´" by heavy metal band Judas Priest and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, as well as a cameo appearance in Take That's music video "The Flood." In addition, a photograph of the plant's control room was used as cover art on Hawkwind's 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm. The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004, while the redevelopment project was stalled, and the building remained derelict, the site was listed on the 2004 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund. The combination of an existing debt burden of some £750 million, the need to make a £200 million contribution to a proposed extension to the London Underground, requirements to fund conservation of the derelict power station shell and the presence of a waste transfer station and cement plant on the river frontage make a commercial development of the site a significant challenge. In December 2011, the latest plans to develop the site collapsed with the debt called in by the creditors. In February 2012, the site was placed on sale on the open property market through commercial estate agent Knight Frank. It has received interest from a variety of overseas consortia, most seeking to demolish or part-demolish the structure. Built in the early 1930s, this iconic structure, with its four distinctive chimneys, was created to meet the energy demands of the new age. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott – the man who also designed what is now Tate Modern and brought the red telephone box to London – was hired by the London Power Company to create this first of a new generation of ‘superstations’, with the building beginning to produce power for the capital in 1933. With dimensions of 160 m x 170 m, the roof of the boiler house 50 m tall, and its four 103 m tall, tapering chimneys, it is a truly massive structure. The building in fact comprised two stations – Battersea ‘A’ and Battersea ‘B’, which were conjoined when the identical B section was completed in the 1950s, and it was the world’s most thermally efficient building when it opened. But Battersea Power Station was – and is – so much more besides. Gilbert Scott lifted it from the prosaic into the sublime by incorporating lavish touches such as the building’s majestic bronze doors and impressive wrought-iron staircase leading to the art deco control room. Here, amongst the controls which are still in situ today, those in charge of London’s electricity supply could enjoy the marble-lined walls and polished parquet flooring. Down in the turbine hall below, meanwhile, the station’s giant walls of polished marble would later prompt observers to liken the building to a Greek temple devoted to energy. Over the course of its life, Battersea Power Station has been instilled in the public consciousness, not least when Pink Floyd famously adopted it for its Animals album cover and launch in 1977. As a result of its popularity, a great deal of energy has been expended in protecting this landmark. Following the decommissioning of the ‘A’ station in 1975, the whole structure was listed at Grade II in 1980 before, in 1983, the B station was also closed. Since that time, and following the listing being upgraded to a Grade II* status in 2007, Battersea Power Station has become almost as famous for plans heralding its future as for its past. Until now, that is. The transformation of Battersea Power Station – this familiar and much-loved silhouette on the London skyline – is set to arrive, along with the regeneration and revitalisation of this forgotten corner of central London. History is about to be made once more. Getting out in the early hours after a good 5 hours in here and then driving home. Glad I made it to this place to see for myself. On with some photos. A side B side External Thanks for looking in. Tim
  23. On March 19th 2011, most of the world experienced a 'Supermoon' "A supermoon is the coincidence of a full moon or a new moon with the closest approach the Moon makes to the Earth on its elliptical orbit, resulting in the largest apparent size of the moon's disk as seen from Earth" - Wiki Many of my friends from further North in the country said that on that night it was either raining or extemely cloudy but luckily for myself and King Al, the moon provided some extraordinary lighting effects and what better place than a local explore with some decent vantage points from which to photograph it. All of these shots were taken over the course of a couple of hours and required extremely long shutter speeds of up to 5 minutes, but are all straight off the camera with no tweaking other than rotation, resizing and cropping. Enjoy Fullers with a twist.... Mr. B
  24. Yes, it's another Battersea report! Well it had to be done really, I've put it off long enough, what with stories of ruthless security and a guaranteed night in the cells if you got caught, the place being like a maze if you didn't know it well, the chances of actually getting across no-mans-land unseen being slim and finding yourself in the control rooms even slimmer, it just never seemed worth it. Now with development starting, it seems security have got rather lax and Battersea has opened its doors to practically any explorer who can be bothered to climb over the fence. I'd be gutted if I never saw it, so it had to be done. See frosty's report for a more detailed write up of our evenings trip, he's pretty much nailed it. It was tons of fun, and we spent waaaay longer in there than we expected to, so much so that we had to postpone something else we were going to do that night until another day. Please Note, due to large volumes of people, it was tricky to get any shots without people in them. Also please note the gift shop is out of "I've been to battersea" car stickers such is the volume of traffic through here lately Visited with so many people I can't remember, but among them was Frosty and SirJohnnyP who deserves a shout as despite the fact he was a little worse for wear not to mention a bit lost at times, he did guide us mostly round the place and it would have been a lot harder without him. Also shouts to another member who has been more than generous with sharing information on the place, you know who you are. So without further delay I present to you "YABR" (Yet another Battersea Report) starting, as always, with control room 'A' We did a brief visit to the 'white room' a curious mock up of a hotel room in the middle of the place, quite surreal. I didn't bother with any pics, but we chilled there for about half hour, had a fag and watched and episode of danger mouse on youtube. Then control room 'B' this wasn't as big as I expected it to be, but it's still impressive none the less. Yeah it HAD to be done, I know it's not original but I don't care. And after that and much farting around getting back down, we decided the night wouldn't be complete without climbing up to the base of at least one of the stacks, so we picked the North tower of 'A' side and went for it. Unfortunitely it was very windy and spitting with rain so I didn't really get any good pics, I wasn't really that bothered, I just wanted to get up close to one of the famous white chimneys. And that was that, mission accomplished. It's only taken me 6 years to get round to it. Now, anyone else thinking of going just go get it done, it IS worth it despite the millions of reports, you'll regret it if you don't make the effort! Thanks for looking Maniac.
  25. Well here we go, I’ve wanted to crack this for a few years but never got round to it, and once again Northern_Ninja came to my aid. So to help my continuing depression and sadness, I decided a trip here was on the cards. We planned to go the following evening, but with meal plans disrupted we decided to make it into a last minute road trip. I arrived at the Ninjas HQ at about 7:30pm and off to London we went in my small run around Punto armed with a stove, frying pan and sleeping bags. After a short drive we were finally there. We did the run across no mans land, through all the mud and crap and straight into A-side. For me; it did not disappoint. So many photographic wonders right in the centre of London. We spent a good few hours inside A-side before heading for the roof and getting some shots of the chimneys (it would be rude not to!), where I kindly received some help taking night time shots. After that we went straight up the scaffold on one of the chimneys. It was wet, cold, and quite scary, but totally wonderful at the top. I went about shooting my pictures of London and Battersea from the base of a chimney, which I shamelessly hugged for about 30 seconds. For me, Battersea was a bit of a milestone! After this, we headed down back into A-side and made the quick dash to B-side, where we spent the best part of an hour. It wasn’t as good in here, but still amazing nonetheless. Remember, here it is about the history of the place, and the purpose it served. From here, we went across onto the pier and checked out the cranes. The pigeons inside the internal ladder behind the operators cab thwarted our progress, but we admired the views from halfway up nonetheless. After Battersea we enjoyed sausage and bacon baps, cooked by Northern_Ninja under a railway bridge at 2:30am. We drove through Central London to West Silvertown where we slept uncomfortably in the back of the car, with only the view of Millennium Mills to keep us company. Busted within five minutes sadly in MM, but a good night before made up for that. P.S. I am a big Pink Floyd fan! Taken from SirJonnyPs report, probably harvested off Wiki! First of all, sorry about the amount of piccies!
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