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Found 96 results

  1. Hello, I have had this on my list for a long time and after a few messages we arranged a meet. Access was piss easy and we didn't see anyone or security. got lost loads of times inside and found the famous white room show flat but couldn't find access to the other control room. A revisit is on the cards i think. On our exit we found our original entry point had been sealed! Must be a magician Secca! Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London. On 7 June 2012 it was sold to SP Setia and Sime Darby. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 is due to commence in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17.
  2. Lier Mental Hospital, Norway Built 1921, 5 buildings closed 1985 the Interior was removed 2010. Demolition started Autumn 2013 and the Photos from july 2013, from just one of the buildings. The Hospital area still has several buildings in full use. r I think I finally got it now. You can see the photos, right? Hope you like them
  3. I wasn't going to bother putting up a report anywhere on this, as we got caught by the farmer and he's pretty fed up with people going onto his land to photograph it, he actually asked us not to post the images on the net anywhere. To be fair I can understand as it must be quite exasperating for him to keep telling trespassers to bugger off, and he is after all only going about his business. So not wanting to encourage too many visits, I'll stick it in private so it doesn't really count. If anyone does go seeking this out, don't park outside the gate with the big 'private land keep off' sign. School boy error, it's pretty obvious why you're there. Go park a distance away and walk to it. The history is borrowed from another report on another forum, as there's really not much info out there about it. Colin Stokes was a local eccentric artist who began building a barn for his sheep in the 1980s. It started out as a single storey shed, but within a decade it had spread upwards and outwards into a hocus-pocus tangle of towers, turrets and arches. It was originally small enough not to need planning permission, but the council eventually told him he had to stop. However by this point he had hidden it from them for ten years, and it had grown so massive it's basically as large as a house. This was in the 1990s. Colin moved to Scotland soon after, and since then, the "shed" (if you can call it that, it's certainly the best shed I've ever seen!) has been left empty and open to all weathers. But it's remote location, and the fact that Colin put a lot of effort into making sure it was built to last means it is unusually intact. It really is an intriguing little place. I only got a couple of quite poor exteriors as I was meaning to take some more on the way back, but of course we got seen before that happened. This one has a Frosty in it for scale. As you can see, this part is approximately 1 1/2 frosty's high. And some of the stained glass is beautiful. It's amazing that this survives in the middle of the countryside like this, was very surreal. Thanks for looking, Mike.
  4. Was a little disappointed in this, but when I saw the chapel my opinion changed.
  5. Christmas has been a bit quiet for me splore wise and I was clucking for a couple of hours out. So it was a quick visit to a couple of local splores __________________________________ POW CAMP 116 - MILL LANE - HATFIELD HEATH Prisoner of War Camp 116 was set up in 1941 to house Italian prisoners of war, and from 1943-1944 it mainly held German and Austrian prisoners. The POW's were allowed out to work on the nearby farms and one local has this memory of it...... "The Austrian and German prisoners of war were kept in a camp at Hatfield Heath and sent out daily to 'help on the land'. Our first batch were Austrian and they were hard workers and Mum was so sorry for them she looked at their ration for the day and promptly invited them to share our food - they even ate with us. The next lot were German and all but one of those were also polite, hard workers and they too shared our food and ate in the kitchen with us. My biggest impression was the way they stood whenever Mum got up and would never sit until she too sat down. Dad corresponded for some time with one of them, a Walter Scheile from Beilefeld in Germany." The English Heritage Document entitled "PRISONER OF WAR CAMPS (1939 – 1948)" has this to say about it Camp 116 (Mill Lane Camp, Hatfield Heath) conforms to the so-called ‘Standard’ layout, with the guards’ compound consisting of MoWP huts, while the living huts are all timber Laing huts.
  6. Sheffield General Cemetery I was in Sheffield and my friend wanted to show me this cemetery so we went and had a look and i must say i really enjoyed walking around even got inside the chapel bonus . I like the history of this place too and enjoyed doing the research here is a few photos i took and some history i got on it. the first pic isnt mine. The General Cemetery was one of the first commercial landscape cemeteries in Britain. Its opening in 1836 as a Nonconformist cemetery was a response to the rapid growth of Sheffield and the relatively poor state of the town's churchyards. The cemetery, with its Greek Doric and Egyptian style buildings, was designed by Sheffield architect Samuel Worth (1779–1870) on the site of a former quarry.[4] Landscaping was managed by Robert Marnock, who also designed Sheffield Botanical Gardens (1836) and Weston Park (1873). The first burial was of Mary Ann Fish, a victim of tuberculosis. An Anglican cemetery was consecrated alongside the Nonconformist cemetery in 1846â€â€the wall that divided the un-consecrated and consecrated ground can still be seen today. By 1916 the cemetery was rapidly filling up and running out of space, burials in family plots continued through the 1950s and 1960s, but by 1978 ownership of the cemetery had passed to Sheffield City Council and it was closed to all new burials. In 1980 the council got permission by Act of Parliament to clear 800 gravestones to make a recreation area. Through the 1980s and 1990s most of the rest of the cemetery was left untouched, becoming overgrown and an important sanctuary for local wildlife. Unfortunately, many of the buildings also fell into disrepair. In early 2003 work began to restore the gatehouse and catacombs funded by a £500,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund The Gatehouse (Grade II listed) is built directly over Porter Brook in classical architecture with Egyptian features. The gateway resembles a Roman arch. It was possibly built over the river so that entering the cemetery was symbolic of the crossing of the river Styx in Greek mythology. The Egyptian Gate (Grade II listed) is the entrance to the cemetery on Cemetery Road. It is richly ornamented and possesses a sculpted gate bearing two coiled snakes holding their tails in their mouths. The Nonconformist chapel (Grade II listed) is built in classical style with Egyptian features. The sculpted panel above the door shows a dove, representing the Holy Ghost or the Holy Spirit. Stone steps lead down to a wall with catacomb-like entrances. The Anglican chapel (added in 1850; Grade II listed). Designed in the Neo-Gothic style by William Flockton. Unlike the other buildings in the cemetery, the chapel was built in Gothic style rather than Classical or Egyptian. The building is distinctive in style due to its ogival windows, the porte-cochere and the spire. The spire is indeed far too big for the rest of the building, built purposely so that it would be seen from afar. The Registrar's house (Grade II listed) The Catacombs. There are two rows of catacombs built into the hillside, this method of burial was unpopular and only ten bodies were laid to rest in the catacombs in the first 10 years. The Dissenters' Wall was built between 1848 and 1850. It divided the older Nonconformist part of the cemetery from the consecrated Anglican ground. The wall runs almost uninterrupted, from the perimeter wall on Cemetery Road to the path beside the Porter Brook at the bottom of the cemetery. George Bassett (1818–1886). Founder of The Bassett Companyâ€â€the company that invented Liquorice Allsorts. Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1876). George Bennett (died 1841). Founder of the Sheffield Sunday School movement. The memorial to him (c.1850) is Grade II listed.[11] John, Thomas, and Skelton Cole. Founders of Sheffield's Cole Brothers department store in 1847â€â€now part of the John Lewis Partnership. Francis Dickinson (1830–1898). One of the soldiers who fought in the Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean war. William Dronfield (1824–1891). Founder of the United Kingdom Alliance of Organised Trades, which inspired the creation of the Trades Union Congress. Mark Firth (25 April 1819–28 November 1880). Steel manufacturer, Master Cutler (1867), Lord Mayor of Sheffield (1874), and founder of Firth College in 1870 (later University of Sheffield). The monument to Mark Firth is Grade II listed,[12] the railings that surround it were made at Firth's Norfolk Works. William Flockton, architect. John Fowler. Father of the designer of the Forth Rail Bridge (also called John). John Gunson (1809–1886). Chief engineer of the Sheffield Water Company at the time of the collapse of Dale Dyke Dam on 11 March 1864, which resulted in the Great Sheffield Flood. Samuel Harrison, who documented the flood, and 77 of the flood's victims are also buried in the cemetery. Samuel Holberry (1816–1842). A leading figure in the Chartist movement. Isaac Ironside (1808–1870). Chartist and local politician. James Montgomery (1771–1854). Poet/Publisher. The grave and Grade II listed monument to James Montgomery, were moved to the grounds of Sheffield Cathedral in 1971.[13] James Nicholson (died 1909). Prominent Sheffield industrialist. The memorial that he commissioned for himself and his family c.1872 is Grade II listed.[14] William Parker, merchant. The monument to William Parker, erected in 1837 by the merchants and manufacturers of Sheffield, is Grade II listed.[15] William Prest (died 1885). Cricketer and footballer born in York, who lived most of his life in Sheffield. Co-founder of Sheffield Football club These are the crypts. aparantly theres been satanic rituals done inside here and night time atracts many um disturbed people. the chapel has been arsoned before (SO annoying drives me crazy!) still a cool explore for me had fun.
  7. Never leave without bobbys splore food...cheers tink I even got there early to show willing....... JUST SEND HER DOWN!!!!
  8. Right people, it's back to school for you lot! luckily for the guy's it's a girls school!! The school was designed by J. M. Bottomley and G. T. Wellburn of Leeds and built in 1910. It was built in an Edwardian Baroque style, in an English cross bond utilising red brick and with white faience dressings. In 1971 the school amalgamated with Doncaster Grammar School and was renamed Hall Cross Comprehensive. The building here is the Waterdale location.
  9. Thankful there was enough remaining to grab some shots and at the same time have a good giggle Splored With Lara,Trog and peaches In the back area of the stage Lara found some costumes and the silliness began. Beds began to roll up and down the corridors . Better not to ask I nearly ran straight into secca. At first i thought it was another fool dressed up but as Sindbad Then realized he was a Sihk Secca lol This fella was either as deaf as a post or turned a blind eye & I wasnt fussed with either. As was more to see and we put a bit of distance between us and the now named Turbanator. Cheers for looking in
  10. Another one of those Ive been meaning to do for ages, Its normally one of those that people do early on in their explore career but I didnt for some reason, the time never felt right , Visited With Ms Penfold, A little history can be found via this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dover_Western_HeightsAnd so for a few PicsThanks for taking the time to look
  11. Hi All As much as we all hate to see our beloved shrines of dereliction, they all eventually either get ripped down or converted A lot of these are good, and a lot of them are very, very bad What are the best ones you have seen? My favourite has to be Nethernene on the hill. Located just down the road from cane hill Its a beauty Hall Admin Water tower
  12. I nipped over last night to check the fire damage. The only building that was on fire is the St Mary's building (which was a nurses home not a care home as I have written in this report). It has suffered damage to the right hand side of the building but is not totally burned out. There is a planning application submitted to demolish most of the buildings on the site including St Edwards. As far as I could see there has been no descision made on it yet. http://planning.northwarks.gov.uk/portal/servlets/AttachmentShowServlet?ImageName=253942 I also found this on the net (link below), it gives the whole history and a detailed report on all the buildings. There is still some unseen stuff here notably the chapel within the former St Gerards Hospital which is now offices. If demo goes ahead I'm sure it will become more accesible. It will be a shame to see these buildings go as it's a great urbex site imo.
  13. ive been rather intrigued by this littleone for a long time..ide wander past several times last summer and have a little peek but could never really figure the place out...was some one living in it or not?? A closer peep a few weeks ago had me spinning on my head ( well you know what i mean ) Time to grab my besty PS and pay her a little more closer attention...we decided on the time and the was no stopping us...snow up to the top of my wellies my road blocked and it was truley perishing out... but the was no keepin PS in... i heard the familiar PEEP PEEP " get up T**T its splore time.. grin from ear to ear " and a barage of bashes on my door..it was four am and im pearing out the door at knee high snow hmmmm:) "Lets go!"!! Whoop! so here she is..... The seamstress's Cottage.... Over to PS now.....
  14. I'm sure you all know this place first hand, it was a very popular place and it's had a lot of Urbex traffic pass through it. Visited with Rusty on a Sheffield day trip back in September 2011 A real cool old place, I'm not sure of it's current status.
  15. Well guys, this has been covered on more than one occasion, and I've visited this site on more than one of the numerous open days over previous years never been lucky enough to get any Pics due to the hoards of people all over the place, So when one very kind Barry Stewart offered me free reign of the place for a few hours obviously I happily and very gratefully took him up on his offer. So, For a bit of History ; The Drop Redoubt is one of the two forts on Western Heights, and is linked to the other, the Citadel, by a series of dry moats (the lines). It is, arguably, the most impressive and immediately noticeable feature on Dover’s Western Heights. The artillery at the Redoubt faced mostly inland; it was intended to attack an invading force attempting to capture Dover from the rear. The construction of the Redoubt was in two periods: the first being from 1804-1808 during the Napoleonic Wars, and the second from 1859-1864 following the recommendations of the 1859 Royal Commission. Well, That's all folks, Thanks for taking a look More can be found out about this fantastic Structure Here;
  16. Sadly this place is no more. One of my first explores last year, it may please some of you to see non processed images from myself too Here is abit of history from Geograph: The Norfolk Lunatic Asylum was situated in Yarmouth Road, Thorpe St Andrew near Norwich. The architects were Francis Stone and John Brown (Norfolk County Surveyors) and Robinson Cornish and Gaymer of North Walsham. The County Asylum was intended specifically for pauper lunatics and was only the second institution of its kind when completed in early 1814. The buildings were originally designed for the reception of 40 male patients in April 1814, followed by female patients in June of the same year. Roughly 70 patients were present on average in the early years. Extensions in 1831 and 1840 allowed this number to double and more substantial additions in the late 1850s as well as the construction of an auxiliary asylum, which was completed in 1881, some 700 inpatients could be accommodated. The auxiliary asylum or annexe is situated to the north of the main buildings, on the other side of Yarmouth Road, connected by a lane that was carried over the main road by a bridge. In April 1889 the institution was re-titled the Norfolk County Asylum, and after its modernisation into 'a hospital for mental disorders' (with reorganisation into distinct male and female asylums) there was room for more than 1,000 patients. To read it all look here: http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2255369 Sorry no tripod So a few flash shots have been used! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Hope you enjoyed thanks for having a look.
  17. Having just recovered from one fever and been laid up for a while The splore fever was now running high & needed to get out bad. I set off with Lara and after negotiating a few obstacles we started working our way through the woods of a very large site. The whole area is dotted with over grown structures some dating back to Napoleonic times. It was Original used for the development & manufacture of explosives and then the development of missiles,Rockets and other propelled objects. We ended up giggling like kids hiding behind trees to avoid the men driving around in Land Rovers to get to where we wanted to be. The old laboratories & store area. Splore on Cheers for sneaking a peak
  18. West Park was a nice site, but every man and his dog knew about it and the same shots used to get taken time and again. Reaperman (of http://abandoned-britain.com/ ) and I decided to do a night visit at a time when the place was extremely popular, and use it more as an experimenting ground for natural and artificially lit shots. Our aim wasn't to cover much ground, but to take shots until they came out right! It was a good experience and co-ordinating the lighting was good fun. Simply lit with torches and 2 coloured gels. Mr. B
  19. A revisit was in order with Obscurity,Fortknox0 and frosty and this time Space Invader joined us for a look around This is looking back along the Arp (tower hamlets tunnel) just before lagoon caves Section leading to the tower hamlets tunnel from the lagoon caves Now a few from in lagoon caves Toilet block at the end of the caves Back into the main tunnel looking towards the bricked wall just before the builders rubbish blockage Another toilet block in beaufoy’s caves Looking down just after the long crawl over broken shower doors and rotten wood Now sealed passage into the workshop area beyond this was obviously still in use That was that nice to visit the place again!!
  20. Came across this field of cars after a day of failed splores, i was chuffed to bits. There is a history behind it but I cant go into to much detail, but by the sounds of it, it was an obsession that ended a marriage. It was a great mooch, loads and loads of cars, some older than others and none of them would ever pass a MOT again. But for me seeing Stasky and Hutch on the bus, made me a little bit happy!! Splored with Miss.Anthrope Thanks for looking x
  21. Another one from our trip down South. More goodness revealed by SK! Here's some history. In 1864, Fr Herbert Vaughan, the later Cardinal Vaughan, gained approval to build a missionary seminary in England. On the 28th February 1871, after considerable difficulties had been overcome, the new seminary in Mill Hill, London, was built and occupied under the patrimony of St Joseph. Fr Vaughan's outstanding trust in St Joseph was thus rewarded. Mindful of St Joseph's finding of the stable for Mary when no other roof was to be found, Vaughan, on his first approach to the landowners of the new seminary, carried with him in a parcel a little statuette of St Joseph. When the landowner showed him the door after refusing Fr Vaughan's negotiations, Vaughan asked if he might leave the parcel in the house saying that he had some other business to attend to and he would collect it later in the day. When he returned, the landowner, Mr Druce, had changed his mind and the land was for sale. In 1871, this same statuette was solemnly installed in the simple little cloister of the seminary bearing the inscriptionOeconomus Domus Nostrae (Provider of our Home). The laying of the foundation stone of the seminary was a very public occasion on the 19th March 1871, the Feast of St Joseph, with the ceremony performed by Archbishop Manning. All that was required now was the funding to actually build and finish the church! The Holy Father had agreed that the Church would be the home of England's national shrine to St Joseph and fittingly, on the feast of St Joseph in 1873, the church was officially opened. The debts were finally paid off in March 1874, and the church was consecrated. By a special indult of Pope Pius IX, Cardinal Manning was permitted to crown the statue of St Joseph, which, with its altar, was declared the national shrine of Saint Joseph for England & Wales. This ceremony was performed in the presence of the hierarchy of England and Wales on 13th April 1874, and the statue became one of only a handful of crowned statues of St Joseph in the world. The once thriving English and European seminary of St Josephs in Mill Hill, has now given way to the reality that most of the Missionary Vocations are coming from Africa, only a few from England. The number of vocations from Africa is testimony to the great work and witness of the Mill Hill Missionary Fathers and the seminary of St Josephs. The Mill Hill site of St Joseph's closed on 1st July 2006. The new seminary of the Mill Hill fathers will be built where their vocations are strongest - in Africa. A big question mark hung over the shrine of St Joseph. The Mill Hill Fathers, eager to preserve their patrimony and to continue to foster devotion to the Patron not only of their order but also of the Church and of families, entrusted the shrine to the Benedictine monks of Farnborough. The shrine was transferred early in 2008 to the south transept of the Abbey Church where it continues to be a focus of devotion. Mint corridoors. And corners Chapel, used as a film set so repainted in places. Sun playing ball. Looking like I'm from an 80's electro band.....(Thanks SK) View from the top. Frontage. Rear view. Mint day all round!
  22. This is a sad little house with a sad history of loneliness and death in a fire, it is of no great size but contains the remnants of a life and is now gradually being overgrown by nature with an unclear future.
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