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Found 268 results

  1. Hi everyone! I'm looking for people to visit locations together, somewhere in Belgium, NL, Luxembourg, France, or nearby) I'm rather experienced with urbex, but I don't really like doing it alone and it's hard to find people who also understand what they're doing at locations. I'm mostly interested in metro/underground stuff and roofs. Soon I'm planning to search for some roofs in Brussels and Amsterdam, and check out local metro. If you'd like to join me - let me know!
  2. Explored alone the forbidden catacombs of París, the most amazing experience that I have lived as an urban explorer, I will repeat soon:
  3. We didn't really know what to expect with this one, only found on Google Earth, few recent informations... But life can also be surprising, and this time, it was good ! 😄 Built during the 13th century and redesign during the 14th and the 18th, it was finally bought by a famous author in the mid 50's. Well known to be a writing haven for the writer, the castle is also known to have hosted some memorable parties with memorable people : Authors, journalists even politics... The Castle was sold a few years the death of his owner to a businessman who wanted to create a place dedicated solely to Art But nothing happened since then... The castle now stand, almost empty, in the middle of nowhere, waiting for a new life.
  4. Somewhere in a small french village is these castle located. Lot of rooms wich a fully furnished and a lot of other stuff are in the rooms. There are also more then 100 books.
  5. I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
  6. We went to this really impressed location. The security there is very high and some people said it is impossible to get in. We made it without any problems.
  7. All, Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too. I wont bore you any longer, but heres some history of the station stolen from Google Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris. The station was closed on 2 September 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation with a lot of traffic passing through, but was eventually closed again as a result of its proximity to the neighboring station of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis, which lies only 100 metres away. In the past, the station served to shelter homeless persons, and the eastern section of the location is currently used as a day shelter for the homeless (managed by the Salvation Army). The station closed on 2nd September 1939. Heres afew of my shots i took Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for looking. DJ
  8. The secrets of the legendary catacombs of Paris, a tunnel system that spans more than 280km in length. The catacombs in Paris hold remains of more than six million people. They are part of a tunnel network that runs below Paris that is more than 280 kilometers long. No one knows how far the tunnels extend in total, as there are still many paths that are unmapped and even undiscovered. The main reason behind the tunnels was to extract Lutetian limestone for use as a building material. For instance, parts of the Louvre, the Place de la Concorde and Les Invalides were built with limestone from this tunnel system. The catacombs only take up about 2.1km of the tunnel system and they are the only part that is legally accessible. Even though that is the case, many people refer to the surrounding tunnel network when speaking about the "Catacombs of Paris". The ossuary was created in the late 1700s to tackle the problem of overflowing cemeteries and until the early 19th century, the ossuary was largely forgotten until it became a novelty place for concerts and other private events. The network is mostly intact today and is regularily toured by urban explorers or so called "Cataphiles". If anyone is curious about the way we took, the names of the rooms we went into and a bit of a sidestory, here's the full post (warning: It's damn long and I feel it would overcrowd the forums) Also, even though I posted a lot of photos, these are not all, so feel free to check out the rest of them if anyone has gotten curious. LINK: http://inwordsandpictures.net/catacombs FULL-ALBUM: https://flic.kr/s/aHskDMEvnC INSTAGRAM: ofcdnb DSC_9230 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9239 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9241 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9245 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9250 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9254 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9257 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9265_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9276 by anthrax, auf Flickr SC_9279 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9281 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9283_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9290_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9311 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9338 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9343_2 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9346_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  9. An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  10. It was a very long trip on this day - 23.5 hours on the road, 1480 km driven... But it was worth it. In the afternoon we reached our third place, this old house on the outskirts of a small village. From the outside it was already pretty overgrown. Nevertheless, access wasn't difficult. Inside were old furniture, various dolls, a piano, and everything surrounded by beautiful decay. Only the smell of a decaying fox in the entrance area wasn't really pleasant... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  11. This was our first Metz German Fortification of the day and it did not disappoint. GF L'Yser is filled with murals and paintings, which are incredible and fortunately survive after nearly 100 years. Visited with @flat and a few other non-members History: The Feste Prinz Regent Luitpold, renamed Group Fortification Yser after 1919, is a military installation near Metz that was constructed between 1907 and 1914. It is part of the second fortified belt of forts of Metz and formed part of a wider program of fortifications called "Moselstellung", encompassing fortresses scattered between Thionville and Metz in the valley Moselle. The aim of Germany was to protect against a French attack to take back Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle from the German Empire. The fortification system was designed to accommodate the growing advances in artillery since the end of XIXth century. Based on new defensive concepts, such as dispersal and concealment, the fortified group was to be, in case of attack, an impassable barrier for French forces. During The Annexation of Alsace-Lorraine, the fort receives a garrison of gunners belonging to the XVIth Army Corps. From 1914-1918, it served as a relay for the German soldiers at the front post. Its equipment and weapons are then at the forefront of military technology. In 1919, the fort was occupied by the French army. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army reinvests the fort. In early September 1944, at the beginning of the Battle of Metz, the German command integrates the fort into the defensive system set up around Metz. Must go back Outer fighting block: DDE_5447 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5457 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5459 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5462 copy by Nick, on Flickr Turreted by Nick, on Flickr Main block DDE_5494 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5507 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5511 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5528 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5533 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5543 copy by Nick, on Flickr The Murals DDE_5563 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5506 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5586 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5503 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5588 copy by Nick, on Flickr DDE_5587 copy by Nick, on Flickr
  12. Chateau Sarco – France Built in the 19th century. Once owned by the ministry and sold in 2008 for just under 4 Million euro and abandoned ever since……
  13. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  14. The place, called "little Lutece", the ancient name of Paris, was a holiday park with an Asian restaurant, a villa and other buildings. Unfortunately, I don't know when it was built, opened or closed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  15. An oil refinery being decommissioned... I went there with my bicycle, managed to get it past the first fence which was nice xD I hope i didn't put too many photos... D90 with sigma 17-70 cheers
  16. Evening all, hope we are all having a lovely juan. right it's been a week since RAWs went up and its been a couple o' few weeks since my last report so thought i'd fire something up from weekend before last weekends 36 hour hop into france. pretty banging 36 hours really, got round a prison, a chateau and then went to an awesome party, more than most normal people get done in 36 hours anyway History. -right i just spent about 20mins digging through old reports trying to find some half decent history on the place which i could steal but cant see much about, all i found is that the place closed in 2011 and housed around 1500 inmates. As you will see the place is well buggered now, absolutely trashed and covered head to toe in graff, that said i cant speak for the womens side as we didn't get in there. The explore. Explored with Maniac, the_raw and elliot5200. Twas an early start on the morn of our departure and after good floor kipping session at the behest of mr manics hospitality we were well on our way to the tunnel. Landed in the general area of the prison around 11 and after picking up some lunch supplies and wandering around a car park looking for a bog for 20 mins we headed off towards the prison, as most will know there's a lovely little group of romany gypsys planted in the car park of the prison, heard stories of explorers getting corned in cells by them and shit so were a little bit on the ball, kept a a keen eye on the carpark as we scooted around to the access the place is pretty much wheelchair friendly now which made life easy but will have also lended to the reasons the place is so buggered. Once inside the main building we all kind of wandered off and got our shots, nothing particularly exciting went down, bumped into a few french explorers, had lunch at the centre of were the wings meet up, i got a boner when i found a puddle and that was about it. As trashed as it is i really enjoyed our few hour mooch in here, something a bit different, definitely would have been nice to get in the womens section but we were in a bit of a rush as we wanted to tick off a chateau before heading to our party destination. So yeah that was about it, no medieval style clashes with pikeys, no seccas chases, no horrific accidents-no ghosts, just a nice little mooch around an empty prison taking photos, smoking fags and eating chess n ham namwiches could have spent longer here i reckon, we saw a ladder for the roof but needed to get on the road to our next destination so skipped that, i'd defo go again if i was in the area. As for the infamous H15 carpark gypsies, i honestly think they are so used to people going in there the couldnt give a flying funk any more. Explorers and graffers have been going in for a few years now, we saw 2 possibly 3 other groups of french explorers in there as well as us- and that was just in the space of 2/3 hours. I hadn't seen a report for a while but this place obviously still major tour bus, just think the gypos are past caring who's snooping about, i blatantly got spotted up a watch tower by one of them and he didn't bat an eye. right then, on with a load of very similar pics of cell blocks with loads of infinity lines and wonky symmetry : P my sensor is pissed in my camera so horizontal parallel lines taper one side-AND ITS CLUCKIN WELL ANNOYING!! Graff on the way in Portrait with bogs in nets Cell internal w/ BOG Top floor landing Cell internal graff face Cage to wings from central hub Ground shot with naturally back lit netting wide hallway with holding cells Holding cell Stairway to landing Peeley paint radiator S**t house Ariel dick Cells from landing cell internal Cell door awesome landing Stairs one for the reflection selection Thanks for looking kids, take it sleazy
  17. La Morgue Prelude is situated on a massive hospital site. The hospital originally opened in the 1860’s, the hospital itself is still in use today but large parts of it is unused and getting renovated.
  18. The once grand Bureau Central administration building now stands decayed and rotting, but still retains nearly all of it's character. History The Bureau Central was the main offices for the de Wendel Family Metal company. The Family had been involved in metal industry since the 18th Century. By the 19th Century they were the 3rd largest iron company in Franc. In 1870 they became the largest iron company after a major furnace upgrade successfully modernised their production. During this period they employed 7000 people and were producing 112,500 tonnes of iron and 134,500 tonnes of pig iron each year. When they expanding to steelmaking, they needed a grand main office to impress customers and keep on top of their every growing enterprise, and so in 1892 Central Bureau was built. In 1926 the Bureau Central was expanded to cope with the still growing paperwork. The de Wendal iron enteprise continued to flourish until the post WW2 period where business fell into a decline. The mining industry was nationalised and eventually the whole family company was completely nationalised. Bureau Central was abandoned in the 1980's after a company merger. The building itself is listed and protected. The Explore The first attempt at Bureau Central was a bit of a fail as there was a worker cutting trees right behind the building, exactly where I needed to be. So I went off to explore a plan B (Terre Rouge) and returned a few days later on a Saturday morning when it was much quieter, and I got in with no drama this time. The building is very decayed and has been well trashed. Looking at older photos it seems its been in a bad state of decay for a number of years, and not much has changed recently. It's got 4 levels including a huge basement level. The building is pretty big, with lots of rooms, but most of them are empty and layered in collapsed ceiling material. However the grandeur, architecture and nice lighting makes it the most photogenic explore I've done for a while. The long corridors, skylights and peeling paint tick all the boxes of a good decay photo. I was there alone for a couple hours until 5 German Explorers showed up to explore it too. Turned out to be a really decent bunch too. A cracker of an explore! Photos
  19. A former powerplant that ran on gas from blast furnaces, now being demolished. ----
  20. This old chapel in the middle of the forest was the first stop during my last trip to France on the penultimate weekend. Only a small and overgrown path leads to it. If you don't know the location, you'll hardly find it; even from the winding country road below the chapel, it's barely visible. Inside were still several beautiful things - dusty plastic flowers, small Madonna statuettes and images of saints, as well as two rosary necklaces with crosses. In a broken stone the date 13th of April 1870 was engraved. However, I don't know when the secluded chapel was actually built. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  21. In early 2018 we visited one of the new tunnels of Paris metro which for the moment (May 2018) is still under construction. Recently I was told that this place is no longer accessible due to active works that doesn't stop even at night, so I will publish some pictures. Btw, we managed to get in only from the 2nd try - there is a security guy walking around the construction site (on the street). The new tunnel is 2km long. We walked till the end and on the way back checked out the end of the active line. There were two trains. Soon we heard some noise (like if someone'd open a door) and left the place.
  22. My take on Prison 15H and from what I gather there is going to be a fair few from this place coming to a forum near you Soon! Thanks to Phantom Bish and Camera shy for the Intel. Cheers guys. Seems we where out the same weekend as Mr Bish but missed him by a day.. Early morning start and a Euro tunnel trip purely to do this place and then home intime for tea..This is an advantage of living 45 mins from the Euro tunnel, met many euro explorers while in the place and some well kitted up graffers on the way out.,Other than that no problems where had,even the Gypo colony in the car park wasn’t an issue.. Enough bollox from me and here’s 15 of the 230 odd I took 60% of them I was happy with but no one wants to see a apic heavy report of the place!! Explored with Sx-riffraff,Obscurity,Spaceinvader and Urban Ginger
  23. cgeff

    France Rusty Mine

    Hi All, Some pictures of a mine. A spot quite dangerous but a great place ! Hope you will like these pictures
  24. Was reminded that I didn't posted anything yet so, here's a post of a recent visit to this mine. This one is not the safest one :-) . Some parts are already collapsed. There are several levels but the lower did we skip. Heard that the air quality is not the best there and we didn't bring the rope ladder . Was nice to explore. Hope you enjoy looking at this.
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