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Found 208 results

  1. I’ve visited this nice theater during my 10 day trip to Italy this summer. Located in the center of a small town, access was very easy. Although there were people on the street outside, but they were not interested in us. Unfortunately, I know nothing about its history. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  2. Not quite the kind of pictures I usually take - this time, unfortunately, only smartphone shots in a moderate to terrible quality ... The search for access took a little longer. No chance from the front. So on the back accross a field, through thorn hedges, and finally climb over a gate, a wall and over a pile of rubble ... On one side, parts of the house had already collapsed, where I was able to climb through a wall gap into the interior. The property belonged to the owner of a brickyard. A calendar showed "November 1967". Maybe the house has been abandoned at that time. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34
  3. I found this villa in the middle of nowhere in Italy. I hardly know anything about the history. A calendar on the wall shows the year 1998. At this time the property was probably abandoned. The owner of the large villa with elaborate furniture was certainly not poor. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
  4. The palace was built in the 14th - 15th centuries and extended especially in the second half of the 17th century. Recently, the aristocratic estate was inhabited by a painter & artist. I don't know since when the palace is abandoned. Access was through lots of scrub and stinging nettles. Inside, unfortunately, a lot has been stolen in recent years. Such as art books, easels and a telescope. But the place is still very nice. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  5. An abandoned Italian villa next to the road. Nothing really special, because unfortunately stripped, but at least still with a few nice ceilings. Due to the holey floors and cracked stairs, it was partially a bit tricky to enter the upper floors to photograph the ceiling paintings. But everything went well, without any crash or collapse. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  6. A small abandoned church, but with a lot and nice interior. It was built in 1927. The way through blackberry thorns was not really comfortable with shorts. During the visit, there was also a storm with lots of rain. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  7. Discovered while searching on Google Earth. A larger property with several buildings and holey roofs, set off the beaten track. So of course I had to go there and check it ... Decades ago it was apparently started with the renovation, which eventually came to a standstill again. The buildings were partly surrounded by overgrown scaffolding, but unfortunately completely stripped. Inside there was a large fireplace and a room with wall and ceiling paintings, that could only be accessed via one of the scaffolding. The upper floors of the partly overgrown, ruinous gate tower, whose staircase has probably caved in ages ago, were no longer accessible. On the net, I could found the information that the palazzo was originally from the first half of the 17th century. With the death of Count von M., the noble family of the builder family died out at the end of the 19th century. Most recently, the property (at this time owned by a monastery) was used as a wine store at the beginning of the 20th century. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
  8. I found this former marble quarry in my search for more abandoned places via Google Earth. The quarry already existed in the 13th century. In the 14th to more intensive use in the 17th century, the marble was used for monasteries. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  9. Imagine that you are preparing yourself for an exploration for like a month and you are dreaming about it for like a year. Then the day finally arrives and EVERYTHING that could stop us happen at the same time. Not only this was a rainy day, but this was the infamous day that a bridge in Italy collapsed (I think that all of you heard about it), so the viability was totally blocked and we had almost run out of fuel. In addition this bomb shelter was actually really close to the bridge itself so there were many policemen and soldiers in the area. But at the end the exploration went smoothly. About the site itself... This was an air raid shelter built during World War II, but it was reserved only to the workers of a near steel mill. It is 2 kilometers long and it could hold more or less 4500 people. I know that somewhere there are some big cages full of rocks which are designed to protect the bunker from the shock wave of the bombs, but we could't find them. Even if I posted almost all the photos (because I think that all of them are important), here you can find the complete album at higher res: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmgY363L "Move rapidly; don't think only about yourselves, other your comrades are still outside in danger." "Do not stop: move on." Left: "Don't smoke; air polluted by smoke causes illness to many of your comrades; give proof of politeness." Right: "Zone reserved to the P.A.A squads." (I don't know what "P.A.A" stands for) These stairs are completely covered in limestone.
  10. This time I was actually in vacation with two friends of mine (they aren't explorers), but while we were organising all of our trip we decided to explore this abandoned and untouched printing works (hope that this is a proper name) that I had discovered a few weeks before. Those 2 guys were a couple of graphic designers so they enjoyed the visit even more. This plant used to create mostly the "Action Transfers", which are called "Trasferelli" in Italy: today they are produced mostly on commission and not for business. If you want the complete album, here it is: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmr2nWrm
  11. Unfortunately, I don't know anything about the history of this former cinema. Access was very easy. Inside, there were a few nice things left. And a poor, mummified cat. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  12. A very strange house of an artist or similar. Very overgrown, in the middle of a small forest. Inhabited by at least 10,000 bloodthirsty mosquitoes ...! Unfortunately, some of the ornate statues have been destroyed in recent months. Inside it was quite dark, so I lit the photos with a torch. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  13. This place was a restaurant, incredible restaurant!!
  14. Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  15. The church was built between 1791 and 1794. Today it is very ruinous and overgrown, but still worth a visit. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  16. Built in the early 1700s, and modified during the 1800s, the external stables have recently collapsed.
  17. Lil mix of religious spots in Italia ❤️
  18. One of my favorites from my first Italy trip. For a industry freak like me it can't get any better then this. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  19. This had been on my to-do list for some time having seen previous reports. I suppose for that reason it was more of a pilgrimage than an explore but well enjoyable nonetheless. We made a right meal of getting in here but it was necessary with the amount of activity near where we wanted to be. Not to mention the security chickens and sheep announcing our presence to all and sundry. The snow didn't help either, making sure we had no choice but to 'leave only footprints' from one end of the site to the other. Anyway, nobody came looking for us luckily and what a belter of a place. The main building is not only stunning but has some intact operating rooms full of equipment. I could have spent all day in there and I'll most likely pop back if ever in the area again as I'm told there is a morgue somewhere. We did try a few other buildings but they were mostly bricked up and the ones we got into didn't have much inside. A fruitful trip with elliot5200 and @shaddam Built in 1871, the site began as a charity hospital. It then became a military training college before turning into a psychiatric hospital. It was commonly referred to as "the factory of ideas" by locals. About 500 people worked there as doctors, clerks, nurses, and maintenance staff. It's busiest period of admissions came during WWII where the number of patients never fell below 1,000. The total number of patients reached it's peak of 1,400 in the 1960s. It was closed in 1981 when Basaglia law came into force. This was the act which signified a large reform of the psychiatric system in Italy. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. One of the other buildings with little inside 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Not a baaaaad explore at all Thanks for looking
  20. This was the first stop in Italy with Elliot5200 & @shaddam last month. I don't know any history unfortunately but it's a stunning building and I wouldn't mind living in it! I normally write a lot more than this but I'm not sure what else to say. Oh, we went for a pizza afterwards. Pics: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. & 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Thanks for looking
  21. In 1960 Alfa Romeo grow out of their old factory located in Portello and started with the construction of a new plant located in Arese. This new plant had an Centro Stile (Design centre), Offices, Powerplant, Centro Technico (technical centre), and much more. Unfortunately in 2005 the whole factory closed after the last V6 Busso engine rolled out of the factory which made the once modern factory abandoned. In 2014 the factory was demolished to make place for a mall and parking spots, the only thing that still remain are the old technical centre and the design centre. In the summer of 2017 I was in the area so I decided to go and have a look at what remains of the factory. To my surprise there were still sections open and it had even had some papers and some car parts inside. Thanks for reading and I hoped you liked it!
  22. The former children´s sanatorium ("colonia") is located somewhere in the Italian mountains and was once built for the treatment of ill children. The building itself was a mere time capsule, full of numerous sick beds, school inventory as well as old medical bottles, ointments and tinctures - all of those had exceeded their expiry date by decades. Moreover, we found old documents - old vaccination confirmations of the late 1960s as well as old patient´s lists of the 1950s.
  23. Yep, it's another Italian asylum! Last one from this trip. We changed our plans at the last minute to check on this instead of visiting one of the better known spots. It was a bit of a gamble as we had no info and it was going to be the last explore of the trip, but it could be epic. I'm glad we did as it turned out to be a banger. Something interesting in every room and corridor pretty much. Lights still on in places and parts that looked not long abandoned. Probably the closest thing I've seen to one of the classic UK asylums in their hey day. We only had time to get around half of it unfortunately so I'm sure there is a lot more to see in here. Visited with elliot5200 & @shaddam Freaky bastard door, like something out of a horror film creaking and banging of it's own accord. Never heard anything like it. The first of many in here. Lights still on in some parts This semi-circular section was a secure wing for violent patients. Inside one of the cells and the adjacent corridor We popped our heads into the chapel just before we left as it was a bit bait. Very nice in there but it looked very much still in use so we didn't hang about. And that's all for now. Thanks for looking
  24. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
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