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  1. Albania is one of those countries where I didn't really know what to expect. Recent history saw the collapse of communism in the 90s which caused the economy to crash. Since then It has made remarkable economic progress, growing from one of the poorest nations in Europe to a middle-income country, with poverty declining by half during that period. We travelled from north to south and back again taking in a few places along the way. The people are friendly, the food is good, it has decent weather, and everything is extremely cheap. Here's some of what I got up to with Adders, extreme_ironing, Otter and Reenie. In the main square of Tirana the National History Museum has this famous mosaic called 'The Albanian' on the front. It tells the story of how Albanians have fought against invasion and occupation throughout the centuries. Just down the road are these colourful government buildings In the middle of the countryside we passed this communist monument, the 5 red stars symbolising communist ideology Shëngjin Naval Base After an epic fail elsewhere we headed to this small naval base which turned out to be pretty cool. I've already written a separate report on this so I won't include much about it here. Fier Power Plant Fier Power Station was Albania's largest thermal power plant having 6 identical groups of 31 MW each, totalling a capacity of 186 MW. The plant was decommissioned in 2007. Much of the site next to it was a fertiliser factory powered by the plant. The whole site has been completely stripped now, leaving just bland shells of buildings. The imposing chimneys and cooling towers however remain visible for miles as a reminder of its former importance. Old security office next to the original gate Always wanted a shot of adders pissing Cooling tower ladders have long since been removed The best bit about this place was taking in the views from one of the factory towers, although the staircase was a bit of a headfuck Factory buildings below The turbine hall. Amazingly two security guys appeared from nowhere and made us leave before we could grab any shots of the inside. You're really not missing much though as the turbines have been removed along with everything else. Why anyone is securing it is completely beyond me! Kombinati Metalurgjik, Elbasan Elbasan is located about 50km from the capital of Albania, Tirana. The Kombinati Metalurgjik steel works, a flagship of the Albanian industry, was built between the 1960s and 1970s. The complex was built by Chinese engineers with the assistance of Albanian specialists. The levels of pollution caused by the plant were the subject of much controversy in the 90s. The size of the site is colossal but only a few buildings remain operational today. Much of it is derelict beyond repair or has already been flattened. Most of the buildings you see in the distance here are barely standing. You can see the remains of a blast furnace to the left. The only buildings worth a look were located right next to the live site. This one was locked up tight with several dogs acting as security inside. Next door a few buildings were wide open Buckets for pouring molten steel Small control room. After this we went back to the car and found an old man shaking his walking stick at us angrily so we left. There were a few more buildings full of stuff that we didn't manage to get into as they were well locked up. Definitely a bit more to see here I think but nothing too epic. Përrenjas - Locomotive Graveyard The country's first standard gauge line was built in 1947. From then on the construction of the country's rail network underwent significant development as Albania was considered to be the only state in Europe not to have standard rail service. By 1987, 677 km of railway had been constructed in total, linking the main urban and industrial centres for the first time since the end of World War II. Train transport was the main transportation method until 1990. After the collapse of Communism, and increase in use of motor vehicles, the network fell into disrepair. Today the country's rail network is almost entirely defunct. In Përrejas we visited this group of abandoned diesel ČKD T669 locomotives. Përrenjas abandoned station. There was a man inside there who didn't appreciate us climbing on the trains Pyramid of Tirana On 14 October 1988, the pyramid opened as a museum about the legacy of Enver Hoxha, the long-time leader of Communist Albania, who died in 1985. When built, the pyramid was said to be the most expensive individual structure ever constructed in Albania. After 1991, following the collapse of Communism, the museum closed and for several years it was repurposed as a conference centre and exhibition venue. During the 1999 Kosovo War, the former museum was used as a base by NATO and humanitarian organisations. Since 2001, part of the Pyramid has been used as a broadcasting centre by Albanian media outlets Top Channel and Top Albania Radio. Numerous proposals have been made to demolish the structure but the majority of Tirana's citizens are against the demolition. In 2017 it was announced that the pyramid will not be demolished, but refurbished. In 2018, a new project was unveiled that would turn the Pyramid into a technology centre for youth focused on computer programming, robotics, and start ups. Inside I bumped into a sleepy eyed squatter who invited me to take a look around. We meant to have a pop at this under construction skyscraper overlooking the main square but unfortunately ran out of time Not a particularly impressive view from up here but certainly a unique one A few friends we made along the way A bunker full of goats all set for the apocalypse. Just one of the 173,371 bunkers in Albania! Thanks for looking!
  2. In 2017, during a holiday to Japan, I visited the Hakone area, south-east of Mt Fuji, via day-trip from Tokyo. One of the stops was Mt Hakone – accessed via cable-car from lake Ashi. Due to timing, we only had a few minutes a the top of Mt Hakone. This was my first encounter with the eerie - Komagatake Ropeway top station. (Above pic is a screenshot from Google Maps street view) In 2019 on another visit to Japan I decided to make a point of visiting this mountain again – to get close look... In 2017, only the ground floor of the station was open to the public, holding only a ticket counter, small gift shop, a photo booth, and some vending machines. The stairwell to the second floor was blocked off, and the sign for the bathrooms was covered up. (Screenshot from Google Maps street view) This enormous concrete block, perched on a cliff edge of Mt Hakone serves as anchor point for the cable car, and looks out over lake Ashi. Its showing the signs of its age. Wikipedia says it opened in 1963. It feels strange that something this run down is still in operation... In 2017 – I desperately wanted to have a look upstairs of the creepy building, but didn't want to risk trying to sneak past the stairs from the lobby... In 2019, the blocked sign was removed from the stairs!, and I guess they opened up the bathrooms on level 2. As soon as we entered the lobby, I decided to dash for it... my wife happily exploring the gift shop downstairs. The blockade on the stairs was now moved to the second floor – with only the bathrooms accessible. With no tourists on this floor yet, I figured – this is it - now or never!, and I jumped over the boom and headed upstairs – careful to listen for any noises from upstairs... My heart was pounding as I snuck further! I had to stop shooting a bit as some tourists just around the corner from me came up the stairs to visit the bathrooms... (noises from camera shutter...) As I went higher, you could see that the walls of the upper floors were never even painted. I wonder if they have ever been in service since 1963! I guess when they build this behemoth, they envisaged a restaurant and maybe visitor centre, maybe accommodation in the upper floors? A wooden trimming on the stair handrail as you approach the top floor. The top floor- A chair against the wall,and some colourful stickers against the glass doors. The only colour in this dreary building. I'm guessing one of the top-station employees comes up here for their lunch break... The top floor is basically empty, except for some communications gear that was probably installed much later. After this I snuck back down. I regret not checking if any of the bathrooms were open. More external shots: I think these are heat-lamps,keeping the motor-controllers from freezing. Besides this top station building, the only other structure visible at the top is Hakonejinja Mototsumiya temple. A blue tile on the ground along the path to Hakone-jinja The temple shows no signs of life... On the way back down: As we were ascending the mountain, from the gondola, you can see some wooden cabins in the forest below... Some of them looked a bit worse off... I decided to go have a look when we came back down... There was a sign board next to the road leading up the the cabins – The Hakone Prince Dog Cottage. It is spring – sakura season. The cabins near the bottom of the mountain were still looking ok – they were probably still being rented out, but there were no signs of any visitors or staff. As you go higher up the mountain, it was clear that some of these cabins have not been in service in years. Completely overgrown, full of moss, algae and weeds. A tree growing out of the front porch suggests the age of disuse. Peering through the mosquito netting, I can see and old CRT TV and VCR There are downed power lines and more trees. Some of the side roads leading to the cabins are completely overgrown. I don't think anyone has walked down there for years. No more Mario-cart for you White blossoms Looks like this one has a fridge, that probably held those two tubs of whatever. Outside After this encounter, my first experience in “urban exploration”, I started noticing, in the town where we stayed (Atami), and along the roads of Yugawara which we drove through, there were plenty of eerie relics- (Screenshot from Google Maps street view) and many run down and abandoned places- I made a point to explore further... A roadside visitor centre / rest stop, found across the road from a toll-gate. No idea how old this is – its definitely not in operation anymore. No name to it in Google maps. I pulled off to the side of the road and walked across the empty parking area. It had a crazy amount of parking space. I don't think it was ever full. There was a small van parked out back, and a guy messing around. No idea how it got in – both entrances were barred. Mt Fuji in the background Remnants of a hotel or possible a rec centre / maybe hot-spring pool- Dated 2006 There is some underground structure as well. Looked too dangerous to explore. The upper structure, attached to the mountain, leads you to go further up Very overgrown up there. I couldn't get over the bridge to go further up. The bridge lead over an artificial waterfall I was making a lot of noise cracking through the bamboo... I ducked down for a bit while a traffic warder appeared. Overgrown pedestrian walkway. There is literally nothing on the other side – just the steep mountain. I wonder how many people have ever crossed that bridge. I think this is the “town office branch” - maybe a local council building. Only half of the building is still in use. The other half is piled full of junk. A walkway over the road- Leading to a school – also abandoned... This school really intrigued me – I thought there might be some good photos to be had. At the point, as I entered into a courtyard area, there was a car with a guy in it. He saw me to I just waved and pretended to be a dumb tourist. I continued to take a few pics, but he came out of his car and followed me for a bit... I pretended to leave. The guy went back to his car – then I doubled-back to check out the gym! Not being able to explore this area further, I left, however, later that day I noticed on Google maps that there is supposed to be a pool at the back of the school! - and also there is a road going up towards the back. Since we'd be travelling back past this area, I decided to give it one more go. At the back of the school is a forest, leading up a mountain. The road stops quite a while away, and you have to make your way through the forest towards the school. Lucky for me, a path was cleared here, leading parallel to the school. I guess to prevent forest fires from reaching the school. First obstacle was this ditch or embankment. About 1.5m deep. Continuing- As I got near the back of the school where the pool was supposed to be, there was a big ravine. I had to go down there, over some embankments and down a further set of retaining walls. Everything was wet and covered in moss. I wasn't sure if I'd be able to climb back up the walls. It was pretty quiet out here. Only me struggling through the bamboos. I reached the pool!! There was a thicket of bamboo growing around it... An abandoned hotel on the shore- When we got back to the small town to return the rental car, I spotted this place walking to the train station- I couple more random shots
  3. 大家好! My oh my, how long has it been since I posted a report? Exploring has become a low priority for me ever since I left the UK, even if I've always kept tabs on new sites shared here and on social media. Truth be told learning Mandarin and my lady have taken a much bigger priority in recent years, plus my lady is no fan of me going about it alone so that makes organising jaunts more challenging. I have visited a fair few sites around Taiwan, but compared to Europe there is so little here to get me to jump on the next train there because beautiful architecture is just so rare and even noteworthy industrial sites are few and far between; many places are just rotting concrete shells. So this report here is meant to be a compilation of my latest explores to date which I feel don't have enough bite to warrant standalone reports. There will be more reports to come in the future, but since I left my torch and tripod in England it will be some time before I visit these. I trust the results will not be disappointing though. 亞哥花園/Encore Garden, July 2018 Visited with some colleagues and non-explorers. I'd always been aware of this one, as it's situated close to my favourite hiking trails just outside of Taizhong where I live. But being me I never made a move until last year. It's an abandoned theme park in Dakeng district, opened in 1981 and was a hugely popular site that attracted around 1m people a year. Like several sites in Taiwan it was hit by the 921 earthquake in 1999 which severely damaged the area, causing attendance to drop dramatically. Eventually the financial losses incurred forced the place to close in 2008. On most days there is a security guard with dogs at the top of the site, living in a shack. However as of last year the entire site has been repurposed as a rally racetrack. Pay $100 (that's £2.50) to enter and you can sit back and spectate, but before that we chose to explore the park first. Initially we were in full stealth mode, when we spotted people in hi vis vests dotted around the site as well as the guard's dogs barking at us, but after seeing others drive round with their scooters we realised it was a free for all for today. What I found really fascinating about exploring in Taiwan compared to Europe and other places is how the fertile, humid tropical enviroment is far more hostile to built structures which means nature takes over rapidly once the place is abandoned; the restaurant was completely covered in thick, thick dust, and other structures had started to be completely invaded by tree branches. Old arcade machines left behind Because of thick shrub finding the entrance to this ride took a bit of careful searching, but we got to it. It turns out as long as we stayed off the roads as much as possible, we were at free to roam whenever we wanted. The racing stewards didn't mind us at all. Unfortunately the outdoor auditorium was inaccessible because there were too many race cars on the route leading up to it. Another thing that's incredibly striking about Taiwan and nature is the frequency of earthquake tremors. In my experience they seem to hit every few months, and in mountainous and rural areas can trigger minor (or major) landslides; look at the next 2 pictures and compare to older photos... By stark contrast to the western world, obviously with a few exceptions Asians and the Taiwanese have utmost respect for abandoned sites. Whether this be rooted in a fear of the supernatural (people in the west believe in ghosts, but superstitions are taken far more seriously here), they treat abandoned sites as tombs and relics of the past to be treated with respect. It's because of this, little if any effort is made to seal any buildings from intruders and yet sites see so little vandalism. Security guards are rare, too. Another thing is that for several sites upon closure and abandonment the owners do not bother to remove items from buildings, regardless of their value. The fundamental exception to this rule being statues and religious iconography, because to leave these to rot is to bring huge misfortune on one's life. So although decent sites are indeed rare, exploring those that are around are unique experiences in which you can really lose yourself and let your imagination run free. I then made my way inside the buildings in the middle of the site, and was stunned to find the power still on. It turns out even on a Sunday there were workers inside. Unfortunately the site manager walked in, then politely asked me to leave after this photo was taken. It's far from epic, but it's well worth sharing as it's so vastly different from Crapalot. I'm still alive by the way... Thank you so much for reading, and it's a real pleasure to be back. TBM x
  4. Solo jaunts. So after Chinese New Year there was yet another public holiday in Taiwan, and you know what that means? More exploring! This here is a compilation of different sites all well known to the exploring network, all very famous but compared to the general benchmark not enough to warrant standalone reports again. As I mentioned before, sometimes it's about scratching the itch just to get it off your mind rather than the drop-everything hit-the-road urge you get for some places. 台灣民俗村/Taiwan Folk Village Taiwan Folk Village was a mock-traditional park east of Huatan, near Zhanghua in the Bagua Mountain Scenic Area. Opened in 1993 it was a hugely successful site, a showcase of Taiwan traditional temples and aboriginal architecture (straw huts, temples and so forth) although if you ask me it all felt tacky with little historic value. That's the trouble with Taiwan; compared to Europe precious little remains of genuine, traditional architecture of dynasty's gone past. Not only that, I cannot understand what desire people have to turn such places into theme parks complete with swimming pools and rides rather than showcase the history. I digress. As with so many places in Taiwan, the 921 Earthquake meant a sharp drop in visitor numbers, pushing the operating company into the red, culminating in closure come 2012. It's in the backwaters of Taiwan with no public transport, so I had to begrudgingly take a taxi to get there. Unfortunately the taxi driver was oblivious to my intentions and dropped me off at the main gate, in full view of security. I get out, and there they are sat outside the cabin staring at me and wondering what I want to do. I don't want to ruin my chances and arouse suspicion, so I walked away as they watched. Awkward. I walk up the road and look for a way in, but there's a huge drop from the road down to the boundary fence. Getting in was a mission to say the least, having to find a safe spot to drop down and then find a suitable point to actually enter the site! I finally found one after considerable effort, then had to beat through thick bushes to get onto the roof of the main walls. A challenge, but I have an itch to scratch so I don't have a choice. Although I've lived in Taiwan for 2+ years, for those unfamiliar with Asian architecture the attention to detail in temples is beautiful; each aspect is unique. Unfortunately the interior was stripped and somewhat decayed with zero interest. The site is not fully abandoned, however. There are plenty of buddhist shrines and the mock-village buildings are still maintained by on-site staff. I saw a handful of scooters parked up around the site, and was certain there was someone lurking in places least expected so I had to be very careful. The biggest problem however was a dozen or so stray dogs who ran around in packs. Any sight of a foreigner liked myself triggered a chorus of barking, not out of hostility but perhaps curiosity and simply being an unexpected presence. Unfortunately this meant I had to move fast from building to building to avoid getting attention from security or caretakers. I tried to access the best part of the site, the beautiful mock-village quarters in the middle of the site, however to protect the shrines and interior these were completely locked up. At the northernmost part of the site was a large temple, which I managed to get inside however the interior was completely empty and lacking in interest. I was absolutely certain there was a caretaker lurking inside too, so only 2 shots. I went in search of the carousel and theme park attractions to the west of the site, however since the previous reports these have all been demolished. No loss, but that meant it was time to leave, so I headed back out and bade farewell. A derp for sure, but not a complete waste of time. Stay tuned for the rest. Love as always, TBM x
  5. I had an awesome time here, it's a huge abandoned factory It's still guarded, but easy to visit .. I've spend a lot of time inside and a local person also told us about the history of the place. His family didn't have any hot water, so when he was a child , his mother used to take him to the factory to give him a bath .
  6. The history of the Albanian Navy dates back to 1925, following the creation of the Albanian Republic. Albanian naval forces operate out of two main bases; Bishti-i-Palles in Durrës, and Pasha Liman in Vlorë, with four reserve bases respectively in Shëngjin, Porto Palermo, Saranda and a submarine base on Sazan island. The vessels of the Albanian naval force are mostly patrol craft and support craft as well as four whisky class submarines (Soviet Union built in the early Cold War period) which have been taken out of service at Pasha Liman. In Shëngjin a Soviet built minesweeper M-111 and an AFD-115 gunship remain abandoned at the entrance to a bunker. The Albanian navy still operates out of Shëngjin in a low capacity so it's still an active military zone but you are allowed to drive through it to reach a beach resort on the other side. Handy for us! Visited with adders, extreme_ironing, otter and reenie. Here's what we found.... AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M-111 - A mine warfare ship designed for the location of and destruction of naval mines which combines the role of a minesweeper and minehunter in one hull. Minesweepers are equipped with mechanical or electrical devices, known as "sweeps", for disabling mines, so waterways are maintained clear for safe shipping. This one appears to have been disused since 1996 (the date of a calendar on board), just prior to the Albanian civil war, when many vessels of the Albanian navy were seriously damaged. Behind it sits this half-submerged AFD P115 - Albanian Navy gunship (Chinese type 62 "Shanghai-II") which has had its 57mm gun mount removed They sit in front of the entrance to a navigable bunker which was inaccessible. Another entrance parallel was also sealed although we reached the blast door for that one The AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M111 was named after Mujo Ulqinaku, an Albanian sergeant of the Royal Albanian Navy, known for his resistance to the Italian forces during the Italian Invasion of Albania in 1939. Armed with only a machine gun, he was placed at the centre of the defense line and fought uninterruptedly until he was eventually killed by an artillery shell from an Italian warship in the last hour of the battle. He was given the People's Hero of Albania award posthumously. On board the AFD - M111 An old gun at the front You can see an active patrol boat moored up on the left of the shot Inside the AFD - M111 Communications cabin A small engine room Hatches and squat toilets Kitchen All the cabins were locked except for this one Some old military posters Back on land, this AFD S104 - Huchuan class 'motor torpedo boat' is waiting to be scrapped. Powered by Soviet-era engines, these hydrofoil-equipped boats are capable of 50 knots (93 km/h; 58 mph) and carry two torpedo tubes for torpedoes, with some known to be armed with naval mines. A few dilapidated buildings remain nearby This building to the left was manned but we were just out of view so we took a quick peek at these old military vehicles Some rusty torpedoes lay on the ground alongside one of them A couple of old trucks overgrown by vegetation above the bunker. We were aware of someone from the base heading in our direction at this point so we hopped in the car and made tracks We made it to the beach resort on the other side of the military zone where unfortunately the pigs were waiting for us. Thankfully they just grunted a bit and we were on our way ? Just in time to catch the sunset! Thanks for looking
  7. I have never been happy with the results of my expolration but nevertheless it was one of my absolute favorites. This outstanding piece of Brutalism architecture placed in the phenomenal surrounding of the beautiful historical city. PORN!
  8. Tkvarcelli was an important coal mining town in the war torn region of Abkhazia, a de facto independent republic which remains internationally recognised as part of Georgia. During the Abkhazian war (from 1992 to 93), Tkvarcheli withstood, through Russian humanitarian and military aid, an uneasy siege by the Georgian forces. As a result of the war the town's industries all but stopped and its population has since decreased from approximately 22,000 to just 5,000 people. Abkhazia is on the list of places where the FCO (Foreign & Commonwealth Office) advises against all travel. There is no UK consulate support if anything goes wrong so if you were to lose your passport for example, you'd be pretty fucked. With that in mind, and having read a few horror stories of tourists being aggressively robbed around Tkvarcelli, we were pretty skeptical about coming here. Thanks to some advice from @Olkka, who visited earlier in the year, we chose to hire a driver who knew the area well and we didn't encounter any problems. Top tip of the day - take a bottle of vodka for the guys demolishing the power plant and you'll be reet. Tkvarcelli power plant has seen better days. On the upper levels there were holes in the floor everywhere, hidden by overgrown plants and moss. We tried to be extra careful although it was difficult to tell if any structure we were standing on was safe. There were workers actively demolishing the roof above one end of the plant as well so we had to stick to the opposite end. Thankfully that's where all the good stuff was. The only other obstacle was the squatters but they didn't seem to mind us being there. Workers were sporadically dropping huge sections of roof onto the ground from above Much has been dismantled The Squatters Manoeuvring around this building was so sketchy These stairs were clinging on by dear life. We went up these but the stairs above were completely mangled Nope Coal conveyor chute Control Room. Pretty battered but I loved it in here The central turbine. I may have got a bit carried away photographing this. It would be amazing to have seen this in its hey day. Akarmara was a nearby mining town. Wars and economic change have emptied the town of the 5,000 people who lived there in the 1970s leaving it pretty much a ghost town. Now it is estimated only 35 people remain. It's completely cut off except for a rocky road full of potholes that takes around an hour to navigate. On our arrival we were greeted by some strange looks from the elderly locals, although the local children seemed fascinated by us and one accompanied us for our whole time there. It's a very surreal place where buildings that have a light outside signify that they are lived in. This is to ward off any looters. None of the buildings look lived in otherwise as they are all falling apart. The train station has been completely reclaimed by the forest. This building was completely trashed except for one flat in the middle inhabited by a young family. Thanks for looking.
  9. Back in the early 2000's I started videotaping (yes, we used tape back then) some of my explorations of various abandoned industrial sites in and around Toronto. I eventually made a film called Echoes of Forgotten Places, it may be one of the earliest documentaries on the subject. It's available once again on DVD region 0: https://waveshaper.shop/products/echoes-dvd The trailer is still on youtube:
  10. This is my personal sweet spot. It is an abandoned cement factory. It was built in 1949 and was the big employer of the residents in the nearby small town. After ww2 the need for cement was enormous due to the building of new houses. It was closed in 1981, after that some recycling experiments were done until the place was completely abandoned in 2003.
  11. Hello everybody. Today I want to share an especially untouched location with you guys. This resort has been closed since the early 2000's and has since then been sitting around in Austria. Due to its remote location, there was no vandalism beside two broken down windows. Originally, this was used as a rehabilitation center for the elderly, as far as I know. Also located on site are a medical facility for routine check-ups and dietary advice. I'd say this was the best location I ever visited in terms of how well it was preserved. Full Album (Flickr): https://flic.kr/s/aHskMyQEbT Instagram: @ofcdnb Raw Exploration (YouTube) !no ads and not selling shit, if anyone is concerned with that, just sharing explorations!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=odJKQwaVas0 DSC_3688.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3690.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3692.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3697.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3710.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3712.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3716.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3718.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3732.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3744.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3751.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3763.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3765.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3775.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3776.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3777.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3780.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3783.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3784.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3798.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3816.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3825.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3833.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3845.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3846.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3855.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3858.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3859.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3861.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3862.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3864.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3872.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3886.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3888.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3889.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3890.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3899.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3901.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
  12. Hello once again everybody, now I'll get everything right on the first try (with BB-Codes and all). This is another Mansion, where I sadly don't have much information about either. I hope you enjoy the pictures nontheless. Instagram would be @ofcdnb for anyone interested. Full Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmydBVYN DSC_3065.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3067.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3069.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3071.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3081.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3086.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3089.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3096.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3098.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3101.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
  13. This building is confirmed to have been built some time around 1850. It is abandoned since AT LEAST 2013, when the first reports came onto the web. There are various documents lying around the building, either on the top floor in the storage area beneath the roof. Hope you guys enjoy. By the way, I hope no one hates me for linking to Flickr directly, as it would require me to export all images manually and upload all of them to various forums, which is more than time consuming. I was asked to link the pictures directly, so I decided to take the what I think are the best ones and embed them, and the rest of the pictures (which are more documentation than art) will be available on the Flickr Link. Hope that's okay with everyone. Greetings. https://flic.kr/s/aHsmt2Y9ob Report is from Dec, 2018. If anyone is interested at all, my instagram is @ofcdnb. DSC_2946.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_2953.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_2964.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_2984.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_2986.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_2988.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_2990.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3000.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3018.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr DSC_3043.jpg by anthrx, auf Flickr
  14. As i promise i came back on the other day to this wonderfull house, this time someone was there and some of the windows where open. A take some photos with this incredible light. And finally explored the rest of the house, it has some really big rooms, each one more beautiful than the other. I also got a lot of new information on the property. You can read about the first visit here: Now let's go see the house. This is the dinning room, In here the family would dine with a wonderfull view of the river and the city on the other side, with their carved fireplace giving them warm. This room is really big, around 3 to 3 and a half meter tall. This is the most beautifull in my opinion. It would be the living room and also a place to entretain guests. It as a incredible fireplace with carved wood and as views to the front of the house and river, unfortunately the floor is full of pieces of chandelier. This derelict chapel once hosted private prayers, the priest would come from the church every sunday to give it to the count's family. This is the guest room, also very damaged. This is the entrance hall, it has a wonderfull dome covering it, through this doors already passed princes, dukes, counts, Presidents and industry tycoons. This stairs lead to the main bedroom, the iron work in beautifull. Over the stair a rotten skylight let light shine on the old stairs. This is the main bedroom, it as a balcony but is too exposed to the street, in here the last true count died 40 years after the monarchy was abolished. This is the extension that where added to the house in the 30's It's really a wonderfull house, a remainder of a far by gone era. Hope you enjoyed.
  15. Tskaltubo was a popular spa resort, famous for its healing mineral waters and radon bath treatments. The first sanatoriums with in-patient facilities were built in 1925 and in 1931 Tskaltubo was designated as a spa resort by the Soviet government. Under the communist regime, a spa break was a prescribed, and mostly compulsory, annual respite, as the “right to rest” was inscribed in the Russian constitution. A visit to the doctors could result in being dispatched to somewhere like Lithuania or Georgia where spa towns were renowned for the healing properties of their mineral waters. It was one of Stalin’s favourite vacation spots. During WWII, the hotels were used as hospitals but after the war, their popularity increased and by the 1980s Tskaltubo was one of the most sought-after tourist destinations in the Soviet Union. Georgia’s independence in 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in late December 1991, signalled the collapse of Tskaltubo’s spa industry. Without guests, most of the hotels and resorts were forced to close their doors. Today many of them are home to refugees who fled the conflict in Abkhazia in 92/93 and needed to be rehoused. This one however has been fenced off and remains empty behind a fence with 24 hour security patrols. Apparently it was bought by a local millionaire who has plans to turn it into a luxury hotel although those plans appear to have stalled. I was a bit nervous about this one as we'd seen security the night before and they looked like regular police. The signs on the fence suggested they were 'security police' and their website claims they operate under the control of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia. We very nearly had a run in with one of them patrolling but managed to make a quick getaway thankfully. I really enjoyed it in here. We'd not seen any internal pictures so it was a proper treat to discover what was inside. The theatre was absolutely stunning. Visited with Elliot5200 on what was a great trip to a fascinating country! Thanks for looking.
  16. Been wanting to get in this place ever since I saw it years ago. These are just a few pictures I took The Ghajn Tuffieha Military Camp dates back to the late 19th century. By 1910, a formal military camp was in place consisting of timber ’Crimea Huts’ which were later replaced with more permanent masonry replacements, Throughout the immediate post-war years up to the late 1960s, the Ghajn Tuffieha Camp represented one of the busiest spots on the island for military training for both British and NATO forces. In the late 1970s the lower camp was converted into the Hal Ferh tourism accommodation complex.
  17. Gagra is a seaside resort in Abkhazia, a de facto republic in northwestern Georgia. It used to be a popular holiday destination until the Georgian-Abkhazian conflict broke out in 1992. Like much of Abkhazia, it has since become a shadow of its former self. The beaches are quiet and hundreds of its buildings lie abandoned, including this former sanatorium turned hotel, which we spotted looking overgrown on google maps. On our approach we saw what looked like a grand palace and thought we must have the wrong building, but sure enough it was the right one and turned out to be a bit of a stunner. Having looked online since we are by no means the first to visit here, and it even has a few reviews on trip advisor! Visited with elliot5200. I may have got a bit carried away with photos of this entrance hall The floor above Not a bad view from the balcony The back of the building was in worse condition I could have spent longer in here but we had other stuff to see. Much of the town is abandoned, and indeed much of Abkhazia. Thanks for looking.
  18. Hello folks! I recently visited an abandoned military barrack which was used by Pioneers for almost a hundred years. The area is abandoned for a few years now, 2015 the buildings were used for accommodation for refugees. Since somewhere around then, the place sits empty. There are already plans on how the area is going to be used once they tore down the remains of the barracks. A new district housing around 2500 people, a school campus and a kindergarten amongst other things will be built here. All that a car-free zone. Can't say I'm too bummed about that, sounds like it could be a sick project! DSC_6434 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6453 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6463 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6478 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6486 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6494 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6512 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6544 by anthrax, auf Flickr If I could excite you for more, check out the full album here or my post about it here.
  19. The Air Base was the largest underground facility in Europe. In the 3.5 Km long tunnels where 80 MIG 21 and up to 1000 soldiers. In the near barracks where 5000 soldiers more. This facility was really huge with all what you need (kitchen, power generators, hospital, fuel tanks, etc.) The where able to work and fly with 60 MIGs for 2 month without getting supplies. There is also an old DC-47 standing around.
  20. History It's been pretty hard to find history on this one, especially with all the information being in French Canadian. Located in the Villeray-Saint-Michael-Parc area of Montreal, Saint Bernadine de Sienne was a Catholic church built between 1955 and 1956. As well as providing religious services and confession, the church served as a hub for the local community. It provided room for nurseries, sunday school, youth activities among other community services. With the local community changing, less people regularly attending church and the rising cost of maintenance, Saint Bernadine de Sienne closed it's doors for the last time in April 2017. Explore This was one explore in a week of shenanigans. With 3 Brits, 2 Canadians, an Aussie and a Slovenian, this was very much an international affair. Access was laughable. While in there, photos happened, then we spent a couple of hours pissing around. This is probably the most relaxed I've ever felt in a derp. This is a beautiful building, it'll be a shame if it fell into disrepair or got torn down. I'm not a big fan of religion, but religious structures like churches, temples and mosques can be stunningly beautiful. For a twentieth century church, this was mesmerising and very photogenic. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) Cheers for Looking
  21. Hi everyone! I'm looking for people to visit locations together, somewhere in Belgium, NL, Luxembourg, France, or nearby) I'm rather experienced with urbex, but I don't really like doing it alone and it's hard to find people who also understand what they're doing at locations. I'm mostly interested in metro/underground stuff and roofs. Soon I'm planning to search for some roofs in Brussels and Amsterdam, and check out local metro. If you'd like to join me - let me know!
  22. A Visit to a Abandoned Locomotive Works, was in Germany. This site was given to us from a friend and so off we went to check it out.
  23. Abandoned Farmhouse - A Journey into the Past was filmed on a warm day ( 28c ), but inside the house it was ice cold... strange.
  24. Today we will have a Return Visit to the Home of Bicycle Repairman.
  25. Abandoned Fish Processing Plant was film on a very hot day (32c). It closed in 1989 due to lose of orders.
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