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  1. Sometimes I love my satnav today it took me a new route to the local cider farm rubber necking as i go along i spy a rather dilpidated chimney stack through the trees have a mooch? well it would be rude not to Built in 1812 thats all I know some nice stuff AND it is untouched by kids or taggers maybe I took its urbex virginity? lol
  2. Little trip to Wales over the weekend with Booie. This was a detour on the way home yesterday. Closed suddenly about 7 years ago and now up for auction. This lovely care home would have looked very grand in its prime no cheap plastic furniture here
  3. Visited with 3 non members not really knowing much about the place other than it looked pretty cool from the outside. Damp and water damage had done a pretty good job on the place but it was still well worth visiting and the start of an amazing day. History Can't really find much on this place but before its abandonment, it was owned by a local water authority in relation to the nearby reservoir of the same name. these animals were positioned exactly like this when i found them, honest...
  4. This was the second of two places we looked at, and was one of those 'we probably won't get into this one' places. It's always a bonus when you're pretty much convinced you wont get in then turn up & end up getting in 😀 The place was covered with mushrooms (Jews Ear apparently) and mould has taken it's hold on the place, by the time i got to the second floor started to feel a bit queasy breathing it all in, reminded me to get some masks for next time. A pretty cool place, with plenty to see and a variety of 'funky' lampshades... Started losing daylight by the time we reached the 3rd floor so the pics started to get gradually worse. History Not sure exactly when it opened but it was up & running in the 1930's. In it's day it stood on it's own extensive grounds over 3 acres. The greater portion of this was devoted to sun bathing and recreational lawns. The remainder was largely a kitchen garden which provided fresh garden produce to the tables. Quote from its promotional literature "The views from the bedrooms are delightful. Those on the front and on one side have an open outlook over the sea, the others overlook the golf links and the open country. Your views are in every room open, nothing shuts in any part of BRADDA PRIVATE HOTEL. 'BRADDA' has been entirely redesigned, enlarged, redecorated and refurnished, and is now one of the most beautiful hotels in the Island" Unsure exactly when it closed but from what i can tell it was around 2015. A proposal to demolish the dilapidated hotel and erect a residential care home, along with car parking, access and highway alterations, was submitted by Spaldrick Care Ltd in September last year. The developer estimated construction of the home would cost £5 million and create 60 full-time jobs. Around thirty families objected to the plans, as well as Port Erin Commissioners and the government's planning committee. Concerns were raised over the scale of the development, its impact on views, privacy, traffic and parking, as well as its conformity with both the Southern Area Plan, and the all-Island Strategic Plan. The plans were initially overruled by the Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture. However following a successful appeal by the developer this year, and on the recommendation of the planning inspector, the plans got the green-light. some of the lampshades some of the lovely mold & decay the place had to offer
  5. So this place has nothing now but memories and juvenile grafitti The Witch Ball Inn was popular with the army guys in the 1940s, due to its proximity to Prees Heath airfield. In particular the Americans stationed there took a special liking to it. And yet after that there's very little on the place. It boasted an impressive function room and a now filled-in swimming pool, At some point in the 1980s the building came under new ownership and the name changed to The Cherry Tree Hotel. The swimming pool was actually converted into a fish pond, and a fountain was installed in the bar area. The pub was visited by Michael Cain whenever he was in the area visiting his daughter. it closed down, around 2005 was boarded up and then was consequentially plundered and trashed.
  6. Fantastic Fireplaces and where to find them A complex of a bungalow; stables and former jockey's cottages one of which is still occupied when I opened the door and found the elderly resident eating his lunch!!! Exit stage right
  7. My first explore of last year, and it was in December 😆 oh well at least i'm 'back on the horse'. Met up with a local explorer & this was the first of two places we got into that day, the second place looked derelict but kind of wasn't & turns out we were just being tourists in some poor ladys home so probably wont be posting that one on here. This place was a bit of a shell but the decor was erm 'interesting'. And we found a dead bird, which was obviously awesome 😀 History stolen from https://www.forgottenisle.com/, a great site documenting all the cool derelict stuff on the Isle of Man. Shilley Aalin was built in the late 60's/early 70's by The Marquess of Queensberry despite locals protesting the build. It lay empty for some time after she passed away and was then bought and rented in the early 00s. Unfortunately, the group of people that rented it caused a lot of damage, and after they left the property lay empty and deteriorated.
  8. First report on here, or anywhere, in ages hope you all enjoy it. Been wanting to see inside this place for years, had a failed attempt a few years back but a recent fire and the property being bought last year worked to our advantage. Visited with my partner who has also tried & been caught by security so we were both pleased to gain access & finally get to have a look around the place. A bit of a shell in parts due to the fire & school holidays but still plenty to see & well wort the effort ☺️ History, stolen from www.culturevannin.im In 1892 the Liverpool Marine Biological Committee set up a base in two small buildings on Port Erin Bay; much of their work involved dredging excursions in the Irish Sea. The growing numbers of visiting naturalists and vacation classes began to ‘swamp’ these small buildings and in 1902 activities were relocated to bigger premises in the south-west corner of Port Erin Bay. In 1919 the University of Liverpool took control and ownership of the Marine Biological Station, and students studied Marine Biology there for a number of years. The last admission of students from the University of Liverpool was in Autumn 2005. The station closed in October 2006. The building fell victim to an arson attack on New Years Eve 2016 😠 The propery has been bought for £500,000 by Delgatie Ltd in 2018, which plan to replace the existing buildings with a mixed use development including residential, retail and commercial.
  9. Afternoon, Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up Heres some history from googles... The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2] Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2] The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2] During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2] On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2] In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6] We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though... On to some pics Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Thanks for looking DJ
  10. A mish mash of an industrial estate; a few empty units; big spiders old documents and lazy security
  11. Going back a couple of years now, i dusted the mountain bike off, topped myself up with Jack3d and headed to Harewood Forest! I covered some mileage over the day but killing two birds with one stone ensured i had a thoroughly enjoyable day but hitting the deck after mis-judging a tree root wasn't a highlight - blood was drawn but chicks dig scars though, right? Anywho, the history? Basically the RAF required a stretch of woodland not too close to a town, that was rail served and about 25 miles inland to store ammunition. New sidings and a branch network for military traffic were built at the Longparish station in 1942 and concrete roads were built in the forest and to effectively disperse ammunition to the storage huts. Bombs started arriving in the autumn of 1943 and the depot initially stored 40,000 tons which obviously increased around D-Day. Alas and onto the pictures: A once lovely Ford Prefect, slowly rusting away. Water tower Concrete roads were laid down to disperse ammunition to the storage huts The nissen huts were utilised for a far different reason 70 years ago Emergency Water Supply (EWS) - many of these are dotted throughout the forest This is Middleton House, it was a school but taken over and used as a HQ Maintenance Unit 202 This picture was actually with my father when we went in car, it wasn't there when i re-visited on my own. I'll leave it there, thanks for looking!
  12. Stopped off here on the way back from a Birmingham day trip what a stunning site and well worth the detour hope you enjoy the photos Tone Mill in Wellington is the last woollen mill in the West Country, with a priceless collection of original machinery still in place in the wet finishing works. The site is of European significance. The Prince's Regeneration Trust created The Tone Mill Partnership drawing together local people with an active interest in finding a sympathetic and economically viable new use for the site. Together we are continuing to develop plans that will restore the Grade II* listed woollen mill buildings as a working mill that can also be visited by the public. Tone Mill is a listed group of industrial buildings that date from the 18th and 19th Centuries. The site played an important role in the cloth industry in Wellington until the late 20th Century, here the woven cloth was dyed and finished and there is an exceptional amount of surviving machinery that illustrates the way the buildings were used and how the manufacturing process worked. There is no better or more intact example in England of a traditional wet-finishing works. Conservation and reuse of these important historic buildings will bring new jobs to Wellington and will provide an exciting visitor attraction. The mill buildings are redundant and at risk and are now the subject of a planning application for conversion. Our project would enable a long-established local business to return to the site and operate the machinery in the traditional way. The Partnership commissioned an Options Appraisal that has evaluated potential heritage-led uses which include providing public access. The Prince's Regeneration Trust continues to work with The Partnership towards its aim of acquiring the site and is optimistic that a successful heritage project can be delivered.
  13. Its that time of year again, where real life gets in the way of exploring. Luckily I managed to squeeze one in with my scouse explorer friend before my car temporarily packed in. Sandwiched between work parties and seasonal sessions I made the trek to RAF Church Fenton not really knowing what to expect. With just a few images in my head of what I thought was a big grand entrance hall and turned out to be the mess hall. The location itself wasnt worth the drive but the company was and I had a good day. History Opened in 1937, it saw the peak of its activity during the years of the Second World War, when it served within the defence network of fighter bases of the RAF providing protection for the Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield and Humberside industrial regions. During September 1940 it became home to the first RAF "Eagle squadron" of American volunteers being No. 71 Squadron RAF initially with the Brewster Buffalo I for one month before changing to the Hawker Hurricane I. The airfield was also home to both the first all-Canadian and all-Polish squadrons, with No. 242 Squadron RAF for the Canadians and No. 306 Squadron RAF for the Polish. As technologies evolved, the first night fighter Operational Training Unit (No. 54 OTU) was formed at Church Fenton in 1940 and stayed until 1942. Some of the squadrons stationed there flew the famous de Havilland Mosquito. On 25 March 2013 it was announced that Church Fenton would close by the end of 2013. The units would be relocated to RAF Linton on Ouse by 31 December 2013.[36] By 19 December 2013, all units had relocated and the airfield was closed. Some equipment will be relocated to RAF Topcliffe. MoD security continued to secure the site until disposal. A NOTAM was issued suspending the air traffic zone (ATZ) at the end of 2013.
  14. Hello! Been abit lazy with uploading explores so heres another one from 2016. Another rooftop (when it was much easier with less Youtube Goons) Anyways, noticed the scaffold up the side of the building, so after a late shift at work i headed into London for a solo explore. Small roof but the view was awesome OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by OPD by Thanks for looking in DJ
  15. Driving to Ruthin for work noticed a builoding in the trees Build in bad shapeLoads of Shoes aroundMilk of Magnesia bottleafter a bit of a clean
  16. All, Not sure if this should go in here as it was nearly 3 years ago now? Please feel free to move it if need be. At the time there was scaffold up at the building side as it was closed due to refurbishment. Some info from the internet: Hayward Gallery is one of the world’s leading contemporary art galleries. Since it opened in the summer of 1968 with an exhibition by Henri Matisse, Hayward Gallery has played a crucial role in presenting work by some of the world’s most significant artists. Between September 2015 and 24 January 2018, the gallery was closed for a two-year refurbishment project to restore our iconic 1960s arts venues to a world-class standard. The focus of the refurbishment project in Hayward Gallery was to restore its 66 glass pyramid rooflights in order to let controlled natural lighting into the upper galleries for the first time, transforming the experience of the hundreds of thousands of visitors we welcome every year. The stone floors of the gallery have also been replaced, the iconic sculpture terraces have been repaved and new climate control and other essential building services have been installed to ensure that Hayward Gallery can continue to present its programme of world-class exhibitions. So myself, Sweetpea and @Letchbo found ourselves climbing our way up to the top. The roof isnt that high so we were in view of passers-by and people waiting up the bus stop so had to be quick. We grabbed afew photos and watched the Southbank security milling around down below unaware us 3 were on the roof Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Hayward by Cheers for looking DJ
  17. Pendleton House salford very easy to get into not much to see not much to add to previous postings
  18. The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though! Thanks for looking
  19. History Agecroft was a coal fired power station which was directly fed by Agecroft Colliery located across the road. The power station consisted of 3 stations. A was opened in 1925 and had 4 Metropolitan Vickers generators putting out 57,500Kw. A video of the opening in 1925 https://www.youtube.com/embed/U6DeR6gj3Nc In 60’s the station was extended, and stations B and C were added along with another 4 generators and 4 natural draft cooling towers. Upping the stations output by 358MW these both opened in 1962. Video from 1962. https://www.youtube.com/embed/hFBSyudgfgM Phone shot of a CEGB sign we found the remains of in A matching that in the video above. Being constructed in 1924 Aerial shot of A in full swing Looking at the station from Agecroft bridge Metrovick Turbo Alternator in Agecroft A Agecroft B and C, dates unknown Agecroft B turbine hall in 1962 The updated control room for B and C in 1962 During use the station had 3 steam loco’s built in 1948 by Robert Stephenson and Hawthorns in Newcastle to shunt coal from the colliery between the stations. With the nationalisation of the UK electric industry a conveyor belt was built instead making the loco’s all but redundant. The loco’s were sold in the 80’s and Agecroft No1 can be seen at the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester. In 1991 Agecroft Colliery closed in March and 18 months later it was announced the power station would close in March 1993. The demolition of the cooling towers was delayed until May 1994 due to a pair of Peregrine Falcons nesting in them. The cooling towers being demo’d in 94. This is the view and a memory I had as a kid watching the demolition from the opposite bank of the Irwell in Prestwich Clough. I think the disappearance of these from the skyline I grew up seeing is probably why I get a proper woody for cooling towers. Anyway here’s a video of them being demolished. (skip to 1:05) https://www.youtube.com/embed/mS6OxiFIyeE https://www.youtube.com/embed/iL3Nns3MIeM The site was bulldozed and HMP Forest Bank was built on the site, which opened in January 2000. The Explore Now as I mentioned above I grew up a mile or two away from Agecroft and I remember going on bike rides with my old man down the clough along the banks of the Irwell seeing the cooling towers, and sadly watching them be demolished (which at the time was bloody epic) obviously now they’re quite a rare sight, especially round here. So yeah I’m rambling. Anyway basically I’ve always driven past the old site and never really given too much thought to it as there only seems to be a couple of buildings left at the front which as far as I can remember have always been offices. Well driving past a few weeks back I saw a couple of the usual security signs up and thought eh up. That has to be worth a nosey. Worth a nosey it was. With a day free I gave @bolts and @ferret a call and off we went. Now we didn’t know what to expect, maybe there was epic, maybe there was stripped out modernised offices, but you don’t know until you look. Turns out the buildings up front which were ITab are now a school. Rammed with kids of all ages playing out near where we wanted to go, but we persevered and cracked on with the task at hand. We managed to get down between a couple of buildings, and noticed some large cable runs. Similar to that of what’s left at Winnington. A few risks later and a massive shout out to @bolts for having some balls and to push us we were in the main building. After checking this out we moved onto the adjoining outbuilding where we stumbled across the control room. WIN. We checked also out a few outbuildings what I think was a pumphouse at one point which is now just empty, another small outbuilding going underground but that's flooded, and then the offices at the front which I believe were used as the CEGB training school in the 60's is now being used as a Jewish school. Where the old turbine hall for A was there is a 60's ish brick office block which was modernised inside and empty. Still a bloody top find and a great day out. Pics My photo’s are a mix of phone and DSLR So this is the first building we got into. 1st floor (phone) Main building Onto the control room. Peace out
  20. Originally the Sea View Hotel, Cautley House is in every way as bland and and tacky as I expected. Built in 1888, it was extended to the east in 1906, became the Seabrook Hotel in the 1960s, Alfred’s Hotel in the 1980s and then a christian healing centre in around 1994. A care home was next on the agenda once the healing centre closed in 2011/12, it didn’t happen though as the building needed updating and was deemed unfit for such use. So it’s just sat empty since, although there used to be a live-in guardian person, but with the disuse and the decay commencing over a number of years they left too. Now plans are in for demolition it’s days as any kind of establishment are numbered, probably to be replaced by the non-affordable homes that keep springing up round here. And despite being accessible in some way or another most of that time it’s pretty untrashed apart from naturally falling apart. Some history and old pics here Entrance/reception area/groud floor rooms Later extension housing the dance floor and DJ booth/sacrificial altar with added air con Main stairs up to the locally-named suites All the rooms were equally as meh, so much shades of beige in this place with 70s style avocado bathroom suites too. And balcony cat-flaps. The most fucked part was the 1906 extension Some signage and stuff There you have it, worth an hour or so if you're in the area
  21. Swan Meadow Mill was built by James Eckersley in 1827 and became Old Mill when a new, larger mill was built in 1838. It was demolished in 1960 followed in 1963 by the larger mill. James Eckersley and Sons had three four-storey mills by 1880.Musgraves of Bolton supplied a tandem compound steam engine in 1884.Eckersleys ran six spinning mills and two weaving sheds in the town, Swan Meadow Old, Swan Meadow large, Water Heyes, and Western Mills No.1, No.2 and No.3. The mills housed a total of 236,572 ring spindles, 14,554 mule spindles and 1687 loom. It's a massive complex and there just seems to be mills everywhere here. Deffo loads more to see and more look disused. We just ran out of time to check the rest out. Visited with @Ferret The damp derpier mills most recent use looks to have been a motorbike\scooter garage. The larger mill was used as a multi level go kart track and then more recently airsoft and paintball. Not a bad mill to be fair. Had a good laugh messing about on a kids go kart. The engine house is a B E A UT.
  22. After seeing Mookster's report of this site a couple of weeks ago; and it being fairly local, I decided I would check it out on my days off work. A friend of mine on Facebook whom I know through other hobbies had expressed interest in an explore with me the day before I had planned to go; so we decided that I would pick him up in the morning and we would go for the hour drive to the location. It was nice to put another face to a name who I'd spoken to for quite some time. The weather that morning had been pretty bad through and through and was forecast to only get worse, but thankfully the rain stopped; and we had a reasonable few hours of weather as we went inside the Abattoir. I had mixed feelings overall about going into the site, nothing eerie or spooky of course, I'm not a YouTuber; but of the side of meat consumption which I always try to forget about. It was pretty cold inside as expected and clinical. I'm not sure I would have wanted to work here. The site is very big and took quite a few hours to do. It was largely trashed and stripped, but the offices really redeemed the devastation downstairs and were stuffed full of things to pick and rifle through. After a very pleasant explore, we walked through the abandoned Garden Centre next door back to my car and stopped off for lunch at a Buddies USA Diner near the M1. Those of you who know me, will know what a carnivore I am, and though I wasn't particularly freaked out by the Abattoir; I certainly had a funny feeling going round in the back of my mind while eating my tasty Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich. Anglo Beef Processors, (ABP) is one of the largest meat processing companies in Europe. During the mid-2000s, production was scaled back and this site and the similar but much smaller facility in Bathgate, Scotland were closed. The facility opened under ownership of Meade Buswell in the 1960s and became Buswells of Blisworth. After a takeover in the 1970s, it became Dalgety Buswell. Later on, it came under the Anglo Beef Processors umbrella before it closure in 2004. Olleco, a cooking oil collection and recycling company operate out of a directly adjacent facility and are an associated company to ABP, which makes sense really as the facility was full of discarded oil drums, catering containers and other plastic barrels. The site was a maze of walk in fridges and freezers, and it was quite easy to get lost in them while navigating your way around. Strangely, and luckily, the site was devoid largely of crappy tags, but the natives had inevitably had their way with some of the things inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 As always guys, thanks for taking the time to read. More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706479202211
  23. History Beehive cotton spinning mills, comprising 2 spinning blocks with some ancillary buildings. The first mill (spinning mill No.1) was built in 1895, the second (spinning mill No.2) added in 1902. 2 spinning blocks with original offices and gate lodge, and later (c1920) office. Spinning mill No.1 is 5 storeys, with multi-ridge roof and cast-iron, steel and concrete internal structure. Brick externally. Large rectangular windows have central dividing mullions. Yellow brick bands as lintels. Stair/sprinkler tower at south-east angle raised an additional storey with high parapet. Stepped pyramidal cap now missing. Mill No.2 is similar in style, 6 storeys. Stair/sprinkler tower similar in style to that of mill No.1 at south-east angle, and additional smaller tower at north-west angle. Spinning mills are linked by loading bay, with mill name and date (1902). Engine house projects from the rear of mill No.1, and there is also a boiler house and truncated stack to rear. Several bays of single-storey, saw-tooth roofed building at front of mill No.2 - preparation or carding areas. INTERIOR: not inspected. HISTORY: documentary evidence suggests mill No.2 also formerly had engine house to centre-rear, and that there were card-room extensions to the rear of mill No.1. Explore Visited with @Ferret and @Drew howe good end to a good day having finally done St Joes earlier in the day. Just a good chilled mooch around a mahoosive set of mills, rooftop chills, winding scallies up, nearly falling into water tanks.
  24. my visit April 2019. Maes Mynan Hall Maes Mynan care home was a two floor 33 bedroom care home on a site of 2.6 acres. The care home was for the elderly and it had its own day service and its own respite service for a short stay and emergency placements. The site was bought in 2013 by the healthcare company and has been left untouched since. The building itself we could not find much history about or anything about when the care home opened. The site itself was in pretty good condition, well worth the visit if you have any free time. Be mindful if you do visit as just at the back of the site, there is a house that is occupied. and theres a lorry tipper comany thats drives past quite offen. Medication trolleyOld stand aidscrapping outlamps and flowerstea cups all ready for the next stage in lifeDinning Room old table and chairepquiptment left Hoist Scales LightingChemicals LeftAnother Medication Cabinet, used in every other home i work in, loads of air flow boxed and other bitsblood viles and and old temp gageControlled Drugs Books and loads of unused blood needle on the floor
  25. History The Art Deco cinema was designed for the Union Cinema Circuit by renowned architects Verity and Beverley. It opened on 23rd July 1937 but was shortly taken over by ABC (Associated British Cinemas) in October that year. It became a Ritz in the 60’s and was used as a cinema up until it’s closure on 18th June 1984 when it was taken over as a bingo hall until that then closed in 2008. Grade II listed due to it’s highly decorative interior of an Art Deco, Neo-Egyptian and Chinoiserie inspired decoration. Which of very few survive now. Here’s a pretty cool video I’ve linked from Youtube with some cracking old images of the place along with a recording of the Compton Organ being played there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-Ej2LEqDEQ Our Visit I’d seen @AndyK and @Spidermonkey had been here a few weeks back, followed by @dweebs report also, so with the 28 meet being in Brum it was the perfect opportunity to get over and have a look. Pretty straight forward as it seems it had quite a bit of traffic earlier in the week to which I noticed the lights were on. Which is ideal as it’s a pain in the arse light painting these massive auditoriums. Visited with @ferret, @drew howe and @slayaaa. Not too much left from it’s cinema days but still a good un non the less. Pics I’ve included a couple of old photos dragged up from Google and a couple of screengrabs of the above mentioned video for comparison. Starting with some externals Foyer Moving onto the auditorium Some old graffiti behind the stage/screen area A lot of money for it’s day this, and still now to be fair. I certainly wouldn’t mind winning that. Original seating, covered in cobwebs. and to finish on “The shot”
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