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  1. Only a few quick shots, taken without a tripod. I don't know when the chapel (called "Capel Zinc") was built, it was a subsidiary tabernacle for the now Holy Trinity Church in Corris. Chairs has been removed and apparently the property is now used by a flower grower. Visited with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4
  2. This was an old explore from 2012 , the church and school closed in 1977 and Im not sure if its still empty or has been redeveloped
  3. History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  4. I was passing here today on way home from work so called in to have a look ...Quite a nice little explore ☺️
  5. History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  6. Found a few more of St.Ebbas, nice to see these again, lots peeling paint and random bricks coming through doors lol:- Enjoy Just found this pic and I luv it lol:-
  7. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  8. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  9. Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Diolch am edrych eto
  10. This church had been on my bucket list for a while and I finally got access, granted it happened last year. I don't know a lot of the history of the church, other than the congregation was founded by German immigrats in the 1800s. The origional church burned in the Chicago fire and a new one was constructed in 1904. In the 1910s Polish immigrants moved in and the German congregation declined in membership. It bounced back and years later in the 50s a large Puerto Rican population came in and spanish masses were offered for the first time. Membership throughout the 60s and 70s etc kept declining and in 1990 the church officially closed. The rectory, convent and school were all torn down. As for the chruch a development company owns it and want's to turn it into luxury condos and a music school.
  11. History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  12. This made up part of an epic road trip back in September 2011. Haven't been on a UK one like this in a while! Who's up for one?! It was called the Dirty Stinkin Northern Road Trip I think this place may be demolished now, but it was quite an interesting explore, even if we did get thrown out before we explored the top floor. Least the security fella was a top bloke! Gave me his badge! haha
  13. The history of Coalbrookdale foundry dates back all the way to 1572 when the land was passed to John Brooke who developed coal mining there on a substantial scale. A blast furnace was built at the site to produce iron, which blew up in 1703. It remained derelict until the arrival of Abraham Darby I in 1709. Abraham Darby I set about rebuilding the Coalbrookdale Furnace, using coke as the fuel. His business was that of an iron founder, making cast iron pots and other goods, an activity in which he was particularly successful because of his patented foundry method, which enabled him to produce cheaper pots than his rivals. The furnace was the first coke-fired blast furnace to operate successfully for a prolonged period of time. The Coalbrookdale Foundry – this area has since been converted into a museum Following the death of Abraham Darby II, Abraham Darby II was brought into the business as an assistant manager when old enough. The Company also became early suppliers of steam engine cylinders in this period. Experiments took place with the application of coke pig iron to the production of bar iron in charcoal finery forges. This proved to be a success, and led to the beginning of a great expansion in coke iron making. In 1768, the company began to produce the first cast iron rails for railways. In 1778, Abraham Darby III undertook the building of the world’s first cast iron bridge, the iconic Iron Bridge, opened in 1780. The fame of this bridge leads many people today to associate the Industrial Revolution with the neighbouring village of Ironbridge, but in fact most of the work was done at Coalbrookdale, as there was no settlement at Ironbridge in the eighteenth century. Workers boots hung on the front gate The blast furnaces were closed down, perhaps as early as the 1820s, but the foundries remained in use. The Coalbrookdale Company became part of an alliance of iron founding companies who were absorbed by Allied Iron founders Limited in 1929. This was in turn taken over by Glynwed which has since become Aga Foodservice. Castings for Aga Rayburn cookers were produced at Coalbrookdale until its closure in November 2017. Delivery yard, where the raw materials and scrap iron arrive One of the two cupolas, seen from the melt shop delivery yard Archive image of molten iron being taken from the cupola Number 1 cupola. This mini blast furnace melted the iron ready to be cast. Number 2 furnace Above the furnaces Compressors which blew air into the cupolas Rear of the furnaces Ladles hanging from an overhead rail system for transporting molten iron One of the ladles Moving into the casting area where we find racks of moulds Patterns laid out on the floor Patterns laid out on the floor The main casting shop contains a fair bit of automated casting equipment Beside the production line with wagons on rails for transporting castings Casting production line Casting production line End of the casting line Casting machine, where the molten iron is pored into Archive image of molten iron being poured into cast Automated production lines Automated production lines Tanks and conveyors Towards the end of the factory we find more machinery Forklift trucks Cherry picker Extraction hoods in an old part of the site The workshops shop contained a handful of machines Dress in the machine shop A pair of drills More drill-presses Finally, some of their finished products – an Aga in the canteen along with a Rangemaster fridge
  14. I have visited here many times now, and i put a premature report up from the first night without exploring too much. So here is a round up of each explore with a sh*t tonne of photos thrown in for good measure. Visit 1 - Night of closure; Totally drunk off our success at Redcar Blast furnace the week before, myself and Raz decided to push our luck and go for our second high profile explore. So as the Hargreaves trucks i service at work pulled out of the gates for the last time, we made our way along the canal. Once we reached our agreed point of entry, we noted that things on the site were far from quiet. With trucks, diggers and dumpers still milling around clearly away the black stuff we crawled (litterally) all the way from the perimeter fence to the closest of the conveyors, and up to the top to scout it out. Quickly we realised this conveyor didnt go very far, and with that in mind we descended to the bottom ready for another labourious crawl. As luck was on our side we had a small window in which to leg it to the next conveyor. Excellect we thought, easy from here. NAHHHHH... the ladders to reach the conveyor were in direct sight of around 7 or 8 diggers moving coal away, and to make things just that little bit more difficult, when we spotted a small alley way in which we could run across the open space, a train rolled in and stopped blocking us completely. Now what? So we waited for around an hour, thinking that the guys in the diggers would go on their breaks sooner rather than later. Again, no. So when we decided it was make or break time, Raz inched closer to the ladders and went for it. 30 seconds later he was at the top. My turn... with my heart in my mouth, i watched the dumper make its way towards me, and then after what seemed like an age, passed me. Scurrying over the heap of coal i was off, up the ladders and on reaching the top threw myself over the edge and into the relitive safety of the conveyor. I took a moment then to catch my breath and stop myself going into a cardiac arrest. Along the conveyor we walked, passing over the diggers still working away, unaware of us. Through a very dark slippy conveyor and into the sorting plant above the train. Now we came across a conveyor belt which was moving, dragging up coal fresh from the seam that day. The last of the coal ever to be pulled from the seam in fact. I was mesmorised. So much so that neither myself or Raz heard the worker who walked down the belt towards us. "What are you doing lads?" "Just taking some photos, that okay?" "I dont really give a f*ck" Time for offskies, and im glad we did because a few minutes later alrms every where and a voice over the intercom telling workers to be on the look out for 2 lads with cameras. A good start, but we'll be back. Visit 2; As is expected we were back within weeks, this time, with The Amatuer Wanderer. Having done the rest of the Redcar SSI sites in the meantime, we were now a lot more confident about high profile places, and by now we were itching to get back at it. So the same way in, but this time now diggers or workers, just a lot more water and mud to contend with. I can deal with that. So this time we managed everywhere other than the headstock, and what an explore it was. lights still on in the bath house and the coolest search yourself sign ever Visit 3; This time with Raz, Butters and Jord (really taking the piss with 4 of us lmfao) we beelined straight for the headstock. No messing around, just up it and thats it. I think that out of all of the colliery this is by far the best part. With some futuristic looking headgear controls and several massive wheels it made my day. So thats it. We've covered the vast majority of the site, so an end to our explores here really... but on a more serious note, it is the end of an era, especially for us Yorkshire folk who's families and friends have been closely linked to the pits for their whole lives. My Father worked down Sharlston pit, My Uncle down Hatfield in its day and one by one they were sealed up and shut down. When it was Big K's time, there were high emotions in the surrounding towns, and a march was organised in nearby Knottingley to give her a send off she deserved. I felt like we had to give her a send of of our own, by documenting the last days of our iconic history. Kellingley Colliery (Big K) 1965 - 1984 / 1984 - 2015 Thanks for looking
  15. Walkergate Hospital in Newcastle opened in the 1880's, it was originally a hospital for infectious diseases. During the First World War injured soldiers who were sent home were temporarily housed in the two pavilions at the east end of the site, these were demolished in 1979. In the Second World War the hospital fell victim to bombing. In more recent years the hospital had an ENT department, x-ray and a small theatre.. Various parts of the hospital closed over the years, with the announcement that the final two wards, that provided longer term palliative care for patients with chronic conditions and shorter term respite care, would close during the summer of 2011. The demo was already well underway when we visited. On with some pics Externals Internals
  16. Without even realizing this place had shut down in 2012 and with the odd few hazy memories from back in my college days, I woke up to a tip off that this place was now accessible. Gathering every detail I could and messaging the usual local explorers, myself and Tiny Urban Exploration were at the site the very same day. After a slightly amusing issue with some totally unrelated security for the adjacent building, we were in the grounds and through a huge hole punched in the walls by the main dance floor by recent demolition works. Nothing much is left of either of the clubs other than the DJ stand and the bars, however there was surprisingly equipment left sitting around the site everywhere with the famous Dukes money littered everywhere. Even the dance floors themselves have been ripped up. We were pleasantly surprised to find some apartments at the front of the building which were still full of the previous occupants belongings. Slightly more bizarrely though; letters dating back to the 1980’s and written in German too! Not what we were expecting to find at a nightclub at all but certainly an awesome find, especially to pre-date the club itself. Many locals know the history of Dukes Genesis but here’s the history on the place, based on memory and information pieced together from various news articles. Enough of the reading now, onto the pictures. I took a lot of snaps at this place so here's my favourite ones anyway...
  17. Been holding off posting this for a while but thought I would share it now... Known about this place since I was a kid and was always intrigued in seeing the inside, you could even say this is what sparked my interest in urban exploration. So after many years of wonder, many hours of research, a lot of head scratching along with the odd bump to the head we found our entrance inside the bunker! I am not going into details of our entry as we would rather not see this place trashed, however once we were inside the bunker was in fantastic condition… all-be-it empty of any contents other than generators. We were also surprised to see the power still on in the majority of the bunker. After an hour or so wondering the coridoors heading back and forth through the bunker, curiosity got the better of us and we ventured up the staircase at one end of the coridoor which emerged to ground level inside Sovereign House. After the odd few moments of exploring we jumped at the sound of a loud beep, fearing this may well be our warning to leave we made our way back to the exit, just as alarms began to sound. Most of you probally already know the history of this place and I suspect a lot of you looking this up will be local to Hertford, but here’s some history on the the bunker shamelessly pinched off the interwebs. Also as the majority of the place had already been void of it’s contents I decided to shoot on video instead.
  18. Premier inn Manchester Visited with @GK-WAX and @vulex we was after a little get together so decided on a nice relaxed evening chilling on the Manchester skyline. After a very hot day was good to unwind and take in Liverpool he view and watch the world go by below us. DSC_3169 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3172 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3175 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3165 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3152 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3150 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3134 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3117 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3187 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3184 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3183 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3180 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3182 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3121 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3135 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3138 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3148 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3153 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3157 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3161 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3162 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3164 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3176 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  19. First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  20. This was a full fun visit and a lovely tricky one to get in to. History Brogyntyn Hall was constructed in 1975. It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the houses of the gentry in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family, Lord Harlech. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  21. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  22. This former school swimming pool was built in 1904 and abandoned in 1997. I happened upon it randomly and had a hunch that there might be a swimming pool inside but didn't expect much given the state of the exterior. Well, it turned out to be pretty decent inside. Clearly nobody has been inside here for a very long time. The pigeons have set up shop and went absolutely bonkers when they saw me. They've really done a number on the place, or should I say a number two? It's pretty minging to be honest but at least there's no shitty graffiti or vandalism. This was a night visit so I had to light paint all my shots. I didn't do too badly considering but it would be cool to see it in daylight. Hopefully someone else will have a look soon. This long curtain covered spectator seating for some reason The floor up here was well dodgy, you can just about see some holes on the left of shot Cheers for looking
  23. Was working in the area and thought it would be rude not to nip in here as its not everyday you get to explore while working so a lone visit after some dodgy balancing act on a tree across what felt like a torrential stream ha ha , just nerves i guess ,hope you like Leri / Lerry Mills, situated at the confluence of the Ceulan and Leri rivers produced Tweed for suit making using both water wheels from the river and workers to power the looms and spinning machinery. Little history can be found about the mills but they were built on the site of an old furnace which smelted the lead from local lead mines. Records date this back to 1642. The mill itself stopped meaningful production around 1958-60 in-line with when the UK became a net cotton importer and the general demise of the industry put paid to over 800 mills. At this time the two mills (the one photographed here is further down the riverbank) were purchased by Mr J Hughes – he ran the mills with his wife till the end of 1980 as a popular tourist attraction. In the August of 1981 they put the whole site, including a 6 bedroom house, the two tweed mills, a craft shop and 14 acres of land around the river bank with shooting & fishing rights, for sale at a guide price £150’000. The site appears never to have been sold and has gradually fallen into decay since
  24. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  25. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
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