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  1. I remember this being a real nice explore except for loads of pigeon shite everywhere
  2. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  3. Back in July, myself and @mookster revisited a site which we both explored back in May 2010 where we piloted my beloved 1978 Land Rover Series III to leafy Surrey. It was a roasting hot day and as an explorer of a year and a bit, it was an exciting huge factory explore which we spent hours in. Fast forward well over eight years and we decide to try a few sites around Surrey and London and head here for a revisit. A lot had happened here in eight years; all documented on crappy YouTube videos and various visits over the year, the site had been torn apart, once secured with guards, fences erected and just pillaged for its innards. I'd heard about being a muddy swamp inside in the rain; hardly suprising as it was a cat litter factory producing cat litter mined from Fullers Earth from a quarry on the same site. We arrived on site in a similarly ancient car; my 1988 Volvo 240 GLT on a much hotter day; quite a roasting day. Perfect exploring weather. The years had not been good; it was battered, beaten and stripped beyond recognition; not suprising seeing as it shut in 1994. I did not recognise this place at all. But it kind of had a charm in the summer sun, it looked like the sort of factory you'd explore on GTA Free Roam, or Driver and find Tommy Vermicelli hiding!! Good to see it again for nostalgia in any case. We spent an hour ish here before moving on to London where we ended up sitting in traffic for ages and going to a very tasty place which served bowls of meat gravy with a burger to bathe in it. Very good it was too! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157673570696148
  4. This church was the reason why I wanted to go to Wales during my last trip to the UK. Thanks @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope for visiting this place with me. History (taken from The_Raw) Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  5. History Maes Mynan care home was a two floor 33 bedroom care home on a site of 2.6 acres. The care home was for the elderly and it had its own day service and its own respite service for a short stay and emergency placements. The site was bought in 2013 by the healthcare company and has been left untouched since. The building itself we could not find much history about or anything about when the care home opened. Our Visit We decided to visit this place when we went out on a day trip to Engedi chapel (report will be up soon). On the way back we still had a lot of daylight left so we thought we would stop in and have a look at this site after seeing a report. The surrounding area was very overgrown and there was a long pathway leading up to the build. The site itself was in pretty good condition, well worth the visit if you have any free time. Be mindful if you do visit as just at the back of the site, there is a house that we assumed is occupied.
  6. The school occupies what used to be the Lillesden Estate Mansion, built at the estate (south of Hawkhurst) in 1855 by the banker Edward Loyd, who moved there after marrying. The house and estate remained in the family until just after the First World War, when it was then sold and eventually became the Bedgebury Girls Public School. The school closed in 1999
  7. The main Hartwood Hospital building block with central towers with side wings was designed and built from 1890 by the local architect J L Murray from Biggar as the Lanark District Asylum covering the Lanarkshire area. The hospital closed in 1999
  8. I was out for a solo exploring day earlier in the year and I decided to head for a mooch around bentwters just to see what I could find what was different to the tour they show people.i actually found quite a bit.it was areally enjoyable to look around.a lot of the place is used as an industrial estate,and its nice to see it being put to use.there is active security there too who drive about..RAF Bentwaters was a former world war two base built in 1942 and was in use by the RAF till 1949 it was then taken over by the Americans who used it till 1993.it had a twin base up the road called RAF Woodbridge.several squadrons were based here over the years.the last being the infamous tank busters the A-10.it was also famous for the Rendlesham forest incident were servicemen from Woddbridge in 1980 saw flashing lights in the sky.it was classed as Britain's Roswell incident.funny most ufo sightings seem to be near American bases THE PLANES On the base is several old planes and helicoptors.a company does these up and sells them.not sure if the company exists still.as the same planes are still there in old photos I have seen online.they were cool to shoot though.my favourite being the two seater black navy harrier. SPECIAL WEAPOS STORES The special weapons storage area is situated behind the regular bomb stores.the regular ones are in use by a company.you know whe you go this area they held some pretty special stuff in here.there was prob nuke heads.CND always descended on Greenham common but in reality I think a lot of the American bases stored nukes.the stores are surrounded by several fence and barb wire and razor wire on top.you enter via a large double gate.once in the gate area number one gate would close and you would be trapped between two.you would then be authorized and allowed in.there is a tower above the gate house with machine gun apertures in there over looking he gate area.further in is a watch tower.and down the other end is a block,this looks like a garage but behind the shutter would be a Humme ready to ride out if under attack.the building also had machine gun apertures fscing in direct line down the main stores.also lots of telegraph poles were dotted around the compound,if Russian helicoptors carrying spetsnaz special forces were to try and land the poles would slow that down.these were serious times in the cold war SITE SECURITY With a base this size security was heavy,i managed to get in the police block,but the dog section was well sealed sadly. THE STAR WARS BUILDING To the rear of the site sit this building what is nicknamed the star wars building.this is because of basically the huge concrete shaped blast walls that surround it.the building itself is basically a block building.this was for the pilots.situated near the pens it was used for debriefing and briefing the pilots and there was toillets and showers and locker rooms,even a small medical room.i learnt after it is hired out now and again. THE VEICHLES Dotted around the airfield is several trucks.some real nice examples on here.shame they are in a state DEPUTY COMMANDER OPERATIONS This block when I looked through the windows looked so good.i was struggling to find a way in and nearly gave up.then I found a small gap and I was in.its one of the most decayed buildings I have been in.you could almost feel the damp and smell it in here.the deputy commander was in charge of being in contact and organisation of operatiox with other countries so basically he would work closely with there NATO aliies.there is a bunker building next door sadly that was a no go. RANDOM AIRFIELD STUFF This was the rules board for civilians visiting around the runway and taxiway areas. At either end of the airfield is a pair of buildings.these would act as a safety line if planes were in trouble.a cable would be pulled up to stop the planes over shooting the runway if they suffered some sort of problem.in the roomy you can still see the hole in the wall and plinth for whatever mechanism was used. nother watch tower to overlook the airfield.this one is in a right dilapidated state. Two of many hangars around the back end of the airfield.most of these had the squadrons insignia on the door
  9. History Margaret Beaven School is a grade II-listed building that was built in 1885 and was designed by Francis Doyle. The house was originally called Eddesbury, it was supposedly the last sustainable Victorian house that was built in West Derby. It was once occupied by Danson Cunningham a friend of Margaret Beaven who was Liverpool's first woman lord mayor. Since the school shut down 13 years ago, the building has been used for filming purposes. It was reported that in May 2018, there was a large fire that ripped throughout the building, we don't know which parts of the building have been damaged as we have not been back since. Our Visit After driving past this place a few times previous to our visit, we decided to have a look online to see if anyone had visited the site before us and unfortunately we came up empty-handed. After realizing this, we took it upon our selves to go down and try gain access, it took us 3 visits before we finally found an entry point. The access point was hard to get through as it was awkward and a tight squeeze. The front part of the building is boarded up and is alarmed, we did manage to gain access but the alarm was unbearable so we decided to just leave it. Once we left, we hung around to see if someone would show up and they did. Overall, the explore was well worth it even though we didn't stay to get pictures of the main building.
  10. Along the road in the Yorkshire dales we came across many small caves. We ventured into some of them, and saw some cool things. Next year we plan on returning and Exploring the larger caves.
  11. Found our way into a small cave in the Yorkshire dales.
  12. As part of another backlog of our West Country Trip, @Mookster, our American Explorer Friend @cgrizzy and myself traveled to this rather derpy site. It's one of the list but little of interest remains inside; though its quite large, with long concrete voids with some pretty good Graffiti in places. Not much was going on inside; except some kids with a makeshift skate park in the middle who seemed slightly suprised to spot us. There is some really cool shots of nature reclaiming in here; lots growing everywhere and areas have collapsed. The Dries in Wenford were built in the early part of the 20th century (likely post-1907) to serve the local china clay pit at Stannon on Bodmin Moor. China Clay in liquid form was carried in a pipeline from the pit to the settling tanks behind the dries. The dries operated until the final closure in 2002 (aside from a brief closure during WWII). The works were originally built by the Stannon China Clay Company, but were acquired by English China Clays in 1919. The choice of site was heavily influenced by the presence of an existing railway line leading from Wenford Bridge which was originally constructed to carry granite from the nearby De Lank quarries. The dry was built adjacent to the railway line and a large private siding was built to connect to the network. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157701301733375
  13. Visited here in 2010 nice little pumping station on Dartmoor .sorry about the rubbish pictures .The pumping station closed in the 1960's.
  14. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  15. Named Manor Dior due to the vast collection of vintage Dior tights in the upstairs main bedroom. Quite a sight when I opened the wardrobe door and yes I had a good look through them :D Large detached house with quite extensive decay in some rooms yet others were relatively decay free if a little messy. The Dior bedroom was probably the room where the old lady spent her final days in the house, bed ridden judging by the medical items in there and district nurses documents. It appears she outlived her husband by some years and lived there alone. Not sure how long the house has been abandoned for but the decay would suggest some years. All the personal items are still in the house just left behind including stacks of old photographs and school reports from the 1950s which were interesting to read. The lady had children whose reports they were. Other than this I'm not sure of other history. A lovely house none the less one with a bit of TLC would make a great family home again :D
  16. Due to annoying incidents quite well known. Meanwhile, a lot was looted here and destroyed as much by vandalism. Visited May 2018 with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  17. Morning All, I was lucky enough to grab myself a ticket to attend a tour of the 2 closed platforms at Charing Cross station recently A little history: Until the Jubilee line was extended south of the Thames via the Millennium Dome to link with Stratford on the Central line, the Jubilee line originally terminated at Charing Cross. As the new extension was built, a section of tunnelling between Charing Cross and Green Park effectively became a branch line of the new extension. Originally it was intended to run a few special services to Charing Cross, however it was eventually decided to abandon the Jubilee platform there and it was closed on 19th November 1999. Occasionally trains are still routed up the branch but no passengers are allowed to alight since the escalators are now out of service. Since closing, the platform has been stripped of much of its decoration and is now cordoned off to the public. Really enjoyed my time down there, even more enjoyable than Aldwych tbh. Part of James Bond's Skyfall was filmed here, we were told they spent 5 months filming here, just for 10 minutes of footage!! On with my pics 1. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 2. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 3. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 4. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 5. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 6. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 7. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 8. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 9. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 10. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 11. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 12. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr 13. Closed Charing Cross Station Platforms by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for looking DJ
  18. The old abandoned farmhouse - Charnock Richard - Chorley - Feb 2018 One of my favourite explores so far this old abandoned farmhouse was brimming with history and fortunately, we made it just before the bulldozers did. I've seen plenty of footage of this old place on the web and it seems we made it just after the foliage had been pruned lol. A quality explore with quality likeminded people.
  19. On the outskirts of Fishburn lies the derelict Winterton hospital. Winterton hospital used to be very big however most of its buildings were demolished and this part is the only building that remains of it. All of the windows are boarded up however when we got there it looked like someone had pulled the entire doorway off causing the whole thing to open making an entry so easy. Inside the building is in terrible condition, (similar to St. peter's) with collapsed floors, wallpaper peeling, water damage etc. We also didn't realise at the time that the building had asbestos but luckily we had masks so make sure to bring one if you're planning on going inside. We were unable to access the top floor due to the floor being so bad so we only got photos from the corridor as we came up the stairs. That all being said, winterton hospital does have a lot of history and it is a shame to see it left in such a poor state.
  20. History This Octel site in Amlwch was chosen in 1949 to collect bromine from the sea, it was picked by H Fossett and R O Gibson because of the strong tidal flow, the depth of the sea in the area and gulf stream sea temperatures. The plant was built and finished construction in 1952, ready to start collecting the bromine out of the sea. The site was officially owned by Octel until 1989 when the production of bromine chemicals became more important which resulted in Great Lakes purchasing the site due to them specialising in bromine chemistry. In 1995, one of the BOT2’s that was used for collecting bromine chemicals was badly damaged by a fire that occurred on the site. Two of the 30-metre towers were destroyed and around 5 people were injured. Octel bromine works started their operations in 1952 and closed in 2004. Canatxx purchased the site and announced plans to turn the site into a liquid natural gas storage site. Our Visit This is one site that we have kept our eye on for a while, but never got around to visiting. Finally, we decided to pay the site a little visit and we were not disappointed with what it had to offer. We made sure to visit on a sunny, bright day so we could spend as much time as we needed to explore the whole site. It took us a good few hours to explore the whole site but was definitely worth the time and drive there.
  21. History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  22. On the outskirts of Middlesbrough there is an abandoned nursing home in a housing estate. The building was originally constructed in 1825 however it was not fully built until 1858. The use was originally a house however in the 1980s the owner sold the house and converted it into a nursing home. The home closed down in 2005 and has been empty since. Recent arson attempts have occurred at Normanby Hall and the place is well secure and hidden from the housing estate. All of the gardens and road to it are overgrown and makes it almost impossible to even know it is still there! The building is in derelict condition and there are currently no plans as of demolition or refurbishment, which is quite sad considering this is a spectacular looking house. anyway here are the photos, enjoy!
  23. As I was flicking through old files recently i noticed that I'd only processed about half of the pics from here. So I decided it was about bloody time I did - this is the condensed version. If you are interested in reading more about the institution I would recommend reading the info on the attached link, it really is fascinating. https://www.countyasylums.co.uk/st-georges-morpeth/ Notes on my visit - initially I was chuffed to enjoy a stress-free visit as it was known for being a bit of a tricky one. Later that was replaced by bitter disappointment when I got to the most iconic part of the place (the ivy bathrooms). The walls had been completely covered in graffiti possibly as little as a few weeks prior. And I'm talking the most worst kind, no artistic merit whatsoever and no way of editing out in photoshop. Anyway I guess there are plenty of other shots that give a little insight into what it was like. 'Was' being the word as most of the buildings have now been demolished to build housing on the site.
  24. Explored in 2014 ...gutted inside but still beautiful outside
  25. Popped out with the new camera yesterday with two friends. Still getting used to it. :D Went to Hi-Finish Castings in Birmingham. From what I could find out with paperwork inside the land was bought in 1935 at a cost of £12,000. In between 1935 and 1941 the building was built and an inventory took place in July 1941 at a cost of £25,269. Various metals were made for all types of products like wall fittings (Sockets and light fixtures) to car parts(Door handles, wing mirror casing and much more) and they had various clients like Bentley, Ford and Talbot. In the early days also Mitchells and Butler where involved in the company. Was a great relaxed explore and even though the main factory space was empty (It had some gems) the offices were great. The safe in the toilet had some wonderful paperwork in it detailing the history. What a depressing canteen though. Windows on all sides with a view of a brick wall. Some wonderful gems about if you look though. Closed in 2008 I believe with a loss of about 42 jobs. Company is no longer about. Enjoy.
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