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  1. Another explore from a massive backlog of explores! This one is from late January 2018; my first meeting with James Smith, having been talking on Facebook and Urbex Forums for practically ten years! Those who know me, know I have a love for older and retro vehicles. I had taken a drive to Derbyshire to pick up a spare Automatic Gearbox for my 1988 Volvo 240 as it was going cheaply and you never know! After collecting; I decided to give James a bell and he very kindly took me to some local sites! Permanite Asphalt was incorporated in 1989 and later became known as Ruberoid; part of the IKO Group. According to Companies House, they were dissolved on 2 September 2016. The pictured business in Matlock, manufactured Asphalt Products such as roofing sheets. It also involved the mixing of aggregate, bitumen and sand. Powdered limestone – which is still very much apparent, like a thick dust throughout the main tower. This Limestone was mixed with hot bitumen emulsion and poured into moulds before being left to cool. The site was regulated by the local Derbyshire Dales District Council on the following conditions: The heating of tar or bitumen is regulated under section 6.3 of the Environmental Permitting Regulations. The following activities are regulated as Part B processes: Heating, but not distilling, of tar or bitumen in connection with any manufacturing activity, or oxidising bitumen by blowing air through it, at plant where no other activities described in any Section in this Schedule are carried on. The undertaking of the activity must be likely to involve the use in any 12-month period of 5 or more tonnes of tar or bitumen or both in aggregate. Originally, the site was part of the larger Cawdor Quarry complex. It is suggested that the factory closed sometime around 2009 but information is pretty thin on the ground. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157690278494090
  2. Branston Pickle was made at this factory complex we see here in Burton Upon Trent, England 1920 and 1925 under Crosse & Blackwell and Rayon was produced here between 1927 and 1930. The history gets more interesting though; originally conceived and built as the rather grand, National Machine Gun Factory, it was completed in November 1918. Of course; by then, the First World War was over and the factory was obsolete! There was no need for the production of these weapons to begin! So Pickle ended up being made here for a few years! Come The Second World War; a major ordinance facility known as "The Branston Depot" was established here. This closed in 1961 and the operations moved down South to Bicester. Parts of the site were used up to about 1975, and bits have been demolished. Other parts house a B&Q Depot, and a workshop which converts and coach builds Police and Prison Vans. I apologise about the delay on this; it was shot back in New Year! I have been busy as always. The building is pretty bare and most of the cool, retro signage has been stolen. Not that I agree with it, but I suppose its better than it all being inevitably thrown away. The clock was what redeemed this place, and we gave it a wind and set the time. Viola. I bet that confused the locals! It looked as if it had been wound a few times in recent weeks. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157692903424632
  3. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  4. Not a lot about this place, I believe the bowling part shut down in 2009 and then the crystal maze part shut down in 2010. Oakwood own this place and have no plans for it besides letting it rot away. Whoever is trying to look after this place is attempting to keep people out. Heard about this place from a different site, easy to find, such a pain in the arse to get into as there's a very tight gap to try and squeeze through.. Thee maze is bigger than first thought, only uploaded a few pictures of that.
  5. One from the vault. Did a quick search on this one and surprisingly saw very little in the way of reports - so thought I'd share my take on it. Back in the day this place was quite infamous - mostly it seems due to the few 'bad apples' that lurk within the exploring community. Stories of looting and selling out to the media were rife. It is quite a special place for me as its the kind of place that's close to where my ancestors lived and I can imagine its the kind of place they would call home. Its located in a wild and isolated place, it would have been a harsh and bleak landscape to live in at times but in its own way stunning and beautiful. I visited twice in the early part of 2015. The house had obviously been left unoccupied a very long time until it suddenly appeared on the radar. The owners had become aware of this and tried securing it. On my first visit I noticed a big new shiny padlock was in place on the outhouse. When I returned about a month later the whole door had been smashed. A little later all doors and windows were boarded up, leading to an unofficial renaming by one clever wordsmith as Shroud Cottage. It appears that also didn't deter those with no sense of respect in the search for 15 minutes of Facebook fame. Enough of the backstory and on with the pictures:
  6. Say "Saltersgate Inn" on our away weekend and the reading is fascinating https://www.thewhitbyguide.co.uk/the-legend-of-the-saltersgate-inn-part-1/
  7. About 3 months after he fractured his spine, I went down to Nailsworth to visit my friend Oort. After a quick coffee and a catch up, we headed straight to the mine for Oort's first mooch after his accident. Not much online. The early history of these quarries is vague. Presumably quarrying of the fine oolite stone has been carried on at the outcrop since Roman times. Due to the steep hillsides, the overburden soon became too great and thus they went underground. There are a number of small scale developments. According to a 90 year old inhabitant of Nailsworth, a Mr William Mortimer who died in 1970, such places were worked in the winter months by cottagers employed in casual agricultural work during the summer. Graffitti dating 1900-1947 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) Cheers for Looking
  8. A stunning grade two listed gem decaying right on the high street. Featuring the stunning architecture of Alfred Waterhouse who also designed Strangeways prison the Manchester town hall. The main building has been used for many different purposes over the years as well as Prudential themselves. And the basement club was once a Berni inns restaurant (Cafe Monico) a chain that served a post-war British public such delight's as sherry schooners steak and chips and black forest gateau as well as becoming a dance club in the 90's. We had a wonderful two hours in this grade two listed time capsule. Hope you guys enjoy the pics as much as we enjoyed the explore. Thanks for any feedback The Urban Collective We Film It...
  9. Monkton Farleigh Down, Ammunition Tunnel, Wiltshire – December 2017 Moving on through my backlog of explores; to one myself and Mookster visited back in December. It was to be a nice, slow paced Pre-Christmas day of explores; but sadly this was to be the only site we explored that day. Unfortunately my car had developed an exhaust leak that morning and the rest of the day was rather noisy until the vehicle was repaired. The Monkton Farleigh ammunition depot made use of an old stone quarry below a plateau; around 450 feet above the valley floor in which ran the main line railway. This railway was its principal source of supply. Before the depot could be commissioned, an efficient means was required to bring in ammunition from the railway at Farleigh Down Sidings. These sidings were just over a mile from the depot as the crow flies but over four miles by road along pretty heavy going, tortuous country lanes. The tunnel at Monkton Farleigh was designed to handle around 1000 tons of ammunition each day. Completion was not scheduled until 1941. The tunnel to the railway sidings at Shockerwick was a big player in the Monkton Farleigh mine; offering a secure route which in turn, was invisible to aerial reconnaissance. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 As Always everyone, Thanks! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157665020437557
  10. After visiting the site last year, and only making it half way down the 'stairs of death', and all the other entrances completely sealed, we decided to head back and give it another shot.. This time the stairs were even more dangerous, and were completely missing a huge section of steps, that had been completely destroyed. After deciding it a wasn't a great idea to continue further, we decided to see if any of the other entrances were open, and to our surprise we found a way in!! Fresh soil had been put down around the area, and it looked like work had been taking place, so not sure what the future of the bunker is at the moment. There's not a great deal left inside, but the tunnels themselves make for some decent photos!
  11. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  12. Bretton Hall Gymnasium The history A teacher training college founded by Alec Clegg. The collage boasted in the design and the architecture of the veroius 'new' buildings scattered around the collage campus including the Gymnasium and the student centre. The collage merged with the University of Leeds in August 2001. Most of the music, fine art and teacher training courses were moved to the Leeds campus, but visual and performing arts education and creative writing remained at the Bretton site, which became home to the University's School of Performance and Cultural Industries. The Gymnasium also stayed but later became disused. The building now is a showdow of its former glory. The explore Ive always fancied to have a look around this building and never got the chance too... until recently. Its quite an unusual looking building but that said it would make a very nice modern Gym. Entry was fairly easy if you have common sense, and its nice to get out with a new member. Theres not much really else to say about this building... just watch out for the tourist who don't share the same interest as you when it comes to abandonment. The pictures @SILVERSKULL2004 if your still on the forum nice meeting you and a good mooch that... Cheers for reading I know it's a bit of a small one but o'well LBE
  13. Visited on a freezing cold snowy Sunday morning with Scrappy NW and Katy. Long overdue visit this one but access isn't always possible. Inside its dark and decrepit yet enough remains to get an idea of how it looked when it was in full flow. The stage area was a no go as it has now collapsed. Structuraly it was fairly sound even in the upper areas. Things were made to last in 1894 obviously. Theatres have so much history and are always wonderful places to explore and photograph even if their condition is so poor. On with some history. I'm sure you have all read the history of this pace in other reports but i'll put a brief summary here: The Burnley Empire Theatre has a profoundly poignant history that starts in the 19th Century when it was first designed by GB Rawcliffe in 1894. Owned and managed by WC Horner, it was a theatre of high regard and continued to such following works in 1911, when the auditorium was redesigned by Bertie Crewe, well respected architect, much of whose work is no longer standing – pulled down to make way for housing, shops or other amenities, or victims of the war that destroyed so many beautiful buildings. The interior boasts ‘two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts’ . The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. During its time as a theatrical venue, Charlie Chaplin, Margot Fonteyn and Gracie Fields are just a few of the names to have appeared on the now broken stage. In 1938 The Theatre was converted for cinema use by the Architects Lewis and Company of Liverpool, and the seating capacity was reduced to 1,808 in the process. Like so many other Theatres around the Country the Empire was eventually converted for Bingo use in 1970 but even this ceased in 1995 and the Theatre, despite being a Grade II Listed building, has been empty ever since and is in serious decline, and listed as one of the Theatres Trust's buildings at risk. On with the pics
  14. Ida Darwin Hospital, Cambridge, September 2017/Jan 2018 Another year, another one of Landies big backlogs! I first did this site back in September with a non-explorer friend. It was pretty boring overall and the one building which looked any good, turned out to be inaccessible. I later heard the warped door round the back needed a bit of extra tug; but was open! Doh! I kept hold of the photos until I returned in January of this year with another non explorer and went for the more intact building! Sadly upon arrival; we found the nice part of the hospital to be completely trashed! Double Doh! Still, it was a day out and good to be in somewhere. The hospital is partly live, but seems to be closing at a fair rate of knots. Way back in the late 19th century; people with brain injuries and single mothers were referred to as "feeble minded" and local authorities were to provide public asylums to house those deemed to be "pauper lunatics". Fulbourn Asylum was opened in 1858 for the feeble minded people of Cambridge to be kept in as it was considered that those people should be segregated from the rest of society. By the 1960s, the need for provision of dedicated care and support of the mentally handicapped people in the area was noted. The below site was chosen by The East Anglia regional Hospital Board; next to the Fulbourn mental hospital. The then new hospital site catered for 250 residents and the aim was that the facilities would enable each resident to maximise their greatest potential. The hospital was named Ida Darwin and has been slowly closing down over the last couple of years. There was also a weird poo room where someone had turned a table on its side and had been going behind the table turned over. Perhaps someone living rough here. #1 #2 #3 #4 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 As Always, thanks guys! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693924924014
  15. Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  16. Hey, guys here's my video report on the #post-apocalyptic #Camelot #ThemePark. I've already made a photographic report with a full history etc so I won't bore you with that here as it is featured in the footage. Thanks for any feedback guys take it, easy man. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  17. Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  18. Taxal Lodge - Photographic Report - 2018 #TaxelLodge Photographic Report - 11th March 2018 Built-in 1904 Taxal Lodge was once the home of Lt. Col. H. Ramsden Jodrell, Who passed away in 1950. The home became a Special School, for disruptive and emotionally disturbed kids that lived on site 5 days a week. It replaced an older Taxal Lodge that originally stood further up the valley. Over the years there have been various reports of abuse within the school and a lot of visitors and students claim that the lodge is haunted. Once the plug was pulled by the authorities the school was closed in 2005. Since its closure, the lodge fell victim to vandals & arson. Now other nature has now begun to stake her claim... The Urban Collective We Film It...
  19. The old abandoned farmhouse - Charnock Richard - Chorley - Feb 2018 One of my favourite explores so far this old abandoned farmhouse was brimming with history and fortunately, we made it just before the bulldozers did. I've seen plenty of footage of this old place on the web and it seems we made it just after the foliage had been pruned lol. A quality explore with quality likeminded people.
  20. Churchills Pub Bolton - Feb 2018 This week on Bygone Pubs we take a look into the derelict Grade two listed #Churchills #pub in #Bolton #Lancashire Formerly #TheRoseHillTavern. Many a #BoltonWanderers fan will remember a match day at Burnden Park then off to Churchills for a good old pint. Unfortunately, though the memories are all that remains.
  21. Spooky place i used to pass regular Denbigh.... that was it
  22. First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  23. I have found a location close to me in West Yorkshire that has been covered before, the site is nearly completely destroyed but the main barn and some of the out buildings still exist. I enjoyed looking around the site and turning it into a cinematic style video (i hope i aren't hated for it, my last video i posted on here went down well). Let me know what you think of the video.
  24. The Old Sodality Club #Leigh Lanc's This video is the first of my new series #bygonepubs where Il be documenting the steady decline of these wonderful gathering holes as the corporations' franchises and chains etc increase their stamp on society. I've had wonderful feedback from many people since posting this video on "cough cough" Facebook, who've told me many wonderful stories about the place before it was lost to economic decline thank's to the powers that be. I believe the place closed in 2010 ish and was once a popular watering hole for many a denizen. From parties to football to darts and karaoke the place once bustled with the familiar tone's of friendship and alcoholism "Swigs his Guinness". You can almost hear the faint echoes of the past in places like these so I'd like to share my documentation of the place in a video format as I did not get many pics. Thanks for any feedback guys. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  25. CAMELOT - Theme Park - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 This abandoned resort and theme park is located in the English county of Lancashire. The park's theme was based on the well-known story of King Arthur and the Knights of the roundtable After numerous takeovers, the theme park was purchased by Story Group and leased to Knight's Leisure who ran the park. However, it's closure was announced by the operator, in November 2012. In August 2014, an application to build houses on the site was unanimously rejected with 261 public objections. As of Feb 2018, the park stands empty a former shadow of its glory day slowly but surely falling victim to mother nature. A new housing development plan has been submitted, to many a protest from the local residents, However, if it does go through the once magical kingdom of Camelot will be lost forever. We gained entry into the former petting zoo and made our way to the middle of the park where we were caught by 4 security guards and a static full of dogs. Anyway, I hope you can enjoy the pics as its all I was able to get. Any feedback greatly appreciated.
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