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  1. Built circa 1880 for T & J Leigh Cotton & Wool spinning, it had 120,000 spindles in 1914. Twin six storey brick built with an ornamental engine house between. Fireproof construction and cast iron pillars between windows on the top floor. It was Grade II listed in 1975. The building has had it’s various uses over the past few decades. A large section was a furniture shop. A bed and Sofa shop. A gym, joinery workshop. Until recently where it is now currently being stripped to be converted to apartments. Been in here a few times now, when it was open for summer roof chills, and more recently now it’s stripped. I’ll keep checking on it as it’s local and I really want to see the engine house but it seems to be quite secure. Anyway it’s still a grand old mill so here’s a few pictures.
  2. I’d had my eye on this place for years. I’m from Prestwich so only up the road and I remember going past the Rialto further up where there is now a maccies and past this place on our way into town as a kid. I lived in Broughton briefly about 5 years ago and used to keep an eye on it, however it was always well sealed. Visited with @EOA initially and @Host and @CameraShy joined us later. History Built in 1899 by the Broughton Theatres Syndicate Ltd, Victoria Theatre opened in December 1900. Less than a year after opening it was used as a cinema (although sadly there is no signs of cinema use left) Seating was extended from 2,000 upto 3,000 in 1910 and between 1919 and 1919 it was used as a theatre again. It was then used as a cinema again until it closed in 1958 when it was then used as a clothing/furniture store until 1973 when it was an unsuccessful bingo hall, which closed shortly after. It remained closed until the 80s when it opened up as Bingo hall, which it remained until its closure in 2008 under the Palace name. Its Grade II listed and on the theatres at risk register. More info can be found here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Theatre,_Salford http://www.arthurlloyd.co.uk/SalfordTheatres.htm#victoria https://salfordvictoria.co.uk/ Pics Ill start with some old pictures of the theatre taken from google image search or the above websites. and now not too sure on the date of this Now, looking out from the stage Looking down at the stage bad lens flare The upper circle seating area which has been boarded off seating on the dress circle looking down from the dress circle spiderwebs and pigeon shit fill the upper levels. Looking up from the dress circle level to the awesome ceiling. the stalls/stage level more spider webby goodness above one of the boxes next to the stage the back of the curved plaster ceiling above the stage stripped seating in a back room the upper circle boarded off The stage level cheap Down into the basement and underneath eh stage underneath the stage. The wooden levers you can see operated various trapdoors and other stage type thingamabobs. Which is pretty cool. small workshop area Nice tilling Main entrance bingo at its best!
  3. came across an abandoned Garage it apeared to be a farm, but looked closer TYO367S LOTUS ECLAT, Date registered 3 December 1977, First MOT due Unknown Nice JCB A229HRK, LOTUS ECLAT, Date registered 10 April 1984, mot: unknown, G944WVM, VOLKSWAGEN GOLF, Date registered 26 April 1990, First MOT due Unknown K888YAN JEEP CHEROKEE, Date registered 11 June 1993, First MOT due Unknown. G944WVM, VOLKSWAGEN GOLF, Date registered 26 April 1990, First MOT due Unknown
  4. History Tullis Russell was formed in 1809 by Robert Tullis, he acquired Rothes mill in 1836. In 1912 the construction of Markinch Power Station began, to provide the mill with electrical power, rather than power provided from water wheel. The Coal Fired Power Station was completed in 1914, and was fitted with 3 Parsons Units and Rerolle electrical equipment. At some point, I have no definite date, but the power station was extended to take a fourth slightly larger, more modern Parsons unit along with an English Electric system to distribute the power it generated. It was also given an oil fired system to work alongside the coal fired boilers. Sadly, the plant was deemed too dirty after breeching EU emission regulations and was forced to close been replaced by the new biomass plant on site. For a mothballed site though, it's still very much live, all the power is still on and the readouts in the control room as still showing live stats for the power station. It wouldn't take much to raise steam and get her running again! Explore One that i've been meaning to do for a couple of years having seen some seriously epic report on the place it sadly never happened with it being so far away. Big mistake by myself as always, as you will see. Visited with @GK_WAX it was a good day out and good to finally see it. Didn't manage to get any more photo's as we planned to get the boiler house and other bits done on the way out but got collared by a worker in there stripping the turbines We hid behind a switchboard for about 40 minutes with no where to go. The only possible way out was where he came from or back through the small window he was boarding back up. Luckily he was a sound guy and we had a natter about the place before he escorted us out. The metal fairies had been in before Christmas and it seems this has kicked the demo team up the arse to press on. It won't have long left, access was a bit of a faff due to the amount of chomping and concrete rubble blocking everything. Pics A sorry sight to behold indeed
  5. So a few weeks ago, myself and two other explorers; @albino-jay and @ Ferret whom I've known online for many years, but never managed to explore with! We all get round to exploring with one another eventually! This site was previously owned by a firm who were contracted to develop technology for the military, but was eventually sold off to a property developer after its 2011 closure. The site has recently become the Urbex Hotspot for people, so it was good to get it done and dusted before it got too much worse. We really enjoyed ourselves, and despite being fairly stripped out, there was a lot to see here. We spent around 10 hours on site I think!!! Once again, we bumped into about 4 other groups of explorers. I guess this is becoming a thing nowadays in this hobby to be honest! Just gotta face the facts that it is now mainstream... The Royal Radar Establishment; a former Research Centre in Malvern, Worcestershire in the United Kingdom was formed in 1953 as the Radar Research Establishment by the merger of the Air Ministry's Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and the British Army's Radar Research and Development Establishment (RRDE). It new name was given after a visit by Queen Elizabeth II in 1957. Both names were later abbreviated to RRE. In 1976 the Signals Research and Development Establishment (SRDE), involved in communications research, joined the RRE to form the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE). They had been closely associated since before the beginning of World War II, when the predecessor to RRDE was formed as a small group within the Air Ministry's research center in Bawdsey Manor. They were soon forced to leave Bawdsey due to its exposed location on the east coast of England. After several moves, the groups finally settled in separate locations in Malvern beginning in May 1942 with a merger in 1953 that formed the RRE and renamed these as the North Site (RRDE) and the South Site (TRE). In 1991 they were partially privatize, and became Defence Evaluation and Research Agency in 1996. The North Site was closed in 2003 and the work was consolidated at the South Site, while the former North Site was sold off for housing developments. The RSRE is now part of Qinetiq. Some of the most important technologies developed from work at RSRE are radar, thermography, liquid crystal displays and speech synthesis. Contributions to computer science made by the RSRE included ALGOL 68RS (a portable implementation of ALGOL 68, following on from ALGOL 68R developed by RRE), Coral 66, radial basis function networks, hierarchical self-organising networks (deep autoencoders), the VIPER high-integrity microprocessor, the ELLA hardware description language, and the TenDRA C/C++ compiler. The RSRE motto was Ubique Sentio, which is Latin for "I sense everywhere". The site is well explored after its sale to a Private Developer. It is well worth visiting with its mockup of a RADAR Bunker. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 #32 #33 #34 #35 #36 #37 #38 #39 #40 Thanks for Looking More at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704376480512/page1 This was a busy one, so you will have to exit via the Gift Shop I'm afraid!
  6. I have decided not to name this one; it sits in the middle of a large Brand New Housing Estate in a rather affluent part of the UK, not far from London. The reason behind this is because it looks as if its either being converted or used for storage; and tbh I don't think it needs hundreds of people going to it; its situated in the grounds of the Site Office. The Church was part of a huge Convent which I didn't even know existed; and was locally derelict for many, many years, completely unbeknownst to me! It was last used as a church when the complex closed in 2006. Visited with a Non-Explorer friend. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  7. Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  8. have passed this often and today thought lets have a look; it is a former station masters house on the hawarden Loop; a once thriving goods and passenger depot Well that was a waste of 15 mins I must say!!! still here is my wonderous adventure
  9. Another weekend, another backlog! I really need to streamline my reporting process! Part of a little day out with Mookster back before Christmas, we did this Tourist Trail steelworks; and it was a rather nice morning out; albeit a little smashed inside. The works were originally established in 1855 with an office staff of four, three small furnaces, a small foundry; plus iron fields at Stanton and in the neighbourhood parish of Dale Abbey, and the Ironstone Bell pits at Babbington. Messrs George and John Crompton; the three founders; were brothers and partners in the firm of bankers of Crompton and Evans - Mr Newton and Mr. Barber. In the infant years; the pig iron was made entirely from local ore, but in 1865 Northamptonshire ores were introduced into the mixtures; with iron mines in Leceistershire and Northamptonshire acquired and developed. In 1878 the pipe foundry, now potentially the largest in Great Britain, and possibly the world, was started under the management of Mr James Chambers. Circa 1914; the company had 7000 people on its pay roll - 3000 here at Stanton, the same number at the collieries and 1000 at the ironstone mines. In 1951 it was nationalised and became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. A takeover in 1960 by Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd happened. and was merged with Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. to form the Stanton & Staveley company. In 1967 Stanton & Staveley was incorporated into British Steel. During the early 1980s the Stanton site became part of the French Pont-a-Mouson Group and later part of Saint Gobain, manufacturing cast iron pipes. Production finally ceased on May 24th 2007, and subsequently a huge amount of the site was demolished around 2009/2010. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678405612458
  10. Didnt think I would bother doing LLuesty but nowt else to do was quite eerie with the rain and the wind though! Workhouse is well under way with development lots of builders on site and now probly not worth a look
  11. The derelict Miranda’s Church in Yorkshire. After hearing a few people make reference to this place having some features, namely the ceiling which were similar to the ones at Castle Miranda aka Château Noisy I had to check it out. Visited with Andy K of Behind Closed Doors for a relatively local explore. Quite happy with this place the ceiling was pretty stunning and I can see the similarities which people mentioned. The church itself is pretty knackered, not sure what will ultimately happen to the place. The structure could probably be salvaged if someone acted quickly however I expect this one will stand abandoned for sometime and ultimately fall apart. On with the photos: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Higher res copies of the above photos and more on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2015/01/18/urbex-mirandas-church-aka-blue-church-yorkshire-united-kingdom-august-2014/
  12. Clockhouse Brickworks was a Hansons factory built on a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) near Capel in Surrey. The site lies 600m east of the Auclaye SSSI which was also a former brickworks, geologically it lies on wealden clays (Da Fuq?). It is a site for palentological and sedimentological research covering an area of 32.4 hectares. Similar strata are seen at Warnham. The factory was phased out of production during early 2009 due to the downturn in the construction industry, and a lack of housebuilding projects. Since that time it has sat disused exposed to the elements gathering dust. I visited back in April with Sentinel one lazy afternoon and only just got round to sorting out my pics. It's a fantastic location where the workers seemed to have just downed tools and buggered off without so much as a riverdance. The whole place is covered in a film of orange brick dust and feels like it could return to normal service at the flick of a switch. The highlights for me were the old control panels and the workshop which was full of old tools and machinery. Other highlights included Sentinel being attacked by an owl. It's been covered a few times before but hopefully I've added something a bit different - Tits and Arse. The whole place is painted in green and yellow, a strange colour code for such an industrial setting Dust Masks and other protective equipment lie everywhere as if they were only just taken off Old tracks lead from one end of the factory to the other Old Switch Panel Some areas are deep in sludge where the rain has come through Brick making machinery Lockers, some still with bits and pieces left inside by workers The decoy security guy Reflections A worker's hard hat Cap Thousands of bricks left behind never to be used An old vice on a workbench covered with rusty tools One of the many styles of bricks once produced here Funky Control panel Funky Wheelbarrow Peeking outside Strange looking machinery upstairs The main office Looking down on the bricks Somebody planted a tree! The Workshop Safety Boots still in good nick after all this time Giant Anvil Welder's mask and finally....my favourite shot of the day, the staff Room Cheers for looking
  13. March 2019 Situated in picturesque Gog Countryt his former care home for the elderly recently sold at auction for £600k is huge inside with a few bits and bobs; and some alas goontuber tagging a lot has changed since other explorers have been onsite last year
  14. Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
  15. History "Built in 1770 by William Marsden who's daughter married Richard Field who then traded there for a number of years until forming the partnership of Field & Bottrill in the 1880's. Now Dawson Fabrics Ltd. The company name Dawson Fabrics closed the doors at Greenside Mill sometime in the late millennium years with the loss of 70 jobs. Administrators from Leicestershire insolvency were called and are now handling the company affairs. The company was said to be doing well with orders from high street stores such as Marks & Spencer. Dawson Fabrics were making fleecing for jackets and blankets. The company closed it's premises on Wakefield Rd in 2000 with a loss of 60+ jobs to focus on their other sites including Greenside Mill. Outline planning for 149 houses have been submitted with a demolition order which was denied but as recently been re-submitted with agreed amendments." Visited with @EOA and @Ferret bumped into @little_ boy_explores on the way out too. Quite a relaxed one, heard stories of dogs but nothing to be seen. The alarm wasn't on when we went but it was when I popped back. Pot luck with this one I think. It has a bit of everything though so although it's been hammered it's deffo worth a look in. Pics
  16. known to explorers by its nick name! Adwy Deg; the fair retreat Life was hard for Welsh hill farmers; the nearest road to this property is a mile away; The date of the turnpike road newly-constructed between 1777 and 1823 supports the suggestion that the settlement of this central area is principally late 18th century/early 19th century in date. Most of the farmsteads appear to date from this period, almost all of which lie to the west of (and below) the main road, boarded up with sadly time and thieves taking their toll not much left to see; but it was a great experience to spend an hour living in another's footprint on this earth; t seems the last occupant was a Miss Elizabeth Williams First entered into OS it seems between 1898-1908 The Certificate translated basically is for an exam achievement at Methodist ( Calvanist) Sunday School issued to Cadwaladr Williams class 2; 21st March 1902 For those not old enough to remember proper money; the 1960 receipt from the co-op approx equates to 30 players ciggies: 30p matches: 1p biro: 5p 1 oz golden virginia: 23p 3 gallons of petrol: 70p Happy Days !!!!!!!
  17. So last year when I went to Coltishall the tower was locked, so a quick message from pretty vacant who was visiting it later said it was wide open. So I decided to nip down and see it for myself. Its fairly stripped off its features, but it does have some nice colours and its always nice to get in a tower. The ATC tower is a concrete one, and was built after the original one was bombed. It was extended during the cold war and contained offices, visual control room, a balloon room, airfield lighting controls and bedrooms for the meterological and control officer. Since the airfield closed in 2006 the tower has laid empty since. Quite away around the perimeter track is this tiny little building I found. its known a the B centre and worked in coordination with the A station, which would be controlled by the console in local control. the switched commands would would be sent from the console and converted to codes by the relay rack. These would then be sent by six pairs of telephone cables to the B centre. This would then allow the codes to be read and select the correct lights to be put on.
  18. So this is my last post from RAF Coltishall.. this was the officers mess which is situated just out off the main area. Its a standard H block design which is common in most RAF accommodation blocks. the wings are used for an upstairs and downstairs accommodation. Similar to the sergeants mess it has a new three storey block built on too it with an interconnecting corridor. These blocks are quite plush with nice lights and some funky carpets. this is prob one off the last used mess halls in the country now. So its in reasonable condition. Made a few visits too this block from 2017 to late last year. The standard three bay arched door. Similar too that at Raynham and Upwood. The kitchen areas are quite extensive. Restroom areas with special coat hangers. In one off the rooms is some nice artwork by the servicemen. The newer block was a bit more bland with repetitive rooms. In the basement off the main block is a little room, this has been converted into a small social club. Before the days of health and safety, there was more nice artwork on the walls.shame it was pitch black down here.
  19. The end was nigh for Mookster and my North Midlands Roadtrip back before Christmas. Mookster remembered seeing this site when visiting the Crich Tramway Museum in the 1990s and had made it a goal to visit it when he discovered it had not been demolished, he previously thought it had. We parked in the Museum and walked up the driveway to the site. An older chap and some friends who frequent the site and had keys, had been feeding the birds and we exchanged some pleasantries; "As long as your not smashing anything, go for it"; was the general opinion; so we filled our boots. Sadly; much is inaccessible due to flooding; and it is overall, pretty trashed, but it had some great photo ops! I enjoyed it, and the lighting the evening was producing. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678698751578
  20. Once in a while a house appears that is just something else and this house was one of those. Visited with Ninja Kitten one cold November day. I know a lot of history to this house but will hold it back to protect the house. Giving too much detail of its history along with names would compromise it. The photographs can speak for themselves. A veritable feast of dusty vintage artefacts locked in another time. The bedroom pictured here looked as if it had remained as it was when the very young soldier perished in WW1. An organic museum if ever there was one in existence. A museum to a fallen soldier. Hope you enjoy
  21. Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  22. I have sat on this one for a fair while.earlier in the year I made quite a lot of trips here trying to find various bits of it.I had been on a visit here years ago and saw some bits,but I knew there was so much more to it.being near to me it was essy to go regularly to check it out.there is security on the site and cameras.so you just have to be a bit careful.Coltishall is now used as an industrial estate with many old buildings in use.it started off as battle of Britain fighter base during the second world war.fighter planes off various sorts were flown from here including hurricanes and spitfires.after the war it was used heavily in the cold war and was designated as a V bomber dispersal site.basically a back up airfield if the aircrafts hme airfield was damaged.the last planes to be based here was the jaguar jets.these saw service in the first gulf war.with the introduction of the euro fighter Coltishall was deemed none essential and so the station closed in 2006.it was a big question what was going to happen to the site.then Norfolk county council stepped in and bought it and this raised a few eyebrows.there track record is not great. SERGEANTS MESS I have visited the officers mess a few times meeting up with pretty vacant and JSP o one time as they visited too.the sergeants mess though is like the officers mess but not so grand.here the NCO's could relax and unwind,there was accommodation provided on the wings and a new block added. The more modern accommodation blocks. RECREATION As usual with the armed forces recreation is a big factor.on coltishall there was a pool,gym and five aside football plus fields for grass sports.sadly the gym is a no go now. BATTERY MAINTENANCE This building was for storage off batteries for planes and veichles.jet planes carry some hefty batteries so a place was needed to store them safely,also there was a bit at the front for testing and draining the batteries.it had a morgue feel to it and now known as the battery morgue. BOMB STORES AND FUEL A different way in was needed to do these as they are a fair way from the main site.and with CCTV covering the way down I did not want to get caught in the open.like most airfields the bomb stores are located a fair way from the main base for safety.and near to where they would take off.here there was a large building for testing the bombs and making sure they were safe.nearby is the fuel stores.not sure if these were for the planes or not. Fuelling depot HANGAR AS per standard there are four hangars here.several are in use.most of the maintenance work on the planes went on in here.to the sides there is offices and canteen areas.there was seriously nice airmans graffiti in here. JET TESTING With the advancement of jet engines on planes there was a need to test the engines.coltishall had two testing parts,an indoor and an outdoor one.the out door one allowed the planes to back up to the exhaust duct and fire up its engines which would then be passed through the exhaust duct and through the chambers.the test bay is surrounded by thick concrete blast walls. The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process. The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process. Thank you for looking.I did take lots more photos here but I could be forever on this post .with more smaller buildings.
  23. Day two of @Mookster and my first Northern Explore of the year; and in true Mookster style; we get up from our cosy beds and leave the sleepy world of The Premier Inn before breakfast is even a thing in these hotels; a point that hurts me to the core as the Designated Driver, but clearly pays off once the wall of fatigue is overcome. We leave the hotel and take a drive to Bee Hive; this weekend has been a little hit and miss so far; so we have high hopes of this as it had been the Tour Bus stop off of the month; and after parking up and spending much time trying to get inside having been spotted by the sleepy street waking up numerous times; we set about a great explore. This site is very stripped out inside; but the lighting is just divine; the paintwork, features and the things that are left behind are just lovely. We both REALLY enjoyed this one; despite the bareness, it had a really nice feeling about it. - The first of the two mills on this site, was built in 1895, with the second larger mill following soon after, in 1902. The complex was constructed in a rather lovely Italianate style, with staircases disguised as campaniles along with terraced roofing and balustrades and including a very picturesque lodge/office building at the front gate. The mill span cotton up until 1967 when that venture closed. Ever since then; Bee Hive has had various other industrial uses, seemingly most recently it was occupied by a bed/furniture warehouse until they vacated some time ago. The place eventually closed down entirely in 2016 and plans to demolish this beautiful building, despite its protected status have been heavily criticized by the locals; and rightly so. Would be a tragedy. #1 [ #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 As always Guys, thank you for taking the time to look, More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157703821237512
  24. This one has a bit of a bittersweet ending for me really/. It's practically on my doorstep but I didn't find out about it till about 2016/17 and it closed in 2010 with much disgust from the locals! I had tried and failed it numerous times because of either filming taking place on site; or workmen. I went to check it out just before Christmas and found it to have a small demo crew inside who very kindly granted me 15 minutes in the pool area only, and they came and checked on me every 3 or 4 mins. It had been partly gutted by this point and they were so nice, I kept to my word and only left with a few photos. Hints were dropped of the quietness of the site around the Christmas Period; but I had my disabled partner, Pearl staying for a few weeks, and I had booked several weeks off work to be with her as to me, that was far more important!!! So I didn't bother returning. Still; I am also glad I didn't leave empty handed! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676566144727
  25. Shot back in January; this explore formed part of a Northern Roadtrip with @Mookster. We had previously tried and failed at this place some time ago. It was nice to finally get inside this. We had several fails this weekend; but this was one of our successes. Slaithwaite had several local manufacturers in its local area; whom joined forces in 1887 to create the Globe Worsted Company; a textiles firm. They started out by building a large mill, which was typical of the era. The Globe Worsted Mills were built in two stages. The building of the first, Globe 1 began straight away in 1887 and was completed by the following year. It is thought that Glove 1 was built to a design possibly drawn up by local architect Thomas Varley of Slaithwaite. Globe 1 was 5 stories high and consisted of 33 bays. By 1889; the second phase, Globe 2 was built on the opposite side of the road; with an overhead walkway connecting the two buildings. Globe 2 was slightly different and had 5 stories plus a basement, and had 15 bays. The Globe Worsted company continued from strength to strength over the years, and like many other textile mills; it saw a gradual decline in trade towards the end of the 20th century. The company went into administration in 2004 and the mill closed later that year. The site has been sold to a private developer and a £30 million project is progress to renovate the buildings into a multi-use complex of public and business facilities. The chimney has been demolished as part of the works. Globe Mill 1 is slowly being converted into a pretty stunning looking development; hopefully this mill will follow in its footsteps. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676959136467
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