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  1. As usual with our explores, they are never really a walk in the park. Access to the building itself was a challenge as the top area in which we needed to go was locked off completely. Thankfully, being quite adapted to the tasks at hand, we managed to ride on top of a lift to gain access to the building. Once inside it was clear that the building was in quite a bad state. Natural erosion has started eating away at the 60 year old building, and rust can be found throughout. Pigeons were lurking in the crevices and the whole place smelt of damp. The building was a former office block but has been abandoned for 20 or more years. Here is some of the best photos we managed to get. Thanks for looking! C P.S - Check out our channel! https://www.youtube.com/user/Kirbsvids
  2. With an ever lasting itch to explore a prison or police station that needed scratching, the time came to explore Brentwood Police Station. Unfortunately solo but a great explore despite! So after finding a good access point and choosing my moment wisely between passers by, I found myself within the grounds of the police station and soon inside. The building is mostly stripped out and a bare shell but that wasn’t the main sight to see, I had my mind set on finding the cells! After trying every door it was just my luck they were in the last place I looked. Attempting the court house adjacent the police station proved unsuccessful. History courtesy of Mockney Reject
  3. CAMELOT - Theme Park - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 This abandoned resort and theme park is located in the English county of Lancashire. The park's theme was based on the well-known story of King Arthur and the Knights of the roundtable After numerous takeovers, the theme park was purchased by Story Group and leased to Knight's Leisure who ran the park. However, it's closure was announced by the operator, in November 2012. In August 2014, an application to build houses on the site was unanimously rejected with 261 public objections. As of Feb 2018, the park stands empty a former shadow of its glory day slowly but surely falling victim to mother nature. A new housing development plan has been submitted, to many a protest from the local residents, However, if it does go through the once magical kingdom of Camelot will be lost forever. We gained entry into the former petting zoo and made our way to the middle of the park where we were caught by 4 security guards and a static full of dogs. Anyway, I hope you can enjoy the pics as its all I was able to get. Any feedback greatly appreciated.
  4. Built in 1871 but had been refurbished at some point. Now, I don't do heights.. So I was chuffed to see my mate practically run towards it in excitement and go first. It was pretty high and the grated floor was not ideal if you wanted to avoid looking down. The tower probably stands around 40-50 ft but exact measurements are unknown at this point. Apart from the odd clanging of metal under our footsteps and how wobbly it was, it was a good first climb like this for me! Got some snaps as usual, enjoy!
  5. Hi all! Just a quick one this time, we decided to visit an old abandoned boatyard which also had an old car place inside as well. We couldn't find to much history on this one however it was nicely buried away in some trees/bushes along the side of the South Coast. Hope you enjoy the footage!
  6. Predannack opened in 1941 as an RAF base, but today is the satellite airfield to RNAS Culdrose - it is a restricted MOD site and an active airfield used daily for flying training and also provides our Fire Fighting training facility. The area is heavily utilised by Culdrose helicopter squadrons, light fixed wing aircraft and, on an occasional basis by other aircraft types including jet aircraft, for a variety of reasons. Predominantly crews are involved in intensive training sorties involving a high cockpit workload. On average there is in excess of 2000 aircraft moves a month at the unit. The airfield is also used by the Fire Training School for live fire fighting and rescue instruction/exercises and there is also a rifle range at Predannack which is frequently used for live weapon firings. Additionally the airfield is used for a variety of additional tasks when the Control Tower is unmanned e.g. gliding.
  7. Another old explore ...a little gem in Kent
  8. Unfortunatly the Glen o dee hospital was pretty trashed , a few nice little bits
  9. Established in 1926, G.L. Murphy was a family run business and supplied bespoke machinery to the tanning industry, as well as building rag cutting and cable stripping machinery. The company also provide refurbishment and renovation works for various machinery types.
  10. The history of Coalbrookdale foundry dates back all the way to 1572 when the land was passed to John Brooke who developed coal mining there on a substantial scale. A blast furnace was built at the site to produce iron, which blew up in 1703. It remained derelict until the arrival of Abraham Darby I in 1709. Abraham Darby I set about rebuilding the Coalbrookdale Furnace, using coke as the fuel. His business was that of an iron founder, making cast iron pots and other goods, an activity in which he was particularly successful because of his patented foundry method, which enabled him to produce cheaper pots than his rivals. The furnace was the first coke-fired blast furnace to operate successfully for a prolonged period of time. The Coalbrookdale Foundry – this area has since been converted into a museum Following the death of Abraham Darby II, Abraham Darby II was brought into the business as an assistant manager when old enough. The Company also became early suppliers of steam engine cylinders in this period. Experiments took place with the application of coke pig iron to the production of bar iron in charcoal finery forges. This proved to be a success, and led to the beginning of a great expansion in coke iron making. In 1768, the company began to produce the first cast iron rails for railways. In 1778, Abraham Darby III undertook the building of the world’s first cast iron bridge, the iconic Iron Bridge, opened in 1780. The fame of this bridge leads many people today to associate the Industrial Revolution with the neighbouring village of Ironbridge, but in fact most of the work was done at Coalbrookdale, as there was no settlement at Ironbridge in the eighteenth century. Workers boots hung on the front gate The blast furnaces were closed down, perhaps as early as the 1820s, but the foundries remained in use. The Coalbrookdale Company became part of an alliance of iron founding companies who were absorbed by Allied Iron founders Limited in 1929. This was in turn taken over by Glynwed which has since become Aga Foodservice. Castings for Aga Rayburn cookers were produced at Coalbrookdale until its closure in November 2017. Delivery yard, where the raw materials and scrap iron arrive One of the two cupolas, seen from the melt shop delivery yard Archive image of molten iron being taken from the cupola Number 1 cupola. This mini blast furnace melted the iron ready to be cast. Number 2 furnace Above the furnaces Compressors which blew air into the cupolas Rear of the furnaces Ladles hanging from an overhead rail system for transporting molten iron One of the ladles Moving into the casting area where we find racks of moulds Patterns laid out on the floor Patterns laid out on the floor The main casting shop contains a fair bit of automated casting equipment Beside the production line with wagons on rails for transporting castings Casting production line Casting production line End of the casting line Casting machine, where the molten iron is pored into Archive image of molten iron being poured into cast Automated production lines Automated production lines Tanks and conveyors Towards the end of the factory we find more machinery Forklift trucks Cherry picker Extraction hoods in an old part of the site The workshops shop contained a handful of machines Dress in the machine shop A pair of drills More drill-presses Finally, some of their finished products – an Aga in the canteen along with a Rangemaster fridge
  11. The Explore I actually explored this about eight weeks ago with Southside. I drove to Slough, Parked up and he had kindly found the way in before I got to the University Campus. The site is massive, and right in the centre of Slough. I work fairly close to Slough, and had seen the site some weeks before when collecting lunch from Roosters Piri Piri just opposite the site. It's kind of strange that its sat here for so long; its very close to London and land in this general area is typically very, very expensive. That does not of course, make Slough a pleasant place... I think there was a bit of an increase of traffic here after my visit, I have only just got around to editing these! Its amazing how such a large site has sat beneath the radar for such a long time!!! The Site Thames Valley University or TVU as its known; is part of the University of West London and formed part of a conglomerate of several campuses in Reading and West London. The closure of this Campus was announced in 2009 and the doors finally closed it's doors in 2010. The site has now fallen into disuse and it's 1000 students had to re-locate to other campuses around West London. Closure was blamed on the recession/credit crunch at the time; forcing the sale of the site. "Professor Peter John, TVU vice-chancellor, said: 'For the majority of students the closure of the campus will mean a move to one of our other locations either in Reading or West London. All those affected will be fully supported through the transition to minimise any possible disruption to their studies.' A total of 650 pre-registration nursing students at the Slough campus will be provided with a provisional timetable and have been told to pack their bags for the move to Reading by December this year." The site consists of two tower blocks (7 stories high), a ground floor canteen, a small circular building named "The Rotunda" which houses the University's Srudent Uninon, and a 2 story admin block. Plans were announced in 2017 to redevelop the site into 1,400 homes, but so far nothing has happened. Currently the site is owned by the Slough Council. It was a surprisingly relaxed explore. The road outside was very, very busy and all could be heard on the street outside. There were incredibly recent signs of a squat inside one of the rooms; fresh new sleeping bags and food dated for that day in bags; sandwiches, fruit etc. I could hear someone inside who I believe left when they heard us. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 Thanks for reading! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696167343975
  12. Hi all. We have invested in a new camera and went out during the night to see how well it can handle the low light images. The result was actually rather impressive! So please enjoy the snaps we managed to get. It isn't a new area, but it is a good place to get some shots. Feel free to let us know which pic you guys like! Keep in touch to see some new places real soon. Cheers, C
  13. A little gem of a place ...went here when it was guarded by a very irate bull lol
  14. Falcon house. It's been in Swindon since the early days of this towns birth and has been sat empty and abandoned for 16 years. It was said to be the very first headquarters for the well known company zurich, an insurance company, but was promptly moved to a more practical and efficient property. The old office block is situated in Swindon town centre on top of a car park right near the entrance to town, which is an eye sore to some but a worthy explore for us. There was nothing much left, only old phones and some really old school computer stuff. It was the view at the end of the video that made it all worth it, being the second highest point in the town aside from the john murray building. What a view! So please enjoy this video by my good friend and make sure to check out the channel! Have fun out there, C
  15. After hearing about the permanent closure of this well known super store giant, we felt like a part of our childhood was gone forever. In the store we visited, we found the names of those loyal workers written on the wall with one of those people having worked there for 20 years, but unfortunately we couldn't go back and get a photo due to my camera running out of juice. But all is not lost as there is a full video on my friend's youtube channel so check it out! Here are the best photos we managed to get, thanks for looking. C
  16. Snowdown was the deepest colliery in Kent reaching well over 3,000 ft (915 metres). It was also the hottest and most humid pit in Kent and was given the name 'Dante's Inferno' by the miners. Regarded by many as the worst pit to work at in Britain, most Snowdown miners worked naked because clothes became too uncomfortable. The miners could consume around 24 pints (14 lires) of water in an 8-hour shift. There were frequent cases of heat stroke. Snowdown closed in 1987
  17. What's left of the south marston hotel, remains an empty, scorched shell. Not much to see on this one, and I am way to late but hey, it still provides an eerie vibe. And the photos came out pretty good too. Thanks, C
  18. Hey everyone, so I'm pretty sure everyone's heard of this place so i dont really need to explain much about it, but if you haven't, below is a brief history of Denbigh Mental Asylum. Grade 2 Listed building. Built work started in 1844 Building work completed in 1848 Built to house up to 200 patients with psychiatric illnesses. In the early 1900's it housed 1537 patients (Approx). The hospital had its own farm and gas works. Planned for closure by Enoch Powellin the 1960's, however it only began closing in sections between 1991-1995. Nurses Quarters: This is genuinely one of the best condition buildings that i have ever explored. Most of the lower floor windows were covered in either ivy or thick vines, so it got quite dark in some sections of the building. Now for the hospital itself, my personal favorite photos: Thanks for reading, Make sure to check out my youtube channel Jake Alan Craig for the video and my instagram @exploring_with_jake for regular abandoned photos. #WereJustTrespassing
  19. Brick production at the Clock House Brickworks dates back to 1933 when the Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded to exploit a rich seam of Weald Clay that had been discovered. By 1941 the original company entered into liquidation due to the war effort and the lack of need for the hollow-block ceramics they were producing. A share of the company was sold to the London Brick Company, who in 1945 eventually purchased the company to avoid a full closure. Production was vastly increased, in part to the housing boom of the 50’s, and during the 60’s the site was rebuilt to cope with the increased demand. The London Brick Company was acquired by Hanson PLC in the 1980’s and the works was refitted. In 1998, Clockhouse Bricks were used by three major exhibitors in that year’s Ideal Home Show and in 2000, Clock House was said to be Hanson Brick’s main soft mud production site, producing around 42 million bricks per year
  20. It’s been a while for various reasons but I am back and hitting the “move along, nothing to see here” central resource library… no seriously, nothing to see here. So after a brief chat with who turned out to be a long time reader and follower through instagram, we chose a spot to meet and hit the central resource library. Now to be honest, I was pre warned over a year ago that this place is absolutely trashed and I can confirm exactly that but it’s one I can now tick off the list. There’s not much to see, unless smashed windows and terrible graffiti is your thing so there is a lack of photos and hardly warranting a report, but here we go anyway! History wise? It’s a library… it closed and moved to a new location, that’s pretty much all I can say!
  21. History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  22. Anzani House is a detached, self-contained 6-storey building totalling 144,000 sq. ft in area with central courtyard and surrounded by surface car parking situated on Trinity Avenue, Felixstowe approximately 2 miles from the town centre and adjacent to Felixstowe Port. Myself & a friend went here to explore last October & found a way in. We parked at the BP garage nearby & walked up towards the building. We got to the site at 6:45am on a Saturday morning. That way there would not be that much activity in the area at that time. Plenty of CCTV cameras everywhere, so watch out & try to not look too shifty I have since tried to get in & found no entry whatsoever. Gutted. Might try again soon. Hope you enjoy the pics.
  23. Only a few quick shots, taken without a tripod. I don't know when the chapel (called "Capel Zinc") was built, it was a subsidiary tabernacle for the now Holy Trinity Church in Corris. Chairs has been removed and apparently the property is now used by a flower grower. Visited with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4
  24. This was an old explore from 2012 , the church and school closed in 1977 and Im not sure if its still empty or has been redeveloped
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