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  1. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  2. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  3. Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Diolch am edrych eto
  4. This church had been on my bucket list for a while and I finally got access, granted it happened last year. I don't know a lot of the history of the church, other than the congregation was founded by German immigrats in the 1800s. The origional church burned in the Chicago fire and a new one was constructed in 1904. In the 1910s Polish immigrants moved in and the German congregation declined in membership. It bounced back and years later in the 50s a large Puerto Rican population came in and spanish masses were offered for the first time. Membership throughout the 60s and 70s etc kept declining and in 1990 the church officially closed. The rectory, convent and school were all torn down. As for the chruch a development company owns it and want's to turn it into luxury condos and a music school.
  5. History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  6. This made up part of an epic road trip back in September 2011. Haven't been on a UK one like this in a while! Who's up for one?! It was called the Dirty Stinkin Northern Road Trip I think this place may be demolished now, but it was quite an interesting explore, even if we did get thrown out before we explored the top floor. Least the security fella was a top bloke! Gave me his badge! haha
  7. Walkergate Hospital in Newcastle opened in the 1880's, it was originally a hospital for infectious diseases. During the First World War injured soldiers who were sent home were temporarily housed in the two pavilions at the east end of the site, these were demolished in 1979. In the Second World War the hospital fell victim to bombing. In more recent years the hospital had an ENT department, x-ray and a small theatre.. Various parts of the hospital closed over the years, with the announcement that the final two wards, that provided longer term palliative care for patients with chronic conditions and shorter term respite care, would close during the summer of 2011. The demo was already well underway when we visited. On with some pics Externals Internals
  8. Been holding off posting this for a while but thought I would share it now... Known about this place since I was a kid and was always intrigued in seeing the inside, you could even say this is what sparked my interest in urban exploration. So after many years of wonder, many hours of research, a lot of head scratching along with the odd bump to the head we found our entrance inside the bunker! I am not going into details of our entry as we would rather not see this place trashed, however once we were inside the bunker was in fantastic condition… all-be-it empty of any contents other than generators. We were also surprised to see the power still on in the majority of the bunker. After an hour or so wondering the coridoors heading back and forth through the bunker, curiosity got the better of us and we ventured up the staircase at one end of the coridoor which emerged to ground level inside Sovereign House. After the odd few moments of exploring we jumped at the sound of a loud beep, fearing this may well be our warning to leave we made our way back to the exit, just as alarms began to sound. Most of you probally already know the history of this place and I suspect a lot of you looking this up will be local to Hertford, but here’s some history on the the bunker shamelessly pinched off the interwebs. Also as the majority of the place had already been void of it’s contents I decided to shoot on video instead.
  9. First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  10. This was a full fun visit and a lovely tricky one to get in to. History Brogyntyn Hall was constructed in 1975. It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the houses of the gentry in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family, Lord Harlech. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  11. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  12. This former school swimming pool was built in 1904 and abandoned in 1997. I happened upon it randomly and had a hunch that there might be a swimming pool inside but didn't expect much given the state of the exterior. Well, it turned out to be pretty decent inside. Clearly nobody has been inside here for a very long time. The pigeons have set up shop and went absolutely bonkers when they saw me. They've really done a number on the place, or should I say a number two? It's pretty minging to be honest but at least there's no shitty graffiti or vandalism. This was a night visit so I had to light paint all my shots. I didn't do too badly considering but it would be cool to see it in daylight. Hopefully someone else will have a look soon. This long curtain covered spectator seating for some reason The floor up here was well dodgy, you can just about see some holes on the left of shot Cheers for looking
  13. Was working in the area and thought it would be rude not to nip in here as its not everyday you get to explore while working so a lone visit after some dodgy balancing act on a tree across what felt like a torrential stream ha ha , just nerves i guess ,hope you like Leri / Lerry Mills, situated at the confluence of the Ceulan and Leri rivers produced Tweed for suit making using both water wheels from the river and workers to power the looms and spinning machinery. Little history can be found about the mills but they were built on the site of an old furnace which smelted the lead from local lead mines. Records date this back to 1642. The mill itself stopped meaningful production around 1958-60 in-line with when the UK became a net cotton importer and the general demise of the industry put paid to over 800 mills. At this time the two mills (the one photographed here is further down the riverbank) were purchased by Mr J Hughes – he ran the mills with his wife till the end of 1980 as a popular tourist attraction. In the August of 1981 they put the whole site, including a 6 bedroom house, the two tweed mills, a craft shop and 14 acres of land around the river bank with shooting & fishing rights, for sale at a guide price £150’000. The site appears never to have been sold and has gradually fallen into decay since
  14. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  15. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
  16. After visiting the site last year, and only making it half way down the 'stairs of death', and all the other entrances completely sealed, we decided to head back and give it another shot.. This time the stairs were even more dangerous, and were completely missing a huge section of steps, that had been completely destroyed. After deciding it a wasn't a great idea to continue further, we decided to see if any of the other entrances were open, and to our surprise we found a way in!! Fresh soil had been put down around the area, and it looked like work had been taking place, so not sure what the future of the bunker is at the moment. There's not a great deal left inside, but the tunnels themselves make for some decent photos!
  17. selwyn motors is an independent coach operator in the isle of axholme lincolnshire in the fairly remote village of belton between scunthorpe and gainsborough having previously done this yard a return to barry dodds was called for so a slight detour on the way home brought me to saxon lane selwyn motors is a difficult yard to find unless you know what you are looking for set back up a drive off the main road . started by his father in 1939 selwyns is an independant operator run by barry on his own predominatly a coach operator although he did have a service route 292 belton to doncaster which has ran for many years and was a saturday only 1 journey each way shopping service using the double decker which ended in december due to a new rule where the buses have to have flat platforms for disabled/buggy access added to this a cut in subsidy by north east lincs cc this rural service doesnt carry enough passengers to make buying a flat platform bus viable and with 2 way travel and isle doing the school contracts barry in his 70,s has decided enough is enough and was in the process of a re mot of the 53 seater to join the 49 seater available for private hire although 90% of the work has been done this vehicle still stands idle. almost every bus selwyns have ever had are at their yard many have been stood derelict for many years with trees and green moss growing either on them or around them refusing to sell his buses unless he can get the right kind of price for them it looks like a buses graveyard with the bus sheds and buses filled with all sorts of unimaginable crap.... barry selwyn dodd gives nothing away. if you like this post check out my other bus posts. one of the original buses in the name of E.R dodd mwb 310 a 1950 bedford ob previously owned by roevilles of stainforth now 68 years old still stands in the shed at selwyn motors along with ex wallace arnold aua 435 J.. a 1971 aec reliance passed to dodds in 1976 435 stands at christchurch when she was in service with the saturday afternoon return service to belton OJD138 R ...a leyland fleetline fe30agr new to london transport as dms2138 in 1976 stands at christ church the bus stands themselves now long since gone far from its london home 138 sits among the vegetation and assorted clutter in the peacefull lincolnshire countryside still with its original 292 blind now filled to the brim with clutter retired due to broken springs hsv 126 ex wallace arnold passed to wray of harrogate joined selwyns in 1994 and 23 years on it still retains its wray livery this has on one occasion filled in for the metrobus on the 292 90% completed 126 just needs a few more jobs doing before she can return to service DDB 169 C a 1965 daimler fleetline new to north western as 169 shortly returning to belton via sandtoft having been stood many years is in a very derelict state hardly any paint remains but uncovers it greater manchester origins another bus filled with crap 844 FKX a DAF nothing else is known about this vehicle apart from it used to do selwyns contract to axholme school before the advent of 2 way travel sits derelict among its companions awaiting resurection. R681 WRN formally R60 RED a volvo 49 seater was selwyns latest and possibly final aquisition leaves axholme school epworth on completing a private hire job for the school awaits its next job the majority of its work is now rail replacement jobs and occasional school trips out
  18. One of my favorite sites, I just love this building with its stunning wood structure, shame the vandals keep try to torch it!
  19. Hi all! We decided to hit the road and head for Staines to take a look at an industrial warehouse which was still full of all the old stuff! I couldn't find much history about the place as it is very old and from what I can see dates back to 1919 so a very long time. The explore was awesome, checking out all of the old machinery in the building and having a good wonder around! Access was fairly straight forward after having a quick scout of the building but once inside we were amazed at how big this place actually was! Anyway please feel free to check the footage!
  20. Smudges 1st ever photographic report - may 2018 Smudges has been known by numerous other names over the years from The Crofters Arms Hotel to McGees to Moghuls Palace but has always retained it's charm and character. A true time capsule rotting away in the heart of Bolton. Featuring some stunning hand-carved bars and one of two of this type of revolving doors that exist the other located in a grand hotel in London. The Urban Collective We Film It... Thank you for checking out my pics guys! Clarky The Urban Collective We Film It...
  21. it was actually a last minute decision to visit this explore. en route home from doing the manton colliery explore i passed the fomer pumping station at bracebridge with a shall i or sha,nt i so a quick turn round of the car i squeezed in behind some twat in a skoda who thought it a very good idea to park across the entrance who then decided to move and the explore was on. Built in 1881 Bracebridge Pumping Station was part of Worksop's new sewage system. It used two steam-driven beam engines (together with a travelling crane) to pump the sewage to the effluent processing facility. The engine was coal-fired, with the coal being brought in from nearby Shireoaks Colliery by boat via the Chesterfield Canal. Like many Victorian pumping stations it was built with no little style, designed in an Italian Romanesque style including ornate cast-iron columns and a spiral staircase. Apparently these remain inside (the columns are most definitely visible on external view). Now Grade II Listed, the building along with 1.33 acres of land is currently bricked yp to prevent access so sorry no interior shots the old pumping station has been like this since it was refurbished many years ago there was talk of turning it into an attraction but nothing has happened yet and possibly wont do for the forseeable future the old pumping station viewed from high hoe road the old beds still filled with water one of the victorian columns can still be seen through the windowless building rising upwards towards the ornate chimney a closer view of the ornate victorian columns the base of the chimney from the back of the pumping house the rear of the pumphouse the rear of the pumphouse and chimney the middle of the chimney with the lightning conductor on the right the top of the chimney and the lightning conductor someone had gained access inside by a rope tied to one of the windows but feeling a bit cream crackered i didnt fancy the tarzan routine so i didnt bother
  22. Hello everyone! I never used to post reports often. But over the last 3 days & joining this forum has put me into a real good mood and the feedback has been amazing!! Thank you all This was an explore i was not to sure about. I did not like the location and it had a spooky feel about the place! We had been inside around an hour and it was pitch black before we started hearing lots of noises and talking. I was a little worried it would be some "chavs" or "kids" smashing the place up with all the noise so we decided to leave. As we where leaving we bumped into a photographer and a model in a wedding dress. - This was my first time bumping into anyone on an explore! We spend about 30 more minuets inside before we moved on to the next location. A little history - The Fletcher Convalescent Home opened in 1893 and closed in 1998. It served as a hospital and during the war. (A tuberculosis hospital for the military) Since it closed the buildings have been subject to numerous planning applications, none of which have been successful. This building also features on the in the Victorian Society’s “Top Ten Endangered Buildings” list of 2008. Thanks for looking!!
  23. this second part nearly didnt happen as when i arrived i found the yard had changed hands and was all set to write it off as a waste of time and head home untill i spotted something in the far corner of the yard and sought permission to take some photographs which was given by way of intercom so off i trotted across the yard camera in hand to find my subject. mass transit was founded in May 1998 by Michael Strafford an engineering business, performing contract maintenance for other operators. It also specialised in the conversion of buses for non-passenger use. It then diversified into the operation of school bus services At the time operations ceased it operated 86 routes serving 32 schools and at its peak carried some 15,000 children a day to and from schools across south yorkshire and lincolnshire Between 2001 and 2005, Brightbus, then known as Mass Transit, had a substantial presence in lincolnshire following the acquisition of the bus operations of Applebys Coaches, Reliance Travel of great gonnerby and the grantham depot of lincolnshire roadcar. The Grantham operation failed under Mass ownership and was sold to centrebus and the Lincoln area operations to dunn line in 2005 In 2004, BrightBus purchased the long established Leon Motors of finningley that was formed in 1922 and operated buses in doncaster by 2008 the company's stage-carriage work had passed to first south yorkshire and concentrated on school contracts which were based at the main BrightBus depot at north anston mass/transit now brightbus disposed of the elderly leon and northern bus fleets which had kept the stage carriage and school services going and ran a fleet of 73 buses, including many English built three-axle dennis dragons and leyland olympians the dragons repatriated from Hong Kong. painted in what i thought was a very sickly green michael strafford retired at 55 stating ill health but didnt want to sell the business although he has disposed of the vast majority of the bright bus fleet possibly to other school or service bus operators . today the yard is in the hands of hallam express a logistics company full of lorries and fork lift trucks but a few of michaels buses are stored in the far corner of the yard all be it in a scrap state i think he is trying to sell these vehicles on for preservation rather than send them to booth roe or carlton PSV at barnsley he also still owns the former depot at leon wether these are to pass on to his family or he his hanging on for a better price i wouldnt know what i do know is like leon this marks the passing of another operator from the bus world. i acknowlage the author of the brightbus photos a rather scruffy mass transit bus possibly filling in between school runs heads for hexthorpe near doncaster a mixed group of bright buses mostly repatriated hong kong tri axles wait for the school run a wider view of the hong kong tri axles sandwich in a leyland olympian a hong kong tri axle MIL 55774 stands under the bus wash hong kong BIG 9823 which moved to leon finningley for a short time and C887 RFE parked at the rear of the yard near the inspection ramps viewed through the fence american schoolbus GHL 212 V in the yard as stated bright buses yard is now home to hallam express logistics lorries now park where buses once used to the former bus repair sheds now used for storage this is all that remains of brightbus a hong kong tri axle and a few scrap buses stored in one corner of the yard a side view of tri axle E537AKU and olympian W141 EON which spells leon the company brightbus aquired in 2004 the hong kong still retains its brightbus fittings and that of its previous company an interior view of the downstairs of hong kong looking down the bus it smelt like one of the museum type buses a unused shut in smell not unpleasant looking up the bus to be honest its in good condition and would make a runner again where as leon was in a deploreable state had to squeeze past rammels corner to get the interior shot SN53 KKH stands in pieces far from its london home although inside it could have just finished the days service came across this dennis dominator a long way from home formally with greys from ely complete with its cambridgeshire county council notice with junk dumped in its interior but wait all is not what it seems ...its colour and the sticker insider gives it away it was formally a magic bus based near piccadilly manchester the american schoolbus GHL 212 V is still parked up in the yard the interior and drivers seat tastefully redone ..... in moquet...yuck!! and as i take my leave the bus wash still exists but out of use mass brightbus still need fitters and the spirit of mass /brightbus continues to haunt the north anston industrial estate
  24. A early morning meet in Liverpool with @GK-WAX to try a few locations around the city that resulted in a few fails but can wait for another day. Then we decided on littlewoods.this one I have tried before with @telf and @whoopashooppa but didn't manage to get far so roll on a few years and I'm back again. Last time it was a bit of a fort knox so wasn't expecting to find a way in. Now yes it's stripped out but I enjoyed it especially up on centre tower roof on a sunny morning. So here's some history and photos. History... Architectural charity SAVE Britain’s Heritage welcomes new plans to save Liverpool’s most prominent Art Deco landmark, the huge white Littlewoods building that dominates the city’s eastern approach. Built in 1938 for Littlewoods’ famous football pools, the tall central clock tower and streamlined concrete profile are visib le far across Liverpool. The building housed the giant printing presses that sent millions of pools coupons across the country every week, to player s dreaming of winning a golden ticket. photos from SAVE Britain’s Heritage The National Lottery superseded the football pools, and the building has lain derelict for over a decade. English Heritage refused an application to list the structure and two redevelopment schemes have fallen victim to the recession. Earlier this year, local press reports warned that demolition was becoming increasingly likely as the structure fell into decline . SAVE responded by drawing national media and ministerial attention to the building’s importance , owned by the Homes and Communities Agency. SAVE P resident Marcus Binney accu sed N ational Regeneration A gencies of indifference to the building’s demonstrable architectural and historic significance. T he building was seen by sev eral million viewers when SAVE Deputy D irector Rhiannon Wicks appeared on the Alan Titchmarsh show in S eptember with Dan Snow, to highlight its plight . Now Manchester based developers Capital & Centric Plc have announced their intention s to buy the building . They are submit ting a planning application to Liverpool City Council to convert it into a hotel wi th commercial space. The new proposal, drawn up by Shedkm Architects , would see £16 million of private sector money invested in the refurbishment project , which could start on site summer 2013 . The project is thought to have won financial support from the mayoral City Deal fund. SAVE salutes the Mayor’s positive achievement in working with national government and the private sector in response to public opinion to secure the future of this important building. DSC_3040 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3066 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3065 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3064 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3063 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/JRoMB5][/url]DSC_3062 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3061 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3059 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3057 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3054 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3053 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3052 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3051 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3050 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3048 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3047 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3045 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3043 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3039 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3038 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3067 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  25. hi having finished a job fairly nearby it was time to do another one on my to do list that being clarborough railway tunnel. clarborough tunnel was built in 1850 and lies just over 2 miles from retford in nottinghamshire on the branch line of the sheffield to lincoln line which sees an hourly service between the 2 cities and occasional freight trains and is a site of special scientific intrest and houses clarborough nature reserve on top of the tunnel. proposed in 1844 and completed in 1850 by the manchester sheffield and lincoln railway ( MSLR) continues to trent junction where it joins the great northern and great eastern joint railway ( GN&GEJR) from doncaster and continues eastwards to cleethorpes via brigg and in a southerly direction to lincoln where it rejoins the east coast main line south of peterborough there was also a junction at clarborough which ran via torksey to sykes junction continuing on to lincoln and cleethorpes via market rasen this closed in 1959 but reopened in 1967 as far cottham to serve the power station all other freight traveling via gainsborough lea road . now a word of warning to would be explorers..... exploring live railway tunnels is not something to be approached lightly unlike dead tunnels they still have frequent trains running through them most are tucked out of the way and may be difficult to access but the main considerations are safety first dont do anything which would put yourself in danger and always be constantly on the look out for trains and most of all ensure you are not seen as nowadays they delay trains which incurs fines for the operator so BTP will not be sympathetic if you get caught and you may find yourself in front of the magistrate. that said clarborough tunnel is accessed fom church lane following the road for around a mile untill i found the line at cherry holt crossing on whinleys road a continuation of church lane my goal clarborough tunnel was around a quarter mile further on but not fancying playing dodge the train i parked the car at the locked crossing gates and set off on foot uphill again to find a way to the tunnel. passing cherry holt farm i attracted the attention of a rather loud doberman dog who proceded to follow me up the farmers field barking loudly being glad there was a large fence between myself and it walked in to the wood and nature reserve. following the main path through the wood i gained the nature reserve and found the ventilation shaft for the tunnel continuing on the right hand path found myself at the top of the east portal of clarborough tunnel. the next qustion was how to get down to it with a very steep bank and bushes after much probing found a gap and had to slide down the steep bank on my arse using my boots and grass as a brake eventually reaching the bottom and ensuring nothing was lurking walked towards the tunnel. an aproaching train caused me to take cover behind a retaining wall after which i spent around 20 mins photographing and deciding the best way out. not really fancying a 650 yard walk through the tunnel then a quarter mile to the crossing and not having a timetable it had to be the same way i got in but this time up the side of the tunnel bank and across the tunnel top and after much climbing got over the fence and rolled myself a fag while i regained my composure returning back through the reserve picked up a big stick lest my 4 legged friend should be around and find a way through the fence at least i,d got something to brain it with. there was no sign of the dog and thought it had gone in for its tea untill a large shape rounded the corner barking furiously yes my friend was back and continued to follow me down the field to much barking. leaving my walking stick at the crossing for someone else to use managed to grab a couple of train pictures to add to my report and another explore crossed off the list. cherry holt crossing the adventure starts here.... clarborough tunnel in the distance the signs warn engineers they are entering a site of scientific intrest and must obtain special permission to work here. the crossing access board clarborough tunnel ventilation shaft looking down from the top of the tunnel looking towards lincoln i came down the steep bank on my arse on the left first view of clarborough tunnel,s east portal from the embankment trackside safety first from here on in lantern repeater signal TN 835 (thrumpton) stands guard in the clear position at the tunnel portal clarboroughs tunnel board some nice beams in the tunnel roof that extend right through the tunnel which can be seen as they disapear into the darkness a tunnel marker looking outside the tunnel is quite wet in places a brick reccess and signal cable my reccess was cut in with a steel lintel above it blast on the roof from its steam days climbing back up the bank the top capping stones and brickwork a broken drain pipe looking down the banking at the track as a northern railbus scoots into the tunnel another view of the capping stones clarborough nature reserve is right on top of clarborough tunnel and extends the full length of the tunnel back at the crossing as 66740 and 017 top and tail a coal train from cottham power staion out of the tunnel came across these on my way back up church lane think they are something to do with the fun day ...beautifull babs windsor wallace and grommit love this one british strawberries and cream
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