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  1. This would be my 2nd fav kirkbride of those that I've seen so far and I was obsessed with seeing it. My first visit however was not the best as it was 8­F when I first got in and maybe warmed up to 19 outside but felt much colder inside. It was too cold really to focus on taking photos, too cold to really take my hands out of my gloves but necessary. I dropped my 24-70 lens on the floor fumbling around with big ass gloves on trying to switch lenses, when I got home in the wee hours of the morning the next day I was just carrying my camera (why it wasn't in the bag I don't know) and I dropped it in the driveway...with the same lens attached :(. I also lost 75 photos or so from that trip and found out later it was due to a faulty card reader when I was transferring them. So with all that I had to go back again and reshoot and one photo in particular I wanted to capture again was the sun streaming through the decorative risers on the stairway and onto the wall. Well neither of the times I went back was the sun out so I never was able to get that photo again. Last visit at least I had the newer camera as I sold the 7D a month prior AND it wasn't so freakn cold.
  2. Hello everyone I’m new here but have explored since I was a teen and only recently decided to document my explorations on video. Here’s one of them I hope you all enjoy!!!
  3. One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  4. The Crying Grave of Westfield NJ USA...It belongs to the Hamm Family and its called the Resurection angel..it also says when this angel sounds its trumpet the dead shall rise.. It looks like its crying https://www.facebook.com/jim.parris.39/videos/10151558943622645/ The Same cemetary holds the graves of Whitney Houston and her daughter it also holds the bodies of the list family..their father john list killed them all one by one to save their souls..he escaped remarried and was caught by the tv show americas most wanted..he died in prison https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_List
  5. It's been a while since I've posted anything. I though I would share something really cool, this is the Kenosha Theater. I have a thing for old movie palaces and I could not pass this up especially since I live pretty close to it. It technically isn't abandoned since a man owns it, but he dosen't have the money to fix it so it sits in it's abandoed state. I will also add that he does give tours to anyone. That's all I have to say so enjoy the decay.
  6. Hiya! I visited Salton City last year and it was one of the strangest, most haunting experiences I've had. It's not locked up- there's a tiny, tiny population still living there (!) but the majority is derelict, covered in graffiti and shows signs of being fled in a hurry (old cereal packets on shelves etc). It was a former luxury resort but was built on the side of a now-poisonous inland sea and is carpeted, creepily, with mummified dead fish. I've written the whole story on my website here: http://www.lifeoutthere.co.uk/2017/12/07/salton-sea-things-that-could-have-been/ Here are some pictures!
  7. Another short report from me, this was my second Urbex excursion so I'm keeping them short to kinda test the waters a bit before I go all out and find bigger places (or at least more interesting ones) with better equipment. I couldn't find anything about the place online but from what I gathered someone was evicted and then burglars came and stripped the place. That's just what I got from the graffiti drawn on by someone who has never attended an English class, although there are a lot of those types around here XD. Anyway, enjoy the pictures!
  8. I was suppose to visit this location with several friends 7 yrs ago but it got cancelled and I don't recall why. Then shortly after people were getting arrested here and it was off the list by most explorers. A couple years ago photos started popping up from here so I planned a visit. The only bad part was I no longer lived a couple hours away and was now about 7 so it was quite a trip. I managed to get here twice thankfully and these photos are from both trips. It's a very old campus which was started in 1828 for the rich mentally ill and other buildings were built as time progressed. For a time they practiced eugenics here which then became outlawed. The asylum closed in the 70's and was vacant till years later when a few of of the buildings were used as a medium- security prison. It was then sold to a developer who has converted several of the buildings to apartments and continues to do so. This place is most known for it's lovely spiral staircase in the admin building. It seems most come here , shoot that and leave.....but there's so much more here that is photo worthy in that building as well as the others. It's impossible to walk quietly in here as the old wooden floors creak with every step...it was really annoying trying to be stealthy. Also a lot of the floors and walls are leaning so badly that at times it felt like you were in a fun house with the odd angles. However having said that everything is in excellent condition here with only a few minor areas with some water/weather damage. Side note the patient cemetery is also located on the grounds which is in this set.
  9. A very old farm house early 1800's id say..it was or sale what i found in here was unlike anything id every found before A large roomy house thats an old piano.. This was the 1stof a few finds..the painting was bolted to the wall...seemed hard to remove without destroying it this might have something to do with this next room the words die die die die...carved into a bedroom door with a padlock on it the walls inside the room had scratches all over them... translate anyone caught 2 clear voices in this room A room with carpet on the door the mist in on the left...what could that be.. the house was for sale cheap but noone wanted to buy it...it was eventually torn down... I caught two clear voices in the bathroom ...you can hear the word paris(which is my name)..and boo..i heard footsteps while i was there but nothing on film...i reget not taking that painting..hope it was save befor it bwas torn down...
  10. Found this place by comparing a vague YouTube video and some info I've found here and there, then confirmed with Google maps satellite. Place was pretty big, but unfortunately pretty destroyed by vandals over time. Here are some pictures I took on my scouting trip there. Will go back for more/better shots.
  11. To start this is my first Urbex mission kind of, I couldn’t find an access point into the building but it literally only has two rooms. Back in the 1950’s and early 60’s this place was an auto garage in a tiny township of Centerton. There was no information about the building online so I had to ask my grandmother about the place. She he didn’t know when the building was constructed but she did know that the man who owned and operated the building was named Bob Wood, she didn’t know how long he owned the garage (she was a kid back in the days of operation) but when he died his son tried to operate the place but instead it was boarded up and left to rust.
  12. Ben

    USA Virginia

    Looking for locations preferably in Virginia, but neighboring states can turn into a camping trip easily. Ive been to Western state hospital, Eastern state hospital. I know about Renaissance Fair. Any other suggestions would be greatly appreciated (pm me obviously. Can you private message on this forum???). Happy exploring!
  13. I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside. One of the areas of this complex was/is a bowling alley which for years was flooded and no one was able to photograph it. However when they were preparing a building beside it to be demoed the water was removed from it. It's completely dark there so no available light except by light painting which I detest This building above they removed the cupolas for what reason I don't know and they are sitting behind fence at the building in the background This building was demoed 2016.
  14. History Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts. Explore This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States. Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia. Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River. (1) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) ( (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) Cheers for Looking
  15. this house always gave me the creeps as i drove by..then i noticed it was abadoned...I asked around and found out A Mrs Coffee live there..known as the town meanie..she had a hard life..her only son was killed in a car accident..her husband committed sucide..she had a daughter but noone knew anything about her... The basement held the sad reminders..a buys and girls bike for children long gone... the old lady had started hoarding... the house was unlivable who knows how she got around books were everywhere several rooms were so pack all i could do was poke my camera in the door that painting came home with me.. this was the master bedroom..it was impassable i think the old lady slept in the bathtub now to the really creepy room...judging by the art it looks like late 60s early 70's wow weaird as hell..seems the daught noone knew about left as a young child or died with the brother in the same accident...because her bed room is largly unchanged since the 1970s A very strange room the kitchen was the only toom in the hoiuse that seemed normal it was once a nice house.. i watched as workers picked over the house..i saw them smiling with arm fulls of stuff they decided to keep...i went in a few more times to find it almost completely stripped...i found dolls in unopened boxes..it was near chirstmas time so i took them and out them in the donation boxes for kids..before the other scavangers could grab them..they tore the house down..and quickly built another who sold quickly a new familt now lives on this spot.... I caught several voices thought my walkthough gost of this haunted doll house...makes me wonder if the new house is haunted too...
  16. I first visited this former mental hospital back in June 2012 and alot has changed since that time ...some good some bad. This hospital started it's life in the 1920's and closed in 1994. At it's largest capacity it had 5,818 patients. Like many other state hospitals in the U.S it had it's own farm , laundry, bakery, refrigeration plants etc and various other buildings were built in later years such as a chapel and larger separate hospital built in 1966 for infirm patients which had, an operating room, laboratory, diagnostic equipment, clinics, medical library and mortuary. When I first visited here it was overgrown with poison ivy, tall grass....just unkempt and relatively easy as no one seemed to be watching it. There were plans to convert it to senior housing but that never happened and in 2013/2014 a group bought it to convert it into a college. I had planned to visit about that time when a friend who visited said they'd already taken out the morgue contents of the larger building. He also said they'd oddly started fixing up the auditorium but other things left untouched. He also discovered had started doing illegal abatement and word got out and they were shut down. It still sits partially abated which gives a new look to what I'd seen before but it also took away some of the charm. I of course wanted to see the big morgue when I went back...whenever that was I wasn't sure. Well last summer I was able to get back and the place is much trickier to do since there's a damn security guy 24/7 who seems to make usual rounds. All the doors have been screwed shut with the exception of a few....of course way out in the wide open. We got there very early in the morning so I took a few night shots. I might add the old morgue thankfully is still there in the older hospital building although all the doors have been taken. I would like to add that this place is sheer hell due to the tunnels which I didn't need to use in 2012 (since we were able to freely walk around) and is most known because of these horrific tunnels LOL. You basically are crouched in some while going down or up very steeply (depending on how you enter the campus) and are narrow as well as filled with the white crap (most likely asbestos) from the pipes that have fallen on the floor. I did not enjoy them at all and we actually left earlier than I wanted because we were both exhausted from carrying the heavy backpacks and navigating the tunnels trying to find a new way out so we didn't go back up the tunnels. I plan to go back though and get pics of things we missed. So here are some pics from my early visit which are crap. I can't re-edit them due to losing them via the cat who knocked the external HD to the floor a couple years ago. I was not a good photographer of buildings back then as I came from nature so this "architecture" was a whole new game for me. I struggled a bit with composition and lighting.....and used a fisheye at times Unfortunately I don't have the same pics of old trip of auditorium to compare with how it is now. I never edited and uploaded the old ones Forgot to add I stopped by in the winter last year to take a few exteriors hence the snow pics
  17. When i was a kid this was known as Crazy Marys house...The rumor was she froze to death but had pleanty of money to put the heat on....it wasent true..she was a mean old lady for sure who scared the crap out of me screeching at me when i walked by..Her Husband was a doctor and who killed himself in the house..he was an old fashiong doctor...back in his day you never went to a hospitol you went to the doctors house...he amputated arms, legs, preformed surgury in the basement.. He died in the late 1960s his wife in the 1980s...the house has never see anyone stay there for long..they alway seem to move out After crazy mary died workers came to clean out the house..my friend knew one and he went in..i was still too scared..he came out with an skeltons skull and jaw...old time doctors used to have them...he lured me in and i saw a room filled with sinks and it was all to creepy for me its been empty for years..and looters took the starecase and all the copper.. check out the floors a homless person had moved in an kept himself warm almost burning the house down For such a big house the doctor never had any children th The house is for sale but it needs alot ofrepairs andthe neighborhood has declined so no one can afford it heres my video walkthough i hear a few ghostly voices
  18. The Congoleum factory in hamilton nj or as its used too look..its rubble now The statues are from the nearby grounds for sculpture.. I wasent the 1st person in to explore parts of it were in ptich dark... ghost of the past i guess this help factory workers dream of better days this area was filled with odd sounds ghostly sounds other buildings were well on their way out last cup This place was very haunted voices everywhere..banging and footsteps.. My name gets called..my departed brothers name is called.....i wonder where those ghost are now the site was massive staium sized but its all gone
  19. First Post Guys! Anyways, my group of friends and I found an abandoned Gas Station south of Atlanta. Apparently, the gas station went bankrupt due to the county screwing them over. A new highway system was out in, and the road to the gas station was relocated, so in order to get to the station, one would have to travel a good 5 minutes out of their way. Not worth it. So the station closed down and now it looks like this. May go back to take more pictures soon, stay posted. Have a great day guys, and be safe!
  20. Hey Everyone! Welcome to my very first Urbex..! My group and I went to these houses south of Atlanta that have been abandoned for a few years now. Unfortunately, they are going to be torn down soon, so anyone who may want to visit them, DM me ASAP! Anyway, The first house we went to was just empty and peaceful. The second house, not so much... We found graffiti telling us to leave; we should have listened. We stepped into the garage of the house and saw blood on the floor, and drag marks leading to the attic. Not wanting to see a dead body, we left. We're planning on going back to the attic soon in daylight. The third house was almost worse. We found some evidence that a serious crime may have happened there, as well as a swastika and a Confederate flag. We left without exploring too much of that house. On our way out, one of my friends looked back at the top floor of the house and saw someone in the window. We left quickly. I hope you guys like the pictures, some of them may be NSFW, the swastika. Otherwise, have a great day everyone! Be safe! Link to Google Drive with all pictures: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/1/folders/12y4aEjooNREuzS5ZMrjztkwrx2gIiinc
  21. HISTORY wiki text: Riverside Amusement Park was an amusement park in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA from 1903 to 1970. Originating as a joint venture between engineer/amusement park developer Frederick Ingersoll and Indianapolis businessmen J. Clyde Power, Albert Lieber, and Bert Fiebleman and Emmett Johnson, the park was built by Ingersoll's Pittsburgh Construction Company adjacent to Riverside City Park at West 30th Street between White River and the Central Canal in the Riverside subdivision of Indianapolis. The decade of the 1960s was not a kind one for Riverside Amusement Park, which was losing attendance for the first time since the end of World War II. By the time John Coleman lifted the "whites only" policy (in response to a series of protests organized by the NAACP Youth Council in 1963), the park was losing $30,000 a year. Increased cost of insurance, maintenance, and new rides, coupled with increased competition from the emerging theme parks, were cited by Coleman as the park closed for the last time at the end of the 1970 season. All the rides were sold or demolished by 1978. The land lay undisturbed for more than two decades, until the construction of the River's Edge subdivision in the early 2000s. =========================================================================================================================================== STORY In 1979 my buddies and I heard that they were getting ready to bulldoze the site of the long defunct Riverside Amusement Park in Indianapolis so we decided to drive by to get a final look. When we got there we were amazed to find easy access to the grounds. With my trusty Practica LLC at hand we ventured within and explored for several minutes until we came to the stark realization that this neglected plot of land had become the home to countless wild dogs. Picking up debris for clubs we beat a hasty retreat (pausing of course for a commemorative selfie.) The pictures were taken on 35mm slide film... Back in 2005 I came across the slides and crapily scanned them using a junky flat-bed scanner and used those images to create the Animated GIF below to send cross country via email to one of the krew. If there is a prize for worst images on OS these would surely take it - but even in this 'State' they trigger memories of that adventure; so in that they are still doing their job... Impressionists Views of Riverside Amusement Park (circa 1979) I opened this GIF and extracted the individual images and tried to enhance them to some degree. I then repackaged thumbnails of these into a fresh GIF that is marginally more effective than the original. (shown at end of report) Ticket Booth Shoot 25¢ From Inside Ring-Toss Main Attraction The Weed-lined Path Wheee! Domed (Doomed) Skating Rink Three scared cats in a dog park! (that's me on the right rockin' the Frampton 'do) Take Two If I ever come across the original transparencies again I will have to get some proper enlargements made.
  22. Hi everyone, I am a blogger from the Indiana State and a fairly new member to Oblivion State. I am "a cyber explorer of the web less traveled" and it was while randomly exploring Belgian websites that I happened upon a link to this forum. I have pretty-much lived in and around Indianapolis all my life and worked for several years as an industrial/commercial photographer. Although it has been many years since climbing/crawling around factories and such looking for "the shot," seeing the work presented here has me thinking it may be time to dust off the 25A-Red and Polarizer combo and see if I might get back into the "game." I have been itching to contribute here so I decided to kick off the adventure with a blog post about this website (features the first 10 members I have followed.) Check it out if you want: Illuminating the Oblivion State
  23. First I must apologise for not being around too much lately, other things have been going on and I've barely found the time or energy or want to explore stuff here. However I have just got back from a three week trip to the States where I saw many wonderful things and places. As many of you know I love my industrial explores, they are my favourite kind of abandonment. However, incredibly, this was the only industrial location I managed to explore on my latest trip! Still, it was one I had wanted to see for absolutely years and my main reason for heading to Detroit in the first place, everything else I managed to explore there was a bonus. The Detroit Harbor Terminal was built in 1925 by The Detroit Railway and Harbor Terminals Company. The ten-storey warehouse was intended to relieve a shortage of available storage space elsewhere. Cargo ships would unload materials at the dock, which were then stored or loaded onto train cars. To support the tremendous weight of so many tonnes of freight, the floors and columns were made out of reinforced concrete, which spread the load across the length of the building. On the north side of the plant was a single-story building that provided heating and cooling, as well as massive engines to power the air compressors. The building is sometimes referred to as the Boblo Island Warehouse because of a huge advertisement for the old Boblo Island Ferry painted on one side. In 2003 the port closed down and the warehouse was abandoned, but the port was reopened in 2005 handling mostly steel products and the occasional Navy ship docking there, whilst the warehouse building remains vacant to this day. It used to be an absolute breeze to get into here, with an old fence full of holes and an open loading bay door all that separated people from the inside. However recently a new fence has appeared along the entire length of the road and all but one access point into the building has been sealed. We found our way through the fence after a fashion, and following a very speedy run around the side of the building away from the highly visible road we were in and straight to the roof just in time to catch the sun rise over two countries. The river next to it is the river which separates the USA from Canada and as such there are border patrol boats who like to hang around, so it was very important to not get too close to the edge as they aren't best pleased when people trespass as you can imagine. After we'd had our fill of the beautiful sunrise we headed down and explored the rest of the huge building. It's pretty samey as nine out of the ten floors are exactly the same in construction, but the ground floor power plant compressor room is extremely cool. Thanks for looking
  24. The Martin Office Building, also known as the American Life Building, and the Stonewall Building, was built in 1925. it originally housed the Birmingham City Commission as well as various other firms and tenants. Sometime in the sixties The American Life Insurance Company moved their headquarters into the building and it came to be known as the American Life Building. ALI later acquired the Stonewall Insurance Company, which occupied the building until around 1979. The building gradually started being vacated until it's only function was as a document storage building until 2000. It has been essentially vacant since then. There have been numerous proposals and plans to renovate the building, all of which have fallen through. The farthest any proposal got was in 2008 when work got started to turn the building into some apartments. The work had gotten as far as complete asbestos removal, about 90% of the building being gutted, and the top floor almost being completely renovated into the new apartments when the 08-09 economic collapse completely stopped the project in it's tracks. it has since sat empty, with only a few vague proposals that went nowhere. I do wish I would've been able to see this building prior to the 2008 renovation work, as the old architecture and interiors are still very photogenic even being almost entirely barren. There's also a significant amount of squats in the building, we didn't run into any sqautters while we were roaming around however. We did run into a group of obnoxiously loud 15-16 year olds who we heard coming into the building while we were on the sixth or seventh floor. We decided to spook them in the staircase as they made their way up. 1. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 2. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 3. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 4. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 5. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 6. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 7. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 8. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 9. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 10. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 11. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 12. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 13. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 14. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr 15. Untitled by Alex, on Flickr Thanks for looking! more pics here https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157664452679664/with/25954177700/
  25. Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy.... It was the site of a controversial decades-long dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical weapons research projects involving testing on inmates. The prison is also notable for several major riots in the early 1970s. The prison was home to several trials which raised several ethical and moral questions pertaining to the extent to which humans can be experimented on. In many cases, inmates chose to undergo several inhumane trials for the sake of small monetary reward. The prison was viewed as a human laboratory. “All I saw before me were acres of skin. It was like a farmer seeing a fertile field for the first time.” Dr. X One inmate described experiments involving exposure to microwave radiation, sulfuric and carbonic acid, solutions which corroded and reduced forearm epidermis to a leather-like substance, and acids which blistered skin in the testicular areas. In addition to exposure to harmful chemical agents, patients were asked to physically exert themselves and were immediately put under the knife to remove sweat glands for examination. In more gruesome accounts, fragments of cadavers were stitched into the backs of inmates to determine if the fragments could grow back into functional organs. So common was the experimentation that in the 1,200-person prison facility, around 80% to 90% of inmates could be seen experimented on. The rise of testing harmful substances on human subjects first became popularized in the United States when President Woodrow Wilson allowed the Chemical Warfare Service (CAWS) during World War I. All inmates who were tested upon in the trials had consented to the experimentation, however, they mostly agreed for incentives like monetary compensation. Experiments in the prison often paid around $30 to $50 and even as much as $800. “I was in prison with a low bail. I couldn’t afford the monies to pay for bail. I knew that I wasn’t guilty of what I was being held for. I was being coerced to plea bargain. So, I thought, if I can get out of this, get me enough money to get a lawyer, I can beat this. That was my first thought.” I expected to find an epic medical ward only to be filled with disappointment. The practice was so common I can only assume it was conducted everywhere. Many advocates of the prison trials, such as Solomon McBride, who was an administrator of the prisons, remained convinced that there was nothing wrong with the experimentation at the Holmesburg prison. McBride argued that the experiments were nothing more than strapping patches of cloth with lotion or cosmetics onto the backs of patients and argued this was a means for prisoners to earn an easy income. The negative public opinion was particularly heightened by the 1973 Congressional Hearing on Human Experimentation. The hearing was supposed to discuss the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and clarify the ethical and legal implications of human experimental research. This climate called for a conscious public which rallied against the use of vulnerable populations such as prisoners as guinea pigs. Companies and organizations who associated themselves with human testing faced severe backlash. Amidst the numerous senate hearings, public relation nightmares, and opponents to penal experimentation, county prison boards realized human experimentation was no longer acceptable to the American public. Swiftly, human testing on prisoners was phased out of the United States. Only a renovated gymnasium is considered suitable for holding inmates. That building is frequently used for overflow from other city jails. The district attorney launched an extensive two year investigation documenting hundreds of cases of the rape of inmates. The United States had ironically been strong enforcers of the Nuremberg Code and yet had not followed the convention until the 1990s. The Nuremberg code states: “[T]he person involved should have legal capacity to give consent; should be so situated as to be able to exercise free power of choice, without the intervention of any element of force, fraud, deceit, duress, overreaching, or other ulterior form of constraint or coercion; and should have sufficient knowledge and comprehension of the elements of the subject matter involved as to enable him to make an understanding and enlightened decision.” The prison trials violated this definition of informed consent because inmates did not know the nature of materials they were experimented with and only consented due to the monetary reward. America’s shutting down of prison experimentation such as those in the prison signified the compliance of the Nuremberg Code of 1947. You look so precious.
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