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  1. I came across this mining camp known as "Bonnie Claire" on a road trip in December of 2018. It has been abandoned for over 100 years so it is unsurprisingly badly deteriorated. The area is also contaminated with arsenic and cyanide, but of course that didn't stop me. A couple of the houses about half a klick south appear to be part of a newer mining operation and there is evidence they actually had power out here. Someone spent a few nights in one of the houses as recently as 2017, given the date on the newspapers.
  2. This was originally a tandem mill for Wheeling-Pitt steel when it was opened, after it's closure about 12 years ago, it was bought by another steel firm - RG, this lasted until 2012, after it's closure, several of the outer buildings were used by a fracking firm that eventually pulled out in early 2017. Demolition started about a year ago and progress has been swift unfortunately. I apologize that some of the photos aren't that great of quality, I intend to do a revisit soon. I gotta watch for the cameras though lol
  3. I don't know very much about this location unfortunately. Lots of cool photos though! IMG_5958 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5959 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5960 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5961 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5962 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5963 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5965 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5966 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5967 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5968 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5970 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5973 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5974 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5976 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5977 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5978 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5979 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5980 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5981 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5982 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5985 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5986 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5987 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5988 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5989 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5990 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5991 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5995 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_5997 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_6004 by Ken Durham, on Flickr
  4. This city is one of the best spots I have been and was a blast to explore. I had to go back a second time to cover the whole area; first in September 2018 and again in Late November. Picher Oklahoma was part of the Tri-State mining district, and was deemed contaminated in the late 90's by the EPA. A mass exodus followed and by 2010 the population had reached a mere 20 people, a shadow of what was once home to 9,000 people. Within the next 2 years the last residents were forced to leave and the city became completely abandoned. Although some buildings have been demolished, quite a few areas remain intact in both Picher and Cardin, which is adjacent and also a ghost town. All 3 towns nearby were also abandoned due to contamination from Picher. Today Picher is known as the most toxic city in the United States, and the water in the nearby streams and river is orange and red. Even the birds stay away, and the town is deathly silent.
  5. Alright, this is my first post on here but I will get right to it. This hospital is trashed beyond belief but was still fun to explore. It was shut down in 1992 after the USAF pulled out of George AFB following the end of the cold war. These pictures were taken in December of 2018.
  6. A building used by a payroll clerk & security guards, I believe that it was left sometime in the 80s. There wasn't much, but I found many passes and cards dated from 1940 on the floor. You can see some of the time card slots used by employees and manufactured by IBM.
  7. Carrie Furnace Hot Metal Bridge. This spanned the Monongahela River to a large blast furnace complex which was abandoned in the 70s along with this bridge. It was built in 1900 and is 51 ft high.
  8. I couldn't find much info on this, the interior was pretty stripped and bare. Some of the graffiti was killer though
  9. https://imgur.com/gallery/iy0gFth Figured I'd just link the album here since it's eaisier, not used since the 70s
  10. (Image Heavy) Browns Island is located on a river in the Midwest, the island has a long, interesting history. It was noted by George Washington during his travels, and Meriwether Lewis from the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped there in 1803, on the site there's an ancient Native mound, and early petroglyphs existed on the head of the island. For around 100 years the island was privately owned and farmed until 1957, when a steel company bought it to build a coke plant. There was also a mail plane crash on the island in 1933 that killed the pilot and passenger. In Dec of 1972, right before the Coke Ovens started operating, there was a gas explosion which killed 21 construction workers, the oven were operational until 1982, eventually, they were demolished and the island sold slag for commercial use until 2008. Although there were no ovens standing, it was still an interesting explore, my neighbor and grandfather worked here when the Mill used it. I was very fortunate to get permission to go on it
  11. This is my first post on here, and these were taken with a cell camera, but I found this site interesting. This is a former control site for a Nike Missile Base that was part of a defense ring around a major city during the Cold War. The location where the missiles were stored/lauched in a few miles away and in use. Eventually this was used as a State National Guard Unit until abandoned around 1996. The night photos are of 2nd base in this region which is partially used
  12. The abandoned pool at Detwiler Park. It was opened in 1970, closed in 2009 after thieves broke in and stole water pumps and other plumbing. I
  13. An abandoned Apartment block. Built in the 20's, abandoned in the 90's Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr Abandoned Kenmore Manor by Ken Durham, on Flickr
  14. Visiting Oblivion State always triggers in me a spirit of exploration that doesn't get many opportunities to take flight... As I go about my day-to-day routine however, I am inclined to keep a keen eye towards locations that might beckon me from beyond the beaten-path in the hopes of snatching some content to contribute to this forum. In my neighborhood there exists a plot of land that has been left to the forces of nature and has turned into a patch of woods. In the summertime this forest-ette is nearly impenetrable due to the underbrush, but on a recent mild January afternoon - walking the dogs with my wife - we spied a structure standing in its midst. From where we were standing - beneath the "vulture tree," beside the "red fox path" we could just make out a roof-line and caught a glimpse of a gable end. We decided to extend this outing and walk around to the opposite side of the woods and see if we might discover just what we had in the way of abandoned structures right under our noses. Although the building was hemmed-in by many small trees I could see a way of passage that would not be so easily found during greener months. I was without my camera but after my wife assured me she had her phone I told her I was "going in" to see if this was worth further exploration. Thanks to the lovely lady I was able to document this reconnoiter. As it turned out, this was nothing more than a trashed single room garage structure. The service entrance was standing wide open and although the door was equipped with a padlock hasp there was no lock - The double bay door was 75% boarded up, with a gaping hole that would have made a padlock nothing but a joke. The interior was dry-walled and the caved-in ceiling panels suggested perhaps all the trash strewn about the floor may have entered the space from the attic - "pinata style." Items of note in the debris included a 1989 family photo, a 1971 building permit (for a building that once existed where there is now a car-wash - 4 miles west of here,) a paperback copy of Jayne Eyre, a "Zero-Turn" lawn mower (with zero turns left in it,) and a Console Stereo RCA Victor, Am/Fm Hi-Fi Turntable (with zero turns left in it.) So here I've made the most of the imagery to give you the gist of it. I can't imaging going back with a tripod and proper camera, but not ruling out metal detector... Birds Eye View Birds I View (vultures) In The Summertime (Google Street View 2008) Opposite Side - Summertime (Google Street View 2008) Catch a Glimpse. Approachable Hey, it's Open! Has an Address... It's a Trash Pit ? Mow-No-Mo' Obelisk 80s Hair Family Portrait Misplaced Permit
  15. Baron Steel in Toledo, Ohio. Love this place Baron Steel by Ken Durham, on Flickr Baron Steel by Ken Durham, on Flickr Baron Steel by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_6146 by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_6172 by Ken Durham, on Flickr 49708579_459653431231314_4660444961072742400_n by Ken Durham, on Flickr IMG_6168 by Ken Durham, on Flickr Baron Steel by Ken Durham, on Flickr
  16. I ve past this house for years.always had a car in drive way..then months ago no more car...i went to take a look.....the back dor had a latch i opened the latch and the whole door came off..big heavy door almost crushed me...well im in..i thought The door to the left lead to the basement..it was sealed tight...got a feelng it was flooded seems like theres some attempt at restoration thats a nice fireplace this is the olderist calander still hanging ive seen..odd its the same month 47 years later its always funny when the soap is still in the soap dish at the top of the stairs i found this..gaping hole a long drop into the basement i built a little bridge over it century old framed photos and a 1983 natasha kinkski playboy this must be the master of the house he musta been a professor and a surgeon the collection now i gotta figure out getting down over the hole.......I only got a female voice and it was outside...saying something...something..talks to you
  17. Anyone know of any abandoned bases/sites/installations in western/south-western Pennsylvania, Ohio or West Virginia? I was at a semi-disused support facility near Pittsburgh today
  18. This is from a exploration on the 13th of May, 2013. These pictures are mostly the east buildings from the interior. Second set will be south end and my favorites, the roof. Brach’s Candy was a Chicago (and world) candy factory legend. This facility, one of the largest candy factories in the world, was mostly built in 1921-23 and then partially rebuilt in 1948 after a tragic fire and explosion killed 11 employees. At its peak, the facility was over 2,200,000 sq feet (670,560 meters) and had 2,400 workers. Typical vulture capitalism in the 1980’s into the 2000’s destroyed the company and this facility closed the doors to workers in 2003. One of the office buildings was blown up for the movie Dark Knight in 2007. Due to much of the west complex being gang occupied and the neighborhood sporadically violent, I chose the last cold day of that spring to visit, on Mother’s Day, a very big holiday in the USA, figuring even gangbangers might take an afternoon off to visit their mums ? So I got there mid-afternoon and only left as it was getting too dark to see much, let alone photograph. I tried to go back one more time, but it was not possible to access, and within weeks it was in the process of being wrecked. For the USA, it had more interior metal than many buildings I've been in, which usually have been picked clean by scrappers, which gave it a nice ambiance. Overall, it was a very dark location, due to most windows being bricked up and it was late in the day when I visited, but what light I had was beautiful. The last pic in this set shows downtown Chicago in the distance. I'll post set two in a week or two, then start digging through files for other past and recent explorations. Many thanks to everyone who welcomed me on the introduction board. Thanks to all who share, some really amazing reports here, and looking forward to looking around more, but figured I should share something for starters ? Staklo
  19. Fairly new to this site, but I have been urbexing for years. is anyone from the USA? That is where I am from and would love to talk to people about places
  20. Afternoon All, Ive finally got around to putting up afew photos from my recent trip to New York, and on my second day there i visited the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital Heres some info/history, i wont post it all as on the Wiki page, there is alot of history, which you can see here if you wanna see more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellis_Island_Immigrant_Hospital The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, also known as USPHS Hospital #43, was the United States’ first public health hospital, opened in 1902 and operating as a hospital until 1930. Constructed in phases, the facility encompassed both a general hospital and a separate pavilion style contagious disease hospital. The hospital served as a detention facility for new immigrants who were deemed unfit to enter the United States after their arrival; immigrants would either be released from the hospital to go on to a new life in America or sent back to their home countries. The hospital was one of the largest public health hospitals in United States history and is still viewed today as an extraordinary endeavor in the public health field.[5] The hospital is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument. While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island has been off-limits to the general public since its closing. Efforts to restore the hospital buildings and others on the island are being made by government partner Save Ellis Island. In October 2014, the hospital opened to the public for small-group hard hat tours.[6] The original immigration station on Ellis Island opened January 1, 1892, and processed 700 people that first day. In September of that year, the Hamburg-America steamer S.S. Moravia[7] arrived at quarantine with several confirmed cases of cholera. Every ship arriving in the port of New York was held at quarantine before being cleared to land. Passengers found to have dangerous contagious diseases were taken off ships at quarantine and transferred to the hospital at either Hoffman or Swinburne Island. Twenty-four of Moravia's passengers were ill and twenty-two deaths had occurred during the voyage. Many were children. It was believed that the outbreak occurred due to the ship taking on contaminated water from the Elbe river. The threat of a pandemic caused all shipping traffic to be suspended. The backlog of ships held at quarantine and the lack of adequate medical facilities to handle the volume quickly precipitated the need for a more robust healthcare facility to treat immigrants and merchant marine sailors. Twenty years after opening, the hospital, as well as Ellis Island itself, was in decline due to tightening restrictions on immigration in the United States. In 1930, the hospital closed its doors.[10] After the hospital was closed, the FBI occupied the space as an office through the 1930s. During World War II, disabled American servicemen were sometimes housed on the islands, as well as some German and Italian prisoners of war. After the war, many war brides were detained and sometimes treated on Ellis Island. During the 1940s, the hospitals were utilized to treat Merchant Marine sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and U.S. military personnel. During the postwar period, electroconvulsive therapy was employed as a method to treat mental illnesses. This was preferred over the archaic cold water bath therapy or hydropathy, which could cause hypothermia. In 1954, the islands were officially abandoned by the Coast Guard and declared “excess federal property”. In 1996, the World Monuments Fund listed the hospital as one of the world’s 100 Most Endangered Properties, a warning echoed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which put the buildings on the list of “most endangered historical places in the United States.” A study conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy estimated that with about $3 million of federal funding, the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital could be stabilized for the next 15 years. According to the Conservancy, 15 years would allow time to develop a long-term preservation plan You would have noticed some art on the walls in the photos, this was by a French street artist JR awakens history with his ‘Unframed – Ellis Island’ Exhibition. The tour and exhibition provide an immersive visual and sensory experience loaded with historical significance. It is not to be missed! ~ Rachael Silverstein, The Culture Trip The work, which is accessible by guided tour, will remain up “until it decides to disappear.” The Unframed—Ellis Island project aims to bring alive the memory of Ellis Island, the entry point to America for millions of immigrants. Coming from all over the world, leaving their belongings, their family and their past behind them, with the fear that they may be sent back to it, the presence of these people who have shaped the modern American identity can still be felt in the buildings, although abandoned for the past 70 years. This is the opportunity to interpret the stories of these people through art. JR’s exhibit lives in the abandoned Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, on the south side of the island. Archival photographs of the hospital’s patients and staff were artistically wheat-pasted around the abandoned hospital complex of Ellis Island’s south side, creating haunting scenes that bring the history of these rooms back to life. Thanks for looking DJ
  21. I am looking for new places to urbex. I am from the northeast Ohio area near Akron. Feel free to email me if you have any places you are willing to share. I will exchange places. my email is [email protected] I attached some images from previous urbexes.
  22. The Black Family farm house..parts were built in the 18th century...while exploring a member of the black family caught me....he was a nice old guy gave me the history of the place..we went back to his house(across the street and chatted awhile... Juily 1976..it sells for 40$..i should have kept it... fly killer... when i turned the corner i saw a head of hair..it scared the bijesus out of me now thats old... arch ways in basement..not sure what it was used for how it once looked house is gone now..torn down...
  23. Firstly, I don't know if this is the correct place to post this. Secondly, I've discovered an underground access pipe that have evidence of being lived in a long while ago but I'm not sure how to enter. There's no ladder or stair system and those pipes are very dank and dark. I need some advice on how to be able to climb down and also how to navigate as well as what equipment I may need. So far my urbex experience has consisted of above ground structures and I have the necessary equipment for that so that may help in my underground exploring.
  24. After the Brownsville General Hospital relocated to its new location in 1965, the former buildings were converted into the Golden Age Nursing Home. Due to the normally full capacity of the Brownsville General Hospital, the hospital relocated. Shortly after its closing, The Horner Nursing Home/Golden Age Nursing Home was made/built in 1929 and closed in 1985 due to reports of horrible conditions and treatment of its patients. The nursing home was a residence for some of the nurses who worked at the hospital. It later became a care facility for the elderly. *Please take note of the sentences shown at the bottom of the video during scenes.* Location: Brownsville, PA Urban Exploration Paranormal Investigations ParaUrbex
  25. The Brownsville General Hospital opened in 1914 but wasn't completed until 1916, and closed in 1965. The hospital was always at full capacity and thus, an addition was made to create a third level over the central section of the building and raised the hospital’s capacity to 100 beds. Due to the capacity, the hospital was then relocated. Shortly after the closing of the hospital, The Horner Nursing Home/Golden Age Nursing Home was made/built in 1929 and closed in 1985 due to reports of horrible conditions and treatment. *Please take note of the sentences shown at the bottom of the video during scenes.* Location: Brownsville, PA Urban Exploration Paranormal Investigations ParaUrbex
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