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  1. Grand casino history Located in the Sefton district of Southport at the corner of Lord Street and Court Street. Originally built in 1923 as a garage and car showroom, it was converted into a luxury cinema in 1938 by architect George E. Tonge. The Grand Cinema opened on 14th November 1938 with Arthur Tracy in "Follow Your Star". The cinema was designed for and operated by an independent operator throughout its cinematic life. Seating was provided in a stadium plan with a sloping floor at the front (known as the Pit stalls and stepped floor at the rear which was known as the Royal stalls and Grand stalls. An unusual feature was the provision of a balconette which was attached to each sidewall. Seating was provised in pairs all along towards the proscenium. There were decorative grilles each side of the proscenium opening which contained the organ pipes of the Compton 3Manual organ which had an illuminated console on a lift, in the centre of the orchestra pit. The organ was opened by Herbert A. Dowson. In the ceiling was a large shallow dowm which had a central Art Deco style light fixture. There was a cafe provided for patrons. In 1963 the Compton organ was removed to Cheetham Hill Methodist Church in Manchester, which in later years was moved to Chorley Town Hall. In 1966 another Compton organ was installed at the Grand Cinema which had previously been housed in the Regal Cinema, Douglas, Isle of Man and this was opened by Charles Smart. The Grand Cinema closed on 2nd July 1966 with Sean Connery in "Thunderball" and Peter Cushing in "Hound of the Baskervilles". It was converted into an independent bingo club, and the Compton organ was played to bingo players at the interval during the first few years. The Grand Cinema last operated as the Stanley Grand Casino, and from 2007 became the Mint Casino, but this was closed by May 2016 and the building is boarded up in early-2017. It is a Grade II listed building. Visited with @albinojay and @GK_WAX a nice easy no bother place this one to trouble or drama. With nice easy local parking. The place is a bit of a death trap with soggy weetabix floors. But enjoyed it was met there by another couple lads @cloth head @scrappy and another lad who's name I didn't get.nice to meet you all. This has been around a while but hasn't had much foot traffic previous post have been in non public so I'll post here. Move if appropriate thanks. AE3A3F7D-13D6-46A2-BBAC-531556536576 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 677196FF-ED07-414A-9EB3-16F7F1686508 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A4BEE354-17D4-43C3-B29B-E949AD22EA21 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 521170FE-A826-4E2B-AE07-F90EB2A17446 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 41F04130-2574-41F5-BAD8-C6637C8C1DBA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C5221223-E490-4DDB-9B64-EB5D1A80F0A0 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A24A62DC-B8F2-4029-A979-D553F1A5F329 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 97FA0434-1D1C-44A2-96E0-89E2C6D61EC6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 352BF5D7-B9D9-4E71-861F-CA6B8AADC650 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 95CC590A-7E8B-4876-A259-F6DCD85E1E93 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5857917C-0368-421B-AF97-4E56B351376E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F8D01375-12B7-4DD2-AF23-E36E812755EA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr CD2C385D-4775-4085-BCAC-E9347EE31B4E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 97ABFA19-6F4F-488A-9F00-9636FFF07634 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/GcMZPQ][/url]ADBDC4A5-0609-4DF9-9D88-135775D61C59 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B34CB251-D300-48EA-B24C-14806915C219 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 78899088-C91D-41E8-ADBE-8B4D02F6E0E6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/23fMZKj][/url]7C7E01B6-72B6-4394-A664-A2188F5B5DBB by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 48BCACC7-F497-4402-911D-BC6A68F8C329 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 10E00DAC-5129-442C-A055-D8E8E6A46B37 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A57EDCE2-17AF-4066-AEBF-742B3DFB10C6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9419402C-5E4F-45DA-BF5D-5706D72749B3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6ACB5984-5895-43ED-82E3-132DE586AC2F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 324F8383-0F17-4D00-AB82-60CE78F340C2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr FF2CBFFB-2962-498A-BEE4-2DE4AB3EB6D8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0FF552D4-1564-48DE-8E48-EFA706588646 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  2. Having seen some older reports on this place and being a sucker for old theatres, it’s one that has always been on my list. Taking the long drive back from work (Bangor to Stockport) I get an email with info that this place is open and doable. I decided to pick @eastyham up and take the 1.5hr trip over to Donny. Ideally I’d of gone during daylight but I didn’t want to miss out on it. So complete darkness it is. Had a bit of bother of some goons who work in the shopping centre but still managed to sneak in another way. Really enjoyed it in here. The floors are mega dodgy towards the front of the building but it is rather lovely along that side where the old dressing rooms are. I particularly loved the fly loft level with the old painted signs and poster remains. History The Doncaster Grand was constructed in 1899 and originally stood on a prominent site in a shopping street facing the main railway station. However, town centre improvements robbed it of any sensible context and it is no longer in a street, but attached rather indirectly to the Frenchgate shopping centre. It still faces the station, however is separated from it by a busy inner ring road which comes so close that it has actually snipped off a lower corner of the stage house. It was threatened with demolition until an energetic local campaign and Friends group secured statutory designation in 1994. The frontage, which, with an improved setting, could again become a local landmark, is three-storeyed. Baroque in treatment, with a complex rhythm of bays articulated by coupled and single pilasters and groupings of arched windows and doorways all rendered. There is a large broken segmental pediment over the three central bays with date 1899. It retains an intimate auditorium. Two well curved balconies with good plasterwork on fronts, the upper gallery is benched. Single pedimented and delicately decorated plasterwork boxes in otherwise plain side walls, flanking a decorative plasterwork rectangular-framed 7.9m (26ft) proscenium. More decorative drops to the ante-proscenium walls, bolection mouldings and plasterwork panels to the stalls and ceiling. Deep central oval ceiling dome. The Grand could quite readily be restored and reopened. It could offer amateur and community drama and musical productions, small scale touring and other activities to complement Doncaster's new venue, Cast. Pics It’s so weird seeing a building as grand as this just surrounded by utter tripe. The old dressing rooms. There was some pipework from the old gas lamps remaining in here. And then the newer porcelain roses with brass? Conduit. This whole side of the building was rotten. It looks like the flat roof bit behind the grand façade is holding water and pissing in when its bad. one of too proper cool dated bar areas. My idea of heaven. A theatre brewdog. For the la la la la LADZ Not sure if this was a ticket or a newspaper clipping? This tiling reminds of any sort of leisure site back when I was a kid. The other bar on the top level. This was suoer cool for me. Not looking good for itself here. Some great art deco styling on the seats. Im guessing this upstairs part was shut off for years whilst it was a bingo hall. LBL? and some old pictures I found on google from when it was a bingo hall.
  3. Welcome to the Grand Hotel S. which was built from 1840 to 1842. It closed its doors in 1999 and is abandoned since. #1 DSC05761 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC05762 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC05763 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC05787 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC05744 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC05745 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC05746 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC05747 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC05748 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC05751 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC05752 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC05753 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC05755 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC05756 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC05766 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC05773 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC05776 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC05777-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC05779 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #20 DSC05771-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #21 DSC05769-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #22 DSC05783-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  4. Hello everyone! Some months ago I went on a trip to Serbia, and thanks to a member of this forum who gave me advice on some locations I was able to do some good urbex in the meantime! Here is my report! (I tried my best searching for info on this place on Serbian websites with the help of Google translate, I hope this is accurate! ) This place is an abandoned luxury hotel in the Sumadija district, Serbia. The palace is very old: it was built between 1868 and 1872 by the prince Mihail Obrenovic, basing on architect Koste Shreplovic’s design. Originally built to be the Serbian National Assembly palace, it became the residence for the Obrenovic dynasty when the Serbian capital was moved from Kragujevac to Beograd. In 1903 a coup took place in Beograd: members of the Obrenovic family were either exiled or killed. But in the following years a railroad was built from the city to Beograd, so the palace became an hotel where all of those who travelled daily from the capital would stay. In 1964 the hotel was sold to a Serbian company, which bankrupted in the early 2000s. In October of 2005 it became property of the government, which tried to sell it but without success. Nowadays it still lays abandoned. The most amazing thing of this palace is the dancing hall: it's just too beautiful! One thing I have to point out is that, even if it has been abandoned since 2005, the building has very little traces of vandalism and it still is in a very good shape. This is exactly the opposite of what happens in Italy. Hope you liked my report guys! I'll see you in the next exploration!
  5. My friend told me about this outdoor pool hidden in the woods and showed me a few pics.i just knew I had to see this.always one for something unusual and different.fast forward a few months and I was travelling back from my last trip to Scotland.i popped in on the way home.i took the stroll through the woods and there it was sunken below in the trees.it is in the grounds of a Manor House.i have no idea when it was built.but it's in a state now.the coloumns around the pool use to have statues on them.you can still see the original tiles and hand rails.it sits in a bit of a sun trap.the pool is filled with natural spring water.which has been been filtered off to feed the pool.the water still flows next to the pool.with holes in the concrete everywhere.i would say this pool was for the more well off.i fell in love with this place.the peace and tranquility was lovely.and can imagine it was grand in its hey day. The pool how it was in the sixties How it looks now from above the water filter system. Bathers steps from the changing rooms The deep end steps Pool lights I would guess this was the diving board frame
  6. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  7. History: The Grand Hotel is a Grade II* listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham, England. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks St Philip’s Cathedral and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012. Before the 1870s, St Philip’s churchyard was surrounded with Georgian terraces. However, as a result of the Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861, the buildings were to be cleared for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. As the leases on the buildings on Colmore Row began to end in the late 1860s, demolition began. Barwick Street was constructed in 1870 and several plots of land bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street were acquired to create the site of the hotel. Isaac Horton, a major Birmingham land and property owner and his architect and builder, Thomson Plevins, were very active in the acquisition of the land and developing it in line with the 1861 Act. Plevins issued three separate contracts for the Colmore Row range of the hotel and construction work started in 1875 on the corner of Church Street. The hotel opened on 1 February 1879, with 100 rooms and a further 60 unfinished at the time of opening. Other facilities included a restaurant with an entrance fronting Church Street, two coffee rooms and stock rooms. The stock rooms were an exhibition space where businessmen could demonstrate their new products and were built as the hotel aimed to attract most of its clients from commercial visitors from out of town. The hotel was let to Arthur Field, a hotel operator from Newcastle upon Tyne. In 1880 the hotel was extended, when the corner of Church Street and Barwick Street was built. The Explore: So we took a spontaneous trip up to Birmingham to check out a few rooftops and we then remembered that the grand hotel was in fact, 2 roads away from where we were planning on going. So we decided to pull an all nighter and find this room; anyway we got in at around 4am and spent a good hour looking for the ballroom (actually it was a nightmare to find); anyway, once we had found it a few of us fell asleep leaving just 2 of us to enjoy its architecture! I find it shocking that this kind of building hasn’t been restored, my photos do it no justice. Anyway we spent about 3 hours taking our photos before stumbling to McDonalds for a well earned bagel and coffee. 100% would revisit. Being tired and hungry we didn't bother checking out the whole site and instead just went straight to the ballroom! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking!
  8. The Visit Visited with redhunter on a lovely summers evening... on reflection I cant believe I actually got in there with the crazy things required to get in and get to the ballroom... Apparently lots of areas internally have been sealed now which made our path to the ball room very dangerous, anyone that attempts this in the future will know what I mean when they meet a big locked gate inside.. but once in I was literally speechless, what an incredible room that is !! The History The Grand Hotel is a Grade 2 listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1874. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012
  9. Just one of those places i had to go and see for myself... copy n' paste history courtesy of historic england HISTORY: The Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861 cleared the way for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. The Great Western Railway had built Snow Hill Station in 1853, close by, and this was rebuilt in 1870. Leases on the Georgian properties in Colmore Row began to fall in by the 1860s and demolition started in 1870. A new road, Barwick Street, behind Colmore Row, was constructed in the 1870s with frontages which were mostly of brick and stone. Several separate plots of land were acquired to create the site of the current hotel which takes up the greater part of the block bounded by Colmore Row, Barwick Street, Church Street and Livery Street. Isaac Horton and Thomson Plevins, who was to become his architect, were both active in acquiring land and developing it in line with the improvements in the 1861 Act. The Colmore Row frontage was theirs by 1875, although the right hand portion came fully into their hands a little later. Thomson Plevins was architect and he issued three separate contracts for the building of the Colmore Row front and work started with the pavilion at the corner with Church Street. Next it extended to the right as far as the central pavilion. Lastly the balancing range and corner pavilion completed the symmetrical composition. The hotel opened in 1879 and a contemporary advertisement referred to "Commercial rooms, stock rooms and every convenience for commercial men... large rooms for dinners, weddings, breakfasts, meetings, arbitrations etc." There were 100 bedrooms, with 60 more unfinished at the time of opening, a restaurant with separate entrance in Church Street and 2 coffee rooms. The inclusion of Stock Rooms, where businessmen could demonstrate their products to each other, shows that the hotel was directed towards this market. Placed near to Snow Hill Station, the hotel aimed to attract commercial visitors from out of town. In the early 1880s the corner site on Church Street and Barwick Street was added to the hotel with a building of four storeys plus basement which was extended in 1894 by another 3 storeys. Also in the 1880s another large plot of land facing on to Barwick Street and Livery Street and turning the corner to connect with the Colmore Row facade was developed with a 5 storey block, called Great Western Buildings, of which a 4-bay section now survives on Barwick Street and is part of the hotel. In 1890, before the end of the lease the hotel appears to have failed and the building was handed back to the landlords. Hortons' Estates decided to re-order the interior of the Grand and newspaper reports spoke of £40,000 spent by the prominent Birmingham architects, Martin and Chamberlain. The Birmingham Daily Post recorded the hotel as "entirely reconstructed, decorated and furnished" and the Midland Counties Herald wrote that "although the external walls are retained, there is practically a new building on the old site, and all that remains of the old building is the facade on Colmore Row". The contractors were Barnsley and Son of Ryland Street North and the building was furnished and decorated by Norton and Co. of Corporation St. There was electric lighting to the public rooms and gas in the bedrooms. As well as the Stock Rooms and an arbitration suite there was a series of reception rooms called the Windsor Suite and a banqueting and ballroom. The grandest of all the reception rooms was built in 1894 when Martin and Chamberlain were asked to fill the remaining gap along the Barwick side of the site. They built a large new ballroom called the Grosvenor Room, together with a Drawing Room, arched internal colonnade and crush hall. The architects' drawings show that the ballroom was designed as a shell and the elaborate decoration was entrusted to decorators [perhaps Norton and Co. once more]. Five upper floors contained 75 new bedrooms. Other alterations at this time included 2 additional billiard rooms in the hotel basement. In the 1970s the architects Harper and Sperring undertook a modernisation of the interior and the exterior stone work on the Colmore Row and Church Street fronts was painted with a cement wash. The inclusion of rooms designed to appeal to businessmen was paralleled at the City Terminus Hotel, Cannon Street, London and the Caledonian Hotel, Glasgow. Amongst listed hotels in London, the Grosvenor, Buckingham Palace Road, the Russell, Russell Square are comparable in date and in their provision of grand public spaces, as is the former Midland Grand Hotel, Euston Road [grade I]and the Midland Hotel, Peter Street, Manchester [grade II*]. The Grand Hotel block forms one of the largest C19 buildings in central Birmingham. Within the overall urban context, and most particularly within its immediate neighbourhood, it makes a very positive and well-mannered contribution to the townscape. Placed in close proximity to James Archer's magnificent Church of St Philip [now the Cathedral], it achieves the difficult task of not dominating its smaller neighbour but still retaining individuality, most particularly by its distinctive skyline. The Barwick Street façade of the block designed in 1894 by Martin and Chamberlain is a fine work by this noted practice and shows an assured and interesting handling of masses. Inside are some especially fine original interiors including the principal staircase and, most notably, the rich and impressive French style decoration of the Grosvenor Room, Grosvenor Drawing Room and Crush Room. Elsewhere there is evidence of the Stock Rooms, which were an essential part of the original commercial accent of the hotel, as well as the rare survival of the shop interior at the Anatomical Boot Co.,25 Colmore Row. The special qualities of this building merit its listing at II*. oooh how original, a corridor with lots of light/dark contrast Even the building work that was never seen was cooler back then! seriously awesome studwork and this was the main reason for being here - The Grosvenor room needless to say the black and white below isnt my shot! these however are mine. one last look on the way out thanks for looking, take it sleazy kids.
  10. So 2014 ended rather well exploring wise for me. Last day exploring of the year and I cracked this, the fails later didn't really matter History blatantly stolen from Wikipedia: The Grand Hotel is a Grade ii listed hotel in the city centre of Birmingham. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks the cathederal and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin and Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. I had come up with a couple of rather nice leads one you may of already seen on here a few weeks ago. I felt that my luck was in so I gave this lil beauty a shot. 3 am on my own I took the long drive to Birmingham. Upon arrival I wandered round and realised this was certainly no walk in!! Eventualy I was in unsure if I had full access as the heating was still on I went for a wander. I couldn't believe it I was in!! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. I am wandering around and for the life of me can't find what I came for, stripped room after stripped room. I take a seat on the stairs I need some help. Who else to ask but Google. I work out where the room is only to find padlocks and boarded up doorways. Eventually going up and down stairs I reach my goal. I give you the Grosvenor Room. 7. The problems not over yet. This is a tiny balcony and I am unsure on the strenght of the metal decoration. I have another wander and have no luck on finding any access. Heading back to the balcony I find some rope. I tie a few hoops into it and tie it to the balcony. Finally I am on the floor and I can enjoy this stunning room properly. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.
  11. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
  12. Stumbled across this place by accident at the weekend I only hade my trusty phone camera with me so here is the results. Thanks for looking...
  13. Evening all, End of the first day and we thought we’d pay this place a visit as we knew it was a brief stop and was well decayed. Did the usual and parked in a little side street away from the place. We walked towards it and as I took one step towards the gap in the cornfield, I looked to the right and saw an old woman walking down who immediately spotted what we were up to and went into her house and watched us out the window. It appears others had seen us too. I spotted a small gap in the hedge off the road so we walked back to the car and had a rest for 10 minutes before going straight for it and not hanging about when traffic was quiet. Don’t have the history but there was some heavy decay going on here. I heard from one person that the house was going to be destroyed soon. A few photos were taken but some rooms were filled up with stuff or the roof had caved in. Not good for three big guys but we managed half hour and left to drive to Chambre De Commerce for a late night looksee. On with the photos. Thanks for looking in.
  14. Situated in a beautiful valley on the banks of a majestic river this abandoned hotel looks forlorn and out of place with the well-kept houses along the same road.. So..in true British style we parked right outside and bundled out of the car..the trouble with exploring with 6 other people is everyone wants to be first in..it was like rats leaving a sinking ship! After negotiating a squeeze into the basement we were in…only to find that the main floor had been stolen! Amazing really…what were they trying to get at ? Still the upper floors remained in pretty good condition. Looks like a few people have used it as a stopover on urbex missions..there were even some beds made up!.. Shame the weather wasn’t on our side as the views were delightful. Eventually some old codger peered through the window and told us to bugger off…well that’s what we thought he said..our Belgium isn’t that good..the word “Police†was easily translated though… It’s up for sale if anyone wants to buy it ! Hello....Room Service ! you have not made my bed up..where is my complimentary mint and condom ! Flowers and wine.. Vin de Table The elegant screen which hid the dirty kitchen.. Such beautiful sinks in a toilet ! The carpets, wall paper and general colour theme were well trippy in this place ! The blue corridor.. The mattress really went with that wallpaper ! Play a song for me.. The lonely jug locked away in the attic.. Careful! there is a small hole in the floor ! It was a great location..hope you enjoyed the selection of pics.
  15. Visited with non Member Dan Quik bit of History about this incredible Structure; Set back to one side of Snargate Street, Dover, its entrance barred by iron gates is a sloping corridor which leads to the Grand Shaft, a unique 19th Century triple staircase built during the Napoleonic Wars. Brief DescriptionThe shaft is an ingenious construction of brick measuring 26 feet (8 metres) in diameter and 140 feet (42 metres) in height. It was built between 1806 – 1809. It has three staircases of Purbeck limestone which wind clockwise one above the other down a central brick light and ventilation shaft lit by an occasional window. At the bottom the three staircases meet in the sloping corridor which leads to Snargate Street. There are 200 steps in all separated by several landings. And for a few of my Pics Was a great Night out Really enjoyed myself, well worth a look
  16. Built to move troops from the Western Heights barracks to the bottom of the cliff at Dover, it consists of a triple spiral staircase. Visited a couple of times over the week, firstly with everyone on the first day, and secondly with fluff and later maniac to play with fluffs great colour gems Hope ya like the pics
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