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Found 102 results

  1. A 4 star hotel than left to shine, was used as a presidential suite shelter for Muammar Gaddafi in past. Today, is one of the firts stops for sirian citizens trying to enter Europe. Welcome to Jerma Palace Hotel. FULL REPORT: http://the-lostsouls.blogspot.com.es/2016/02/jerma-palace-hotel_8.html
  2. Interesting explore this “local†one was, I was amazed to find majority of the furniture and appliances still stored inside! Unfortunately our visit was cut short after setting the alarms off one too many times, so not many picture… not that anyone actually arrived, however we thought we had pushed our luck a little too much already. Here’s what little history I can find on the place. Set in a 17th-century country house, this conservative hotel is 2.2 miles from Harlow Mill train station and 7.3 miles from the Rhodes Arts Complex. The traditional rooms feature TVs, en suite bathrooms, and tea and coffeemaking equipment. There are 8 function rooms, verdant gardens and a restaurant with garden views on-site, plus a spa and leisure centre with a gym, an indoor pool and a sauna.
  3. The Visit Visited with redhunter on a lovely summers evening... on reflection I cant believe I actually got in there with the crazy things required to get in and get to the ballroom... Apparently lots of areas internally have been sealed now which made our path to the ball room very dangerous, anyone that attempts this in the future will know what I mean when they meet a big locked gate inside.. but once in I was literally speechless, what an incredible room that is !! The History The Grand Hotel is a Grade 2 listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1874. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012
  4. History: The Grand Hotel is a Grade II* listed Victorian hotel in the city centre of Birmingham, England. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks St Philip’s Cathedral and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin & Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. The hotel closed in 2002 and due to the risk of crumbling stonework it has been under scaffolding and protective covers since. In 2012 planning permission was granted for plans to restore the building into a luxury 152-bedroom hotel. Works to the exterior began in October 2012. Before the 1870s, St Philip’s churchyard was surrounded with Georgian terraces. However, as a result of the Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861, the buildings were to be cleared for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. As the leases on the buildings on Colmore Row began to end in the late 1860s, demolition began. Barwick Street was constructed in 1870 and several plots of land bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street were acquired to create the site of the hotel. Isaac Horton, a major Birmingham land and property owner and his architect and builder, Thomson Plevins, were very active in the acquisition of the land and developing it in line with the 1861 Act. Plevins issued three separate contracts for the Colmore Row range of the hotel and construction work started in 1875 on the corner of Church Street. The hotel opened on 1 February 1879, with 100 rooms and a further 60 unfinished at the time of opening. Other facilities included a restaurant with an entrance fronting Church Street, two coffee rooms and stock rooms. The stock rooms were an exhibition space where businessmen could demonstrate their new products and were built as the hotel aimed to attract most of its clients from commercial visitors from out of town. The hotel was let to Arthur Field, a hotel operator from Newcastle upon Tyne. In 1880 the hotel was extended, when the corner of Church Street and Barwick Street was built. The Explore: So we took a spontaneous trip up to Birmingham to check out a few rooftops and we then remembered that the grand hotel was in fact, 2 roads away from where we were planning on going. So we decided to pull an all nighter and find this room; anyway we got in at around 4am and spent a good hour looking for the ballroom (actually it was a nightmare to find); anyway, once we had found it a few of us fell asleep leaving just 2 of us to enjoy its architecture! I find it shocking that this kind of building hasn’t been restored, my photos do it no justice. Anyway we spent about 3 hours taking our photos before stumbling to McDonalds for a well earned bagel and coffee. 100% would revisit. Being tired and hungry we didn't bother checking out the whole site and instead just went straight to the ballroom! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking!
  5. My first repo on here! Once upon a time, near a big city there was this big wealthy hotel/restaurant, full of chique guests, expensive food such as lobster and glamorous rooms. After the business went bankrupt, the owners couldn't find anyone who had interest to buy it from them. So now, nature is slowly taking over the grounds again. The exploring itself: After tumbling into the basement (I'm gracefull like that.. ) , we came into this huge wine cellar. Now let me tell you, I absolutely don't like basements, I always try my best to avoid them when I don't need to be in there. When we finally got upstairs, I was kinda suprised how dark some parts of the building were, while other couldn't be more open and alight. I absolutely loved what was left of the old glamour. When we were about to leave the building, the rest of our team wanted to go down the basement one last time, so I moved along on my own a little bit.. they came out a little bit creeped out but still laughing, apparently they came across another man down there; whose only words there: This would be perfect for SM. And disappeared Loved this part with the little wedding-ish look! Detail from the ceiling of the previous picture The corridor to the guest rooms. And last but not least; A picture of the wine cellar!
  6. This is somewhat of a peculiar one! When this huge building was constructed in the middle of the 20th Century it began it's life as a hotel, in a great location by a beautiful river. As time went on and the fortunes of the city changed, the hotel business dried up due to declining clientele and it was bought by a nursing home company who decided to transform the former hotel into a sprawling 178-room care facility for the elderly and adults with special needs. In the basement were office and conference facilities as well as local TV and radio studios, and these vacated not long after the nursing home shut down. This place has rarely been explored before, it's always been sealed tight whenever my friend has checked it out. We were walking past it on the way back from somewhere else late in the afternoon and took a little detour through the site and the first thing I spotted once off the street was a wide open access point. It was too late and the building too large to explore with the daylight we had left so early doors the next morning we headed back inside. It's got a lot to see inside but as you can imagine with the size of the building and it's use it gets quite samey after a while. There is also evidence of recent squatters living inside in a couple of the rooms. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157659760861955
  7. History The site on which the Park International Hotel now sits on was originally occupied by a footwear warehouse, for Freeman Hardy & Willis Ltd. The site, like others across the city, also included lodgings for the company director and caretaker. By 1940, however, the warehouse had been completely destroyed by the Luftwaffe, after one of the heaviest bombing raids Leicester would ever experience during the war. Since much of the city was damaged in the aftermath, and more important redevelopment projects took priority, the site remained an abandoned wasteland up until 1955. The area was purchased and cleared of debris, although it wasn’t until the early 1970s that the main tower would appear on the city’s horizon. Like others at the time, such as Hallam Towers in Sheffield, the new property was designed to be a modern development that paid tribute to an era of prosperity. Nonetheless, as with most hotels, it changed hands several times throughout its lifetime and each time it was renamed accordingly. It is estimated that it remained as the Park International Hotel for the longest period of time. Over the years the hotel was a popular venue and it attracted many guests from other parts of the country. It was perhaps for this reason why the lower levels of the hotel were used to house the Leicester Exhibition Centre from the 1980s onward. The building finally closed down in 2009 owing to its declining reputation and inadequate structural integrity. During the 2000s there were several incidents where concrete had fallen from the structure onto the street below. Despite plans to repair the decaying premises, so that it could perhaps be converted into residential or student accommodation, no plans were ever approved. As the building has stood in a dilapidated state for many years, it has become too dangerous for property redevelopers to enter. Future plans now involve demolishing the site, to make way for new innovative city projects. Our Version of Events With only a few hours before Punk had to retire for the night *curfew – cough*, we decided that we’d still have time for a quick raid on the old Park International Hotel site. We’d heard rumours that access was particularly interesting so it caught our attention almost instantly. We’d also been itching to see Leicester from somewhere high. On the whole access wasn’t particularly difficult, but it was definitely entertaining. Inside, the hotel is absolutely fucked, so that was a little disappointing. Nevertheless, the rooftop view from the tower didn’t disappoint at all. From up there we could see for miles; it was just a shame we weren’t able to see it with all the lights switched on. Explored with Ford Mayhem, KM_Punk and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  8. Another place I visited a year ago with Obscurity and 2 non members, an old hotel with a huge car lot and garage for repairs. Don't ask me why it's called Hotel B, I have no idea. Access was ridiculous, how nobody called the police on us is beyond me. Some nice features in this hotel and a few interesting bits and pieces out the back in the parking lot. Oh and a dead cat, like really really dead! No idea about the history, I'll let the pics tell the story. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Miaaaoooowwwww
  9. Italy noms. On arrival here we began to doubt if we'd gain entry as it looked like things had changed around the perimeter of the building. Our original access wasn't looking possible, but persistence paid off and we got to see this gigantic place The main highlight of the hotel is the ballroom and there are also a couple of nicer rooms Around there too. I spent most of my time downstairs, didn't really bother to shoot the rest as I'd expected it to be repetitive and boring as most hotels are once above the lower floors. Anyway, photos: Cheers, SM
  10. Did this location on our trip in august through North Italy. One of the highlights on our trip, we did it in the very early morning, because we had a tight schedule that day. Could have easily killed a few hours in there, but after two hours we had to go... Thanks for watching
  11. Keeping this one quiet, though has been closed for quite some time sitting in plain sight for a lot of Hertfordshire folk. That’s the only clue I am giving ? I checked this place out twice a while back and found no access points, but after returning with the usual urbex family and finding a somewhat rickety ladder, we found our way in! Once again on the same day as our QE2 splore, another one with power still on!
  12. The large hotel with several accommodation wings and surrounded by an old park was built in the nineteen-twenties. The spa centre in the hotel used water which was particularly rich in mineral salts. The Hotel was closed about 2007. It took a while until we found an open access. After about four hours, workers (or whoever, two men in white coats) came into the building and we had to get out quickly, but we have not been seen. But, unfortunately, therefore we could not explore everything inside. Part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
  13. Yup thats right ANOTHER alla italia report, same ceilings, same pillars, same copper bath rar rar rar. always loved the look of this place and was fairly near the top of the list for our little roadtrip, have to say as beautiful and grande the place looks its a shame its all fake as shit!, on the way over raw told me about the "painted ceilings" peeling away at the corners which says its obviously a print, the balcony railings are plastic and the pillars are marbled plaster-which to be fair faux marbling is a skill in itself, basically its a painting technique which involves applying the paint with a feather to imitate the veins in marble. fake or not it's still a very photogenic building, unfortunately i was wielding a pissed lens so i had to make do taking pics at weird angles until jane was done and could lend me hers to do some symmetrical stuff. previously a health spa in the centre of a rather posh town in belgium, as far as i know plans are for it to be turned into a hotel. -highly recommend the gorgonzola steak at the italian joint over the road on with the picturegraphs thanks for looking kids, rave hard but rave safe.
  14. I visited this place 3 times now and every time I saw new spots Maybe because the keeper is always moving things... Anyway, it's a good place to visit for a few bucks He is a really friendly guy and he always give you something to eat after your visit. You also can rent a room for a night! So here are some pics
  15. A great hotel in Germany. I already visited it about 20 times; I saw the change of it. Most rooms are already trashed or demolished, but there are also some nice spots in there Never go in there without a good mask! Too much mould, it isn't healthy at all. The building burned already two times and that's the reason for the decay. The owner has left Germany and nobody knows what will happen to it. It's a question of time. Now have fun with my new pics! Sorry for the bad quality, I don't know how to upload without loosing quality At first #3 pics I already edited
  16. Deep in Germany we found this beauty sleeping. The color of decay are so awesome .
  17. Mini rooftop hotel Germany by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Mini rooftop hotel Germany by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr Mini rooftop hotel Germany by Vancolen Kevin, on Flickr
  18. Already very broken and also difficult to photograph around the graffitis (partly I've retouched them). 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  19. Hi there, today I want to show you some shots of an lost Hotel. Locatet in the former GDR, it was an luxury Object in the GDR-Times. After that it continued as an upper class Hotel with a very good reputation. Now it´s closed since this year and empty, waiting to be torn apart. Well secured and guarded by security it´s neraly impossible to get in. we had the exclusive chance to take some pictures. Hopy you´ll enjoy them.
  20. The Hotel closed in January 2015 due to running at a loss and bad reviews. It has since been sold onto a retirement home developer. Not an amazing explore but the bathroom was cleaner then most peoples and even has running water and a flushing toilet! Below is a few bits of information about the hotel: Inside New Forest National Park and a 2-minute walk from bike rentals, this old-school hotel is in a sprawling Victorian-style building on 5 acres. It's a 3-minute walk from multiple shopping and dining options on High Street. This 3-star hotel is situated between Southampton and Bournemouth. The hotel has 59 individually decorated bedrooms, all en-suite, in a choice of standard or premier room. Each room comes with a number of facilities to make guest's stay as comfortable as possible. Closure: http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/11607497.Shock_over_hotel_closure_announcement/ Thank You!
  21. Just one of those places i had to go and see for myself... copy n' paste history courtesy of historic england HISTORY: The Second Birmingham Improvement Act of 1861 cleared the way for the redevelopment of Colmore Row. The Great Western Railway had built Snow Hill Station in 1853, close by, and this was rebuilt in 1870. Leases on the Georgian properties in Colmore Row began to fall in by the 1860s and demolition started in 1870. A new road, Barwick Street, behind Colmore Row, was constructed in the 1870s with frontages which were mostly of brick and stone. Several separate plots of land were acquired to create the site of the current hotel which takes up the greater part of the block bounded by Colmore Row, Barwick Street, Church Street and Livery Street. Isaac Horton and Thomson Plevins, who was to become his architect, were both active in acquiring land and developing it in line with the improvements in the 1861 Act. The Colmore Row frontage was theirs by 1875, although the right hand portion came fully into their hands a little later. Thomson Plevins was architect and he issued three separate contracts for the building of the Colmore Row front and work started with the pavilion at the corner with Church Street. Next it extended to the right as far as the central pavilion. Lastly the balancing range and corner pavilion completed the symmetrical composition. The hotel opened in 1879 and a contemporary advertisement referred to "Commercial rooms, stock rooms and every convenience for commercial men... large rooms for dinners, weddings, breakfasts, meetings, arbitrations etc." There were 100 bedrooms, with 60 more unfinished at the time of opening, a restaurant with separate entrance in Church Street and 2 coffee rooms. The inclusion of Stock Rooms, where businessmen could demonstrate their products to each other, shows that the hotel was directed towards this market. Placed near to Snow Hill Station, the hotel aimed to attract commercial visitors from out of town. In the early 1880s the corner site on Church Street and Barwick Street was added to the hotel with a building of four storeys plus basement which was extended in 1894 by another 3 storeys. Also in the 1880s another large plot of land facing on to Barwick Street and Livery Street and turning the corner to connect with the Colmore Row facade was developed with a 5 storey block, called Great Western Buildings, of which a 4-bay section now survives on Barwick Street and is part of the hotel. In 1890, before the end of the lease the hotel appears to have failed and the building was handed back to the landlords. Hortons' Estates decided to re-order the interior of the Grand and newspaper reports spoke of £40,000 spent by the prominent Birmingham architects, Martin and Chamberlain. The Birmingham Daily Post recorded the hotel as "entirely reconstructed, decorated and furnished" and the Midland Counties Herald wrote that "although the external walls are retained, there is practically a new building on the old site, and all that remains of the old building is the facade on Colmore Row". The contractors were Barnsley and Son of Ryland Street North and the building was furnished and decorated by Norton and Co. of Corporation St. There was electric lighting to the public rooms and gas in the bedrooms. As well as the Stock Rooms and an arbitration suite there was a series of reception rooms called the Windsor Suite and a banqueting and ballroom. The grandest of all the reception rooms was built in 1894 when Martin and Chamberlain were asked to fill the remaining gap along the Barwick side of the site. They built a large new ballroom called the Grosvenor Room, together with a Drawing Room, arched internal colonnade and crush hall. The architects' drawings show that the ballroom was designed as a shell and the elaborate decoration was entrusted to decorators [perhaps Norton and Co. once more]. Five upper floors contained 75 new bedrooms. Other alterations at this time included 2 additional billiard rooms in the hotel basement. In the 1970s the architects Harper and Sperring undertook a modernisation of the interior and the exterior stone work on the Colmore Row and Church Street fronts was painted with a cement wash. The inclusion of rooms designed to appeal to businessmen was paralleled at the City Terminus Hotel, Cannon Street, London and the Caledonian Hotel, Glasgow. Amongst listed hotels in London, the Grosvenor, Buckingham Palace Road, the Russell, Russell Square are comparable in date and in their provision of grand public spaces, as is the former Midland Grand Hotel, Euston Road [grade I]and the Midland Hotel, Peter Street, Manchester [grade II*]. The Grand Hotel block forms one of the largest C19 buildings in central Birmingham. Within the overall urban context, and most particularly within its immediate neighbourhood, it makes a very positive and well-mannered contribution to the townscape. Placed in close proximity to James Archer's magnificent Church of St Philip [now the Cathedral], it achieves the difficult task of not dominating its smaller neighbour but still retaining individuality, most particularly by its distinctive skyline. The Barwick Street façade of the block designed in 1894 by Martin and Chamberlain is a fine work by this noted practice and shows an assured and interesting handling of masses. Inside are some especially fine original interiors including the principal staircase and, most notably, the rich and impressive French style decoration of the Grosvenor Room, Grosvenor Drawing Room and Crush Room. Elsewhere there is evidence of the Stock Rooms, which were an essential part of the original commercial accent of the hotel, as well as the rare survival of the shop interior at the Anatomical Boot Co.,25 Colmore Row. The special qualities of this building merit its listing at II*. oooh how original, a corridor with lots of light/dark contrast Even the building work that was never seen was cooler back then! seriously awesome studwork and this was the main reason for being here - The Grosvenor room needless to say the black and white below isnt my shot! these however are mine. one last look on the way out thanks for looking, take it sleazy kids.
  22. 1. Birds Hotel 01 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 2. Birds Hotel 02 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 3. Birds Hotel 03 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 4. Birds Hotel 04 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 5. Birds Hotel 05 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 6. Birds Hotel 06 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 7. Birds Hotel 07 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 8. Birds Hotel 08 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr 9. Birds Hotel 09 by Miaro Digital, auf Flickr
  23. The Abandoned Hotel Thermal aka Hotel Des Theremes is a derelict hotel rotting away somewhere in France. The hotel complex is quite large and we only managed to explore one of the main buildings, what appeared to be accommodation area and recreational areas. The complex specialised in ‘healing baths’ targeted towards the elderly. I understand that nearby hot springs were used to provide some of the water used to bath the elderly customers and these springs were said to have had special healing properties. I’m unsure exactly when the buildings closed but by the looks of the decay and the very limited documents left behind my best guess would be the late 1990 to early 2000’s. The site also houses an apparently active laundry service of some description with several large white lorries parked outside and chimneys venting steam on a regular basis. There was another large building across from the one we photographed that looked really interesting featuring large sweeping curved walls, we are unsure of what was inside but the building also appeared abandoned. Visited this abandoned hotel with Matt Kriegaffe Hampshire, Scott Darby and Andy K, we arrived late in the day after a relatively unsuccessful morning we had very little time to explore this place before we were due to leave for our train home. Sadly it took us longer to find a way inside than we had to spare so after a quick chat we decided to miss our departure time and go for a later shuttle. I’m really glad we made that choice as this place was a lot more impressive from the inside than it looked from its dreary grey concrete exterior. Once inside we were almost immediately greeted by 2 long rooms, the first featuring a large circular skylight reflecting nicely in puddles of water on the floor. Next door was a beautiful long blue ballroom or dining room with mirrors at either end and decorative ceiling plaster. Then came the main staircase in the entrance hall going up 3 levels with a red carpet covering it was pretty photogenic. On the first floor we accidentally stumbled across a large nesting area for well over 100 bats which after a few flew past us we left well alone . Other than the grand features downstairs and in the main entrance there was a lot of empty corridors and empty bedrooms at this place striped over all their contents and fixtures. One or 2 bathrooms remained and we found what appeared to be a chapel that was unfortunately sealed off from the building we had access to. All in all a pleasurable explore around this place, well worth the 2 hour delay we had getting home! Enjoy the photos: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Thanks for checking out the report higher res copies of the above photos can be found on my blog: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2014/10/19/urbex-hotel-thermale-france-june-2014/
  24. A few older photos (summer 2010) of an abandoned hotel from the 20s in Sweden. Although the quality of the images is not the best, but I think the place is worth to be shown. part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
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