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Found 213 results

  1. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
  2. With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  3. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  4. A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
  5. This is a classic mooch from a little while back, only never got around to actually reporting it anywhere! This site is now completely redeveloped, so no chance of future explores unfortunately HISTORY Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent. The hospital has been closed since 2007 amd has since been under redevelopment into flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. AERIAL VIEW THE EXPLORE - 14.3.2012 With a little pointer from a 'contact' we were able to enjoy an explore without too much interruption. The builders were obviously having a lay in, as it wasnt until after lunchtime that they started getting suspitious! By then we'd got most of our shots and made a stealthy retreat! THE PHOTOS THANKS FOR LOOKING!! And finally! Who can you spot left in the dust?!
  6. this house always interested me..the yard was filled with junk..old cars..and other junk..it gave the appearence of being abandoned but someone clearly lived there the area became prime real estate..mcmansions went up and taxes went up..i knew this houses wouldent last....i went by and saw it was finally empty the 1st floor was a neat gloomy house rooms that feel like a horror movie all the lights hung poorly..surpised there wasent a fir from them.. see more of that in a bit upstairs' the upstairs was nthing but an attic...no bedrooms or bathroom..this was a single floor home.. basement a wood burning heater...thats an old way to heat a house the last thing still hanging that shows the personality of the owner odd old stained glass not sure what that is... ..the dead and prarie home companion There are a few male voices caught inside one seems like another lanuage
  7. So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  8. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  9. History As far as history goes for this particular property, it is sparse as it is nothing more than a fairly modern residential building. One newspaper based in Barnsley reported that traffic came to a standstill as a result of a fire at the property on Rotherham Road. Two fire crews attended the scene and spent two-and-a-half hours extinguishing the blaze. A second source suggests that the fire was caused by a lit candle, and that a woman had a lucky escape. The woman concerned apparently suffered slight smoke inhalation but was otherwise in good health. The property itself is an average sized two-storey house. Its notable features include an indoor swimming pool and a spiral staircase. Our Version of Events Of all the places we could end up in, we ended up in Barnsley. After looking at the town hall and wandering around the town and its meat and fish market for half an hour it didn’t take long to run out of things to do, so we decided we might as well look for an explore. However, the best thing we could find, unfortunately, was an old burnt down house. We tried a couple of other spots beforehand but didn’t have much luck overall. The house on Rotherham Road is exactly what you might expect for a residential explore – mostly empty and damp. As noted above, though, it does feature an indoor swimming pool where you can try your hand at floating across on doors someone has thrown in. Needless to say, we weren’t very successful but it was certainly worth a quick go. The second bit of the building that’s worth a look at is the spiral staircase in what we think was the former living room. This room was the most photogenic part of the explore so we spent most of our time in here. Going up the staircase turned out to be a complete waste of time because this is where the fire was. There is very little left of the roof and most of the floorboards look rather fucked. Compared to the mansions and castles of Belgium and France, then, this explore is a big disappointment, but it does kill fifteen minutes if you happen to be passing and fancy a swim. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9:
  10. The chateau is one of the many large abandoned houses that can be found around France. Built in the 1700s by the lord of the village it is within, the house has been modified and expanded over the years. The vaulted basement contains a full size snooker table below the original arched ceiling. A large stone fireplace is the centre-point of a sitting area to one end of the basement. The front entrance opens directly to a small stone staircase, leading up to the main living areas which are slightly raised from ground level, or down to the basement. Visited with @SpiderMonkey
  11. Hello, not sure on the full history of the place. I have found a little bit of information from Google. Great little house with a shop at the front. Loads of things left inside. The Butcher’s Home – Belgium An abandoned butchers house in Belgium. There lived a family of 10 people! a father and a mother and 4 boys and 4 girls. The home was abandoned in 1994 and left ever since! Thanks for looking!
  12. Recently, I´ve visited "Mold House". Of course, more than well-known. When I first set my eyes on pictures of that house with its amazing colours and its state of decay, I instantly fell in love. I´m glad I could fulfill my dream of visiting that place. I especially loved the pink colour of the armchairs being sokaed into the carpet.
  13. An abandoned house along a Belgian road. The house was partly destroyed by a fire and the former owner now resides with family. Some family member comes by occasionaly to feed the stray cats. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
  14. I don't post very much here on Oblivion State, So I thought I'd best start posting a bit more. Be warned this is going to be a picture heavy one. History I'm being purposefully vague as this place needs protecting from the cretins that unfortunately will take joy in ruining such a delightful property. 'Punch Lodge' as I'm calling it, was used by a large business as a management training facility. It had accommodation for the people attending the training courses, presumably running for several days or weeks at a time. The Lodge has roughly 20 rooms for accommodation, as well as lounge, bar and dining room areas. It also has a lovely round shed, swimming pool and a tennis court. It was used from at least 1980 and closed down in around 2007. I'm still trying to find more information about it, and I'll add any new information I find as an edit here. The Explore So like many of my finds, this was a Google Maps spot that I decided to go check out on the off chance. Normally with these things its a gamble as it's either been converted, knocked down, sealed up or was never derelict at all. I had a good feeling about this one though. As I approached it I could see a building over the fence, and what looked like a couple broken window panes. Carefully wandering down the overgrown path, I was presented with a big messy courtyard and the front of the lodge. There was a couple fire extinguishers chucked on the ground, the usual sign that kids had been in messing around. Access was simply an open door, so an excellent start already. Exploring from room to room, I was flabbergasted what I was seeing, the house was pristine! It almost was too good, I was expecting for an alarm to go off at any moment and the fuzz to show up. The house has 2 floors plus a 2nd floor loft conversion (with roof access too!). To my surprise the power was still on. Many of the lights still worked. A good amount of the rooms were filled full of crap, almost as if they were using it as storage. I found a few offices with lots of paperwork left. It was mostly tax returns and business related documents. Obviously the house was used to run a business from, but there was quite a few different business names to the address. However now that I know it was used for business and management training it makes a little more sense. I headed outside to explore the surrounding land. After fighting through brambles and trees I found a very full up swimming pool and the tennis court. I did a bit of research once I got home and found that there were numerous businesses that still had this address as its registered office. I don't have a very good knowledge of the inner works of running a business, but to have a registered office as the address of derelict property seems a bit naughty to me. Photos Externals This is the main courtyard area. You can see piles of rubbish and fire extinguishers that have been chucked about. Internals The main lobby area was pristine. This is the main door and porch area. The lounge area. The bar area used as storage for furniture. The dinning room The kitchen with everything left untouched once again. The downstairs office with lots of paperwork still left. Lots of silverware stuffed into a case?! This looks like it was used as a training room Upstairs. The long corridor with lots of bedrooms. A few of the rooms looked like they were being renovated. A few were being used for storage. Most had the same bright orange curtains. Bit of Sangria anyone? Another office type area, except I spotted something interesting in here. A CCTV monitor that was in standby mode. I hit the power button and all 4 cameras had VIDEO LOSS, so either they weren't set up properly or someone has disconnected them. The top floor consisted of a big bedroom with en-suite bathroom. Adding to the fun, there was roof access from one of the windows! Outside area By the corner of the house was a round shed that had a fantastic ceiling. The woodlands behind the house is very overgrown and it was a struggle to fight through the foliage to find anything. Found the swimming pool! Almost stepping right in as rain water had filled it to ground level. The tennis court. Thanks for reading.
  15. Hi everybody! This is a little adventure in a house full of old toys. Hope you enjoy...
  16. I've driven past this place many times but only recently realised it was empty as I passed it on a day out to explore, I know nothing of its history but deduce it's been empty around 5 years according to magazines found inside. It's situated in Mid Wales on a main road and the gardens are quite overgrown, thankfully this time of year the greenery is manageable! All doors were closed but thankfully one of them wasn't locked. There is also an outbuilding next door which I didn't have time to check out properly to see if there was access, next time maybe. Thanks for looking.
  17. I visited here with Brewtal from over at DP. Thanks for showing us around this place, it was great! Hope you like the drone video. This former manor house was used for Chemical and Optical work. The History for this place is pretty sketchy and I can't anything on it. Its being redeveloped into housing and part of the structure has been emptied and will be demolished. The main house is remaining to be redeveloped from what I understand. The roof is completely missing and has been covered completely by a scaffold roof. The top floor is very surreal because of this. The drone video! https://youtu.be/kZJJd8V4OD0 Thanks for reading!
  18. A very interesting house but unfortunately in very bad shape. 1 2 3 4 5
  19. A small house with some furniture. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  20. This was the first stop when we spent the day around Sheffield, 5 tried 5 entered. History - Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. Waingate in 1857: the Old Town Hall with its first clock tower on the left The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk.
  21. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  22. after another explore my self and the elusive spotted this place while driving to our second place of the day, we never made it but that will be another day now the house has been unoccupied from 2005-6 from what I could work out , there was a collection of old dumpers in the overgrown garden and a few bits left in the house on with some pics thanks for looking more on my flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157663406796301
  23. The last location I did in 2015. It's not really a chateau, more like a big house, but codenames can be tricky sometimes I guess. The owner had lots of cars, on the last pictures I saw from other people there were more spectacular ones, but I guess they cleaned up the garden. A lot of mess in most rooms, but two of the rooms where actually quite worth photographing!
  24. Visited this place with my exploring partner..I had been warned it was not for the faint hearted.but we were not prepared for what we saw.as we entered the door there was a dog cage and inside was a skeleton of a dog.trapped inside.there was lots of cages inside and dog baskets.rubex found some documents upstairs showing it was a dog re homing place.the whole house was covered in dry dog poo.several inches thick.i found out later the story was that a married couple owned it.the husband died and his wife struggled to cope.and went down with Alzheimer's and was bed ridden in one room.there was lots of water bottles in one room.and she died there leaving the dogs to fend for themselves.god knows what them poor things suffered in there.resorting to chewing the furniture.the rspca had apparently visited earlier but failed to take the dogs away.the place was full of beautiful stuff.we walked away feeling sad instead of feeling happy that we had seen a massive house full of stuff.i have been in a lot of houses now.but nothing will compare to what I saw in here
  25. I spotted this place while on another recent excursion and was passing again yesterday so called in for a look while on the way to other things. Not a huge amount of anything left inside and the entire ground floor is shrouded in darkness due to it being totally boarded up so I only photographed the upstairs. I loved the doors in here, real nice original wooden doors which would look lovely done up. Thanks for looking
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