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Found 162 results

  1. Kingdom Monastery... an unknown building abandonned from a while. A great architecture and white room give its a special atmosphere. A magic place
  2. hi visited with Stussy on a mild day in March Its not been shut too long and being honest lacked the decay I love, however, it was fun and a bit surreal as it was so intact other parts to it but looked alarmed so happy with this................. for now Cheers The Baron
  3. I took a look around this place back in March and posted it on another UE site but since joining up on here I thought I'd share it on here as well After reading in the local rag (Leyland Guardian) that planning permission has been submitted and is very likely to be passed on building 750 homes and employment units, I decided to get a look at the old girl again before she disappears for good just like the rest of Leyland's industrial heritage. Not much history is written about this place but from what I can gather, it was built in the mid to late 70s as a replacement for the 1st Test Track that was situated off Hall Lane in Leyland. As Leyland was considered one of Britain's biggest industrial towns with the Motors site taking up most of the town, it is pretty sad to see that hardly any traces of it remain. We are bombarded with reminders of Leyland's illustrious past and rich industrial heritage yet it's being mothballed to an extent that hardly any of the workers from Leyland Motors barely recognise. Upto now, this unique site has survived the bulldozers but not so much the Pikeys. A lot of the drain covers have been stolen, leaving dangerous 7-10ft drops at the side of the track and the workshop has suffered considerable damage since I visited here in March. Anyways, on with the pictures... Just as you get through the access point, look to the left and you're greeted by this which I thought was quite amusing. Seeing as the Leyland Cross cobbles were covered over in the last two years, I'd say these are the last set of cobbles in Leyland. I wonder if this is the original sign... Where once there was industry I think this safety barrier might've been pikeyed a bit. Those sweeping corners and high cambers would make for a huge amount of fun around here. This is the bridge that was used to gain access from the roads to test the trucks and buses. A look out from the bridge. The Eyes That No Longer See. Finally, the Track begins to Give Way to nature. Thanks for looking...
  4. Visited with banned batz and andy. First time out for awhile included a trip here. This was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead, Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill.By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved.At its height it employed 180 people but the mill shut down in 1982. There are currently plans to try and convert it in to apartments.
  5. ive been rather intrigued by this littleone for a long time..ide wander past several times last summer and have a little peek but could never really figure the place out...was some one living in it or not?? A closer peep a few weeks ago had me spinning on my head ( well you know what i mean ) Time to grab my besty PS and pay her a little more closer attention...we decided on the time and the was no stopping us...snow up to the top of my wellies my road blocked and it was truley perishing out... but the was no keepin PS in... i heard the familiar PEEP PEEP " get up T**T its splore time.. grin from ear to ear " and a barage of bashes on my door..it was four am and im pearing out the door at knee high snow hmmmm:) "Lets go!"!! Whoop! so here she is..... The seamstress's Cottage.... Over to PS now.....
  6. Well here is my first report on the site so please be gentle !! Wasn't sure what to expect with this it was either going to be a fail or a quick mooch round a yard but how wrong I was ! Was there for several hours and the place is a lot bigger than it looks and relatively untouched, it made for an enjoyable morning and a lot of pictures to go through. Below is a History of the place and then the pics. There were also some resedential properties here but were all much of the same and not of any real interest.... The British pig industry owes a huge debt of gratitude to its centre of research and development done here. The UK pig industries Development Unit, in Bedfordshire was opened by Lord Belstead, Minister of State (Lords), Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Foods in November 1984. Over the years it has undergone many changes but has always been at the forefront of research firmly aimed at delivery of practical opportunities, work which could be quickly disseminated and implemented on working pig farms. At its peak the unit employed 10 staff and had 300 sows farrow to finish. However major changes in the industry and a fundamental shift in the strategy of the British Pig Executive (BPEX) meant it was no longer needed and over the last six months has been gradually wound down. The final piece of research work was completed in May 2007, part of the Defra LINK �3.5m weaner research programme. The centre's part was to look at weaner diets that maximised the use of home-grown cereals and oilseeds. To the end, the stock performed excellently with weaning to slaughter growth rates of 740g/day and grower to slaughter in excess of 1050g/day. A BPEX Director of Pig Industry Development said: "It has been a huge asset to the industry over the years and we are sad to see it go. "BPEX carried out a major review of its research and development and unfortunately itdidn't fit into the new perspective." Research over the years Over the years, the work has included: - Introduction of soya bean meal to pig diets - Copper sulphate as a growth promoter - Evaluation of commercial genotypes for sow productivity, growth - Performance and carcase and meat quality (Stotfold First Trial) - Development of ultrasound technology for carcase composition - Blueprint for pig meat eating quality - Stotfold sow lactation feeding strategy - Phase-feeding - protein requirements of commercial genotypes - Established speed of growth and pork tenderness were positively correlated - Liquid feeding offers savings of 14p/kg dead weight - Liquid feeding halves the percentage of pigs testing positive for Salmonella at slaughter BPEX has been exploring the redevelopment of the site and planning permission is being applied for.
  7. Easter Weekend - myself, Silverainbow, HitGirl, Rich, Harry, Greg and Kevin. The freezing temperatures, bitter wind and snow would not ruin a great day exploring Dover. These various sites have been done inside out by so many people, so I won't bore you with the history of them all, but their histories can all be easily found online. We began the day early with Z Rocket at St Margaret's, complete with it's own Labrador guard dog. It was extremely dry down here, but a good start to the day. Moving on to North Entrance, the roof vent had been cleared of crap, creating a lovely bright light down into the tunnel. HitGirl had to be talked through the spiders in the tunnels between the water tanks here, but she braved it well. It was then time to head to Hospital Postern, a staircase, where a few artistic shots were taken with tea lights and wire wool. The climb back from here was slippery, and the polystyrene-like snow didn't help! A quick break for lunch, where Harry got well acquainted with a local pensioner, before heading to South Casemates. A nice explore, despite the graffiti, with lovely lighting. It was then time for... the pipe. A long, very small chalk cave system including an 8ft long, 40cm diameter porcelain pipe, which involved knee bashing, mound climbing, dust inhaling, body squashing, cramped crawling and a lot of laughs. North Casemates had suffered a lot less vandalism and damage, so the rooms were well worth the crawl. On the way back, I got one arm stuck down by my side, with no room to move it in front of me, meaning I had to crawl through with only one arm ahead of me, shortly followed by HitGirl almost losing her trousers. Leaving Casemates, a quick group shot was taken, before finally heading to the Grand Shaft and then to the train station for the ride home. Thanks to those that made it a great day, such a good bunch of people! Only a few assorted photos of the places we visited, as I only have a point and shoot. Nonetheless, one or two okay shots. Enjoy! 1. Z Rocket 2. Lovely gates at Hospital Postern (excuse the flash) 3. Striking graffiti and rubbel at South Casemates 4. View out from South Casemates 5. North Casemates 6. Icicles at North Casemates 7. Huge concrete block backfill at North Casemates 8. View behind of HitGirl and Kevin emerging from the pipe into the chalk cave tunnels 9. View in front of the cramped tunnels (apologise again for the flash, no time to light paint) 10. Looking up at Grand Shaft 11.Lovely Dover sunset 12. Group shot
  8. Explored with Therealindianajones and one non member
  9. Explored with Therealindianajones and one non member, Called snake River Mills because it was by a river and we found a snake lol
  10. After a mess up with directions on a saturday explore decided to go for a walk with Miss CSI on sunday and see this lovely old church, been before and love it every time I see it. Heres some history:- St.Andrew's church is a partly redundant anglican church in covehithe suffolk, it's grade I listed. Part of the church is in ruins and is under the churches conservation trust. It stands on a lane leading to the sea, which has suffered significant ongoing coastal erosion. The eldest fabric in the original large medieval church dates from the 14th century but most of it from the 15th century. During the civil war of charles 1st much of the stained glass was destroyed. By the later part of that century the large church was too expensive for the parishioners to maintain, they were given permission in 1672 to remove the roof and to build a smaller church within it. The pews were 15th Century and the pulpit is 17th century. Enjoy the pics:-
  11. visited with six riff raff and pezzar ... we arrived early Friday morning ,all keen to start working are way throught the list and cram as much into three days as possible Friday didn't quite go to plan after a few fails a trye change and run in with Belgiums finest who took are details and ask us politely to leave we then heading onto traction sud could of spent all night at this place there so much to see so defintley a revisit in order on with the pics apologies for the overkill with the fish-eye got a little carried away ... traction sud ... lightspeed ... chateau luminere... theatre jusete ... Villa Wallfhart ... thanks for looking ...
  12. Now then. Recently Maniac, Frosty and I went out for a spot of Dover derping and this is "wot we done" South trollands #1: Troll mills west: Thanks to the guys for an entertaining evening out, and thanks to you for looking in, R. Jewson
  13. I've had my eye on this for a while, looks like once they got going, they hit it hard cos now, well, its ruined. I'm going to start a campaign, Urbexorzzzz againzzzzt developerzzzzzz! HANDS OF OUR DERPS! A clip from the local news a few years ago gives the info. 'Most of the outpatient services will be moving to nearby Acre Mill along with antenatal services and back room offices. The concern is the hospital will run short of beds as the ageing population rises and hospital bosses say the move would mean they could run a more “efficient and effective� service. The plans were revealed at a Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust board meeting yesterday. The Z block at Acre Mills opposite the hospital will be redesigned to integrate primary and secondary care, community and social care into more of a one-stop service. Director of service development at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust Lesley Hill said: “This plan will require quite a significant re-design but we want patient experience to improve and staff satisfaction to improve. Read more: Examiner http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/local-we ... 2NEyWW8aX' Again, no carpets, but this times we had lights, randomly placed outside lift shafts.... Anyway, visited with drinkinbud andbeardythewierdy, I wouldn't really recommend anyone else bothers LOL. Some bugger around here loves the 2 tone paint job, it's in all the mills! It had a corridor. A room. Some more rooms. One had a wheelbarrow. And a corridor on the way out. First in I think, not bloody worth it. LOL!
  14. It's grim up North! Myself, Drinkinbud and the Beardyemukidwhotagsalong went for a mooch around this mill, we've all passed, either discounted it, it was tight or more recently full of pikeys with diggers?!?!?!!? Comedy of the day involved drinkinbud complaining that he liked southern places better, electricity, carpet, warm........he is now our honorary southern softie LOL! Anyway, here's some stolen history: "The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves." Beardygirlpants doing his thing. Drinkinbud attempting to stare at his strongbow till it magically fills up again.. Graffreflection, just had to. At the top. My big shaft shot. It's full of big rooms. And doors. And lift shafts. HI! Also has an outside. Actually, for somewhere with very little detail, this place was great, well worth a wonder round if you can! Cheers for looking.
  15. Explored with Shush and 5 others Great day with great people
  16. Explored with one other non member Fab little place with the most beautiful stairs i have ever seen
  17. explored with wevsky and urban ginger ... a big to humpa and his cousin As wevsky explained things didn't quite go to plan on this trip, but saying that cars can be replaced good friends cant ! so all good in the end . After a flying visit to Amsterdam on the way through we push on to Berlin . We arrived at beelitz early morning and as we had been told of different things to look out for we expected someone to be on site. After coming out the third building and bumping into a group of seven German explores. We exchanged a few locations and they told us that secca wasn't a problem i didn't really get anoth pics to show the place in all its glory but no doubt it wont be long before were heading back that way really need a couple of days to cover it properly ... on with the pics .... thanks for looking ...
  18. Visited with Urban Ginger,SpaceInvader and met up with Humpa and his cousin..and a few random German bods while there This trip was supposed to be a day or so longer and we had a full on list to get thru. That all went tits up after a car crash bad enough to write off two cars.The insurance company mugged us off and although saying they would get the car moved it was down to the breakdown cover people to get us home.. The breakdown cover said it was the other way round and when we tried to get back to insurance company the automated message informed UG that business was closed till Monday morning ,so we where stranded..Thankfully Humpa and co. came back and got us to the hotel which we had booked for that night and after getting quoted 800 for train tickets for us to get to Calais or a hire car for 600 euros we where getting rather stressed as we didn't have a huge amount of money..UG' family to the rescue and easy jet tickets where paid for in the uk and we had our way home and could get some sleep before we had to leave.Big thanks to silver rainbow for the lift back from the airport.. So all in all bloody stressful few days after a ten hour drive to Germany..The upside was a visit to Amsterdam to check out the tulips and the women in the little rooms with big windows where very friendly:) History from wicki On with some pics Couple of shots from the hotel roof to finish..and thank you for bearing with me i know its a bit pic heavy Sad to say this is the only report but thew trip did end with a Bang!
  19. This was another one of those explores for me that had fond memories attached to it, This place was most recently used as a Motor Museum which was closed back in 2006, In my child hood my Gran used to take me here from time to time the place still smels exactly as it did back then, funny how old oil lingers for ever !, History more than covered by Wevsky In his Report viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1959 Visited with Space Invader, Morgan, Obscurity & Vickie, So on with the Pics ! Good Explore this, Shame its all buttoned up tight again !
  20. I first visited this place in almost a year ago to the day, but our splore was cut short by the free roaming sec dog So we decided to go for a return to see if Fido was still there, well he was, and this time he had a friend Crank the sound up and have a little lookie at Trogs video.......... A little history Opened in 1933 by William Chandler. It had a larger attendance and income from gambling than any other dog racing track in the UK, and was at one time the largest track in the UK with capacity for over 5,000 spectators It's popularity waned and in 2008 it closed There has been a large campaign to bring it back to life including a 20,000 signature petition Developers London & Quadrant (L&Q) took ownership of the iconic site, but have infuriated campaigners by failing to submit planning applications or accept offers to buy or lease the site. Infact a £9m bid by businessman and greyhound enthusiast Bob Morton was rejected by the owners My piccies..........
  21. After a last minute phone call from troglodyte , and it was off to london for a late night meet . visited with wevsky ,troglodyte and urban ginger a little history... All eight Deep Level shelters built during 1941-1942 under existing London Underground stations remained under the ownership of the British Government for many years after the cessation of hostilities. The initial plan of incorporating them into an express rail route through the centre of London was initially shelved and then abandoned due to the lack of money after the War. Then, in the late 1990s, London Underground was given the opportunity to take control of the shelters with a view to leasing them out. Since then, the deep level shelters have been progressively leased to companies interested in using them to store items such as documents, film, videotapes and other similar archive material. All except Clapham North, which has remained completely empty since its contents were cleared after the War. Transport for London advertised the lease for Clapham North deep level shelter using a local estate agent and the requests came in. Many interesting and unusual requests for use were suggested but had to be rejected for health and safety reasons - the most common being people wanting to construct a night club in the 1,400ft tunnels! Some suggested creating living accommodation there - though precisely who would like to live in an unlit tunnel over 100ft beneath London is unclear to me. It was even rumoured that a large entertainment company had seriously looked into the possibility of converting one of these locations into a theme park ride based on World War 2 air raids! Realistically though, the only practical use for this prime central London real estate space would be for storage. on with the pics on with the pics... thanks for looking
  22. This was day 2 of our Wiltshire trip and was really nice to explore,must admit i personally didnt wander as far as frosty and tb's did as the farmhouse cider had well and truely kicked in so myself maniac and obscurity had a shorter wander on our own.Raptor jesusturned up in the middle of the night which was a nice touch to the evening More info can be found here..http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown's_Folly Could have covered more ground but id had cider and feet where killing me and all the tea lights looked pretty !
  23. Where to start! Obviously I won't bore you with history as it is all over this forum. We arrived here a bit late from London after having a nightmare on the trains, so we knew we had a bit of a flying visit due to the lack of daylight - although the clocks going forward helped us out! Managed to see a lot, including the tower and the padded cell. On the way out it got dark very fast, and the walkways and buildings can be very disorienting, especially when there are sagging/nonexistent floors all over the place. We were trying to get into the building we got in through, but we were in the one next to it, so coming back into the covered walkway a security guard who spoke very broken English and carried a large plank of wood caught us. We were walked to the nearest exit and waited with him and his partner until the police arrived. Won't go into that, but we got a lift to Epsom station! So not too bad. This is not a good place to be in the dark, mainly because you need to see where you are going, but also because security tend to be a lot more suspicious, and your torchlight gives you away! Pictures 1. 2. Grass on the first floor. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 9.5. 10. 10.5. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Oliver GT. 18. 19. 20. 21.
  24. The Marconi Radio Factory Visited with Skeleton Key, Priority 7 and Tstranger1066. This was the 2nd stop on our day trip to Chelmsford. The place looks absolutely fantastic, full of bits and bobs, but unfortunately after only 20 minutes we got nabbed by 4 really amicable members of Essex Plod and asked to leave the premises, so it's on the cards for a revisit The History Marconi's New Street factory was built in 1912 next to the Great Eastern Railway. A railway siding ran across New Street into the factory yard and brought materials in one end of the works and took finished radio equipment out of the other. At the South end of the building two huge aerial masts once stood, the 450ft (137m) high "Marconi Poles" formed Chelmsfords most prominent landmark. During the Second World War the Marconi Company employed more than 6,000 people in Chelmsford. Producing vital military communications equipment, the New St factory became a target for bombing and was hit in May 1941 with a loss of 17 lives. In 1920, two years before the BBC was established, the New Street factory made history as the site of the first official British sound broadcasts including the famous concert by Dame Nellie Melba which was heard all over the world. The workers entrance I learned everything I know about attenuation of radio signals and the impact and mitigation of ionospheric anomalies from this book, not to mention two-dimensional ionospheric tomography over low-latitude regions The Gang Thanks for looking
  25. St.Johns's Hospital Chelmsford Visited with Skeleton Key, Tstranger1066 and Priority 7 The doors of St John's Hospital – where half of Chelmsford's population was born – swing shut for the final time on November 18th, 2010, marking the end of a vast chapter in the town's history. Nurses who have worked at the centre for decades fought back tears as they packed their equipment and mementos into a sea of blue plastic boxes. Pictures signifying a thousand happy memories were stripped from its peeling yellow walls, rows of empty beds pushed through bare corridors and a fleet of trucks delivered everything to the new £148 million wing at Broomfield Hospital. But there are fears the site, now prime for housing, could become a wasteland. Thanks for looking
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