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  1. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  2. One of my favorite sites, I just love this building with its stunning wood structure, shame the vandals keep try to torch it!
  3. Another one of our February Nothern Road Trip with Mookster, our American friend and myself. A bit of a strange one this. An old mill, but vastly converted for commercial use and modernised. Massively decayed in places. There isn't much early history on the mill building itself; but it has been extended over the years to accommodate the increasingly expanding business Dronsfield Mercedes until its closure in around 2009. The building has workshop areas, storage areas, offices and also a living quarters. Dronsfields Mercedes are the largest independent Mercedes car & commercial vehicle specialist in Europe. A Saddleworth based company based at Wall Hill Mill. This family run business has over 30 years experience in the industry. The Dobcross site covers 8 acres, which means the company were able to fully fulfil customers requirements directly from under one roof while on the site. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694322755981
  4. Visited back in Early Feb with Mookster and an American Explorer friend, who is over on an educational placement. We had quite a Northern Road Trip planned; with around 18 sites on our list, but sadly did about 4 or 5 over two days. Annoying but that's the nature of this beast! Cellars Clough Mill was originally owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. Sam also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by company Fisher, Firth & Co. which named the mill "Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd", managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has since been dissolved and the mill is believed to have closed in the 80s. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful because it was discovered that bats were found to be residing insude mill. The bats cannot be forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually move on. Wings of the mill have been demolished; presumably to let nature in and destroy the mill? #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157692916601562
  5. Rylands Mill - Pagefield College campus - Video Report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Hope this video report meets the standards for the sight, any feedback greatly appreciated as I just want to share my experiences with you guys not start selling caps and tee shirts and begging you to subscribe thanks.
  6. Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.
  7. Hope the photo file sizes are good as I had to reduce them due to the cap. Brockmill first began operations around the mid-1700s and further expanded when the Earl of Balcarres bought the mill and built a furnace at Haigh foundry half a mile downstream. The two sights prospered building large steam cylinders and fire engines also building the first locomotive for Lancashire, and plenty more to follow. Later the mill expanded into brick and textile making, however, the works closed in 1885 more recently the mill was used for the production of herbal medicine Unfortunately, i found no date as to when production stopped I'm sure you'll agree though guy's it's a wonderful explore in a serene location.
  8. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
  9. The beautiful post-apocalyptic page field mill - Video Report
  10. Brock Mill video and photographic reports - 5/2/2018 A quality explore that we really enjoyed. Not the most architecturally stunning but still there's a certain beauty about decay.
  11. I am a filmmaker and YouTuber, and i'm trying to get into Urbex. I really enjoy finding out about the history of the sites that i want to visit and exploring them with my son. Last week we visited a site in West Yorkshire. The site is an old fur fabrics mill and has been covered before on this forum. This is a first attempt at Urbex, so go easy on me! Exploring local abandoned mill in a cinematic style. Dudfleet Mills (Abandoned) - URBEX - Urban Exploration - DJI Spark Footage - Cinematic Edit
  12. History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  13. Hi and happy new year! Here’s a short video of a recent explore of Healey Mills marshalling Yard and Dudfleet mill - thanks for watching!
  14. History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  15. History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  16. Visited with @albino jay and @GK-WAX and thanks again to jay for doing the driving and I also stole your history mate because I couldn’t find any hope you don’t mind. We was passing by the mill on our way home so popped in for a look. And glad we did I like these old mills. And the demo team were already on site so don’t know how long it has left to stand. So here’s the history and pics.. Steam-powered worsted-spinning mill built around 1850 on Black Brook. Owners and tenants of the mills have included James Nutton & Company [1863] John Horsfall & Sons Limited [1896] F. K. Adcock & Company [1936] Part of the Mills are still standing though no longer used. The mill had a 170 ft tall chimney which was struck by lightning in 1967. The chimney was reduced in height – to avoid further strikes – and was finally demolished in March/April 1992 The majority of the Mills were demolished in 2017. The mill by Lavino lavino[/ The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/H2Q9pV]The mill by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  17. This was an old Mine and Mill in Scotland I visited that has been around since the 1820s it was rebuilt after WWII when German Bombers dropped inceduries onto it. The lift and mine shaft to the mine is still pretty much intact so I think it may be possible to maybe descend with a rope into the mine it's self. There was a CCTV camera on one of the windows of the buildings but I'm sure this was a fake one and just there as a deterent to looters. It is the first explore I have done where vandals and looters havent yet ransacked the area so I decided to keep the name of the area private but if anyone wants to visit then shoot me a pm.
  18. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  19. Abandoned Paper Mill, UK Visited with: Alex Visit Date: April 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. My Visit I had been wanting to visit the mill for some time, however, I kept pushing this one aside for a rainy day. Eventually myself & Alex decided it was time.... This would be my first visit and Alex's second. So, early on a soggy, wet, rainy and very windy April morning we set off to what would turn out to be one of the best & most enjoyable explores I have been on. The entry to the mill I knew was going to be tricky because Alex had told me the way in when planning the visit. Lots of climbing was needed and the main thing I was thinking was do not rush and avoid any areas that look a little sketchy. It worked and we both made it in without any issues. Now, I knew the mill was a large site after seeing many other photos from people who had been here and within a few minutes of dropping in the scale of this place became a reality! I am no expert in the process of making paper so I will only state what I have read as to what the machinery was used for. I think the yellow machines in this photo fed the pipes in the following photos. I spent a good amount of time in this room due to all the pipework shooting off in different directions. I love lines and angles and this area had plenty to go at. From what I have read the pipes were for feeding pulp into machines on a lower floor. It makes sense as you can see the pipes attached to the ceiling feeding the pipes on the other side of the room that dissapear into the floor. The mill has plenty of large rooms that could have been used for many things such as storage & packaging. Here are a few photos of these spaces. It is always good to get a feel for the people who worked in these places and when you find the brew / changing rooms it kind of brings you back to reality. People once worked here, this was their income for paying the bills, but sadly no more. The different characters that would have been in these rooms over the years and the stories they have told. Does anyone think that this was the male changing room! And no, not because it is messy.... Situated in the middle of the main working areas we found the brew room which consisted of two floors for people to sit and relax whilst on their breaks. A shower room and another changing room are situated off to the side but I never took a photo, why I hear you ask... because my brain gave out on me and I forgot. I remember thinking that it must have been very noisy in here due to the fact that it is surrounded on all sides by large machinery. All I know about these machines is that they were used for rolling the paper. The room is crammed from wall to wall with machinery with only a central isle to walk down. Do you remember earlier in the report that I said the pulp was fed through the pipes and down to machines on a lower floor? Well these are the machines that was fed the pulp. What happened to the pulp at this stage I have absolutely no idea. The room was very dark (and hard to photograph) and I remember when entering feeling like I had been taken back in time to the industrial revolution. Lots of metal on show, dirt, pipes & strange looking machines it was very surreal. I can imagine this area being very hot and noisy with lots of sweaty dirty workers going about their tasks. As well as all the machines there was also a good amount of office space here. Most was very badly decayed or trashed but I did find this room rather interesting. Ok so back to the working areas... This is the largest area we came across on the visit, lots of different areas within one floor all working together in what you could call a production line. Again I got a surreal feeling here due to the fact that at one time this place would have been bustling with people and noise. Now though, nothing, nothing other than the sounds of our footsteps and the rain hitting the roof. Tucked away in the corner of this area we found three forklifts parked up. They look in very good working order and I am sure if you had the keys they would start up. The final photo is of an area where one of the end results is stacked up on pallets and either moved to storage or loaded onto wagons. There is still some paper stacked on pallets that will have come down the conveyors as you can see in the photo. Behind me is two very large shutter doors that open to a loading area. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Lotus Hall aka Cuckoo Hall on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Final thoughts To me having a fantastic location to see is only 50% of what makes a good trip the other is great company and this day had both, I loved every minute we spent here. There was so much to see and with every room being different it allowed your mind to try and figure out and imagine what the area was used for and the communal areas made you think of the people who worked here..... To me that is what exploring is all about! With the size of this place I am sure myself & Alex will have missed some areas and I would love to revisit here at some point. The mill instantly became one of my favorite locations that I have been lucky enough to see and rightly so. Finally, thanks to my good Friend Alex for the company as always. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  20. No history unfortunately, and it will soon be luxury apartments Narrowly avoiding death with Raz, Jamie_P & Rott3nWood. The Explore; So we went for a look at the Conditioning House but other than teleportation i couldnt see a way in. So not worth traversing a wall with concreted glass on the top and a gate covered in Razor Wire... Still always come out with a positive right so going with that frame of mind, if i'd have slipped i'd have received ghetto acupuncture free of charge - Sweet So over the road we went and after crossing the needle forrest (Not nice pine needles if you catch my drift) we had a look around this place. Nothing spectacular and not really worth the risk of aids or being mauled by the dogs loose in the building or even the dodgey as fook floors but i still managed to chuck together a decent amount of photos; Thanks for looking
  21. Morning all, Explored with Raz So this was a while ago, but as im nearing the end of my back log of reports i thought id post it up for you Bit of background Founded by Joseph Rank in 1875, with the Hull site (Clarence Mill) opening in 1885. It was the first mechanically driven flour mill using steel rollers instead of grinding stones and this produced 6 sacks of flour per hour instead of 1 and a half which was the accepted good rate of production. Such revolutionary technology paved the way for modern flour mills today. During the second world war Hull was prone to heavy bombing runs by the Luftwaffe and the mill was "redesigned" by hitlers flying army and so what you see today (If it is infact still there as the demolition was in full swing last i checked) is a rebuild around the original silos. The factory closed in 2005 and yet still in April this year, 10 years after closure the flour on the floor could give the impression that it was closed only yetserday. The Explore First stop of the day on our trip to Costa Del Hull (T'Yorkshire one, not the one darn sarth) and first of all i was amazed at how easy access was. Raz was telling me about rats the size of dogs and i was bitterly dissapointed i didnt get to see any of these beasts but it was easy to see why, everywhere you looked the floor was covered in bright blue corn... corn isnt normally blue as far as im aware but im northern so what do i know? So i can only assume this was some crazy poison that made even the corpses disolve as we found none. Anyway, good mooch about over some incredibly dodgey floors with some sickening drops below. The roof is a good old place to chill with views out over the city itself and also out over the Humber Estuary and the Deep. Thanks for looking, dont forget to check out my facebook page where i post most my pictures; www.facebook.com/seldomseenworldue
  22. The history of Robert Fletcher & sons paper mill dates back to the industrial revolution. The company was once owned by Ralph Crompton and Nephews, producers and bleachers of paper. Their first mill was located in Stoneclough, Manchester. The death of the Crompton brothers left the mill ownerless and the succession was offered to Robert Fletcher, the mill’s manager at the time. Fletcher had risen through the ranks, to first become the manager of the bleaching department and later the whole mill. Following Fletcher’s death on 17th May 1865, his sons John and James took over. They in turn passed down the mill to their sons, also named John and James. In 1897 the mill was incorporated as a limited company. In 1921 a second mill opened, located at Greenfield, near Oldham. The mill specialised in the production of cigarette paper and at its height employed 1000 people to run seven paper machines. These machines produced only a fraction of the paper the later, much larger machines could produce. Upon closure the mill had three machines – two very similar lines from 19XX and a huge modern 1996 addition. By 1986 the company was making a loss and was purchased by the Melton Medes Conglomerate who turned the company around and started to make a profit once again. However by 2001 the company was once again failing and the decision was made to close the Stoneclough Mill. Some people were transferred to the Greenfield mill, but the company could not sustain the increasing loses and was forced into receivership. The mill was closed down overnight. The mill at Stoneclough has been demolished. To this day the mill at Greenfield still remains how it was the day it closed. Streams of paper remain inside the machines, connected to the rolls of finished product at the end of the production lines – a time capsule from a bygone era. Wood Pulp Treatment and Preparation Paper starts off as wood bails which is turned into a pulp using machines, then bleached. The rolling machines The rolling machines form the pulp into sheets. Spooling Machines and Packing Area The sheets are fed onto reels and cut to size Offices and Staff Areas Newer Machine Room This huge machine was a later addition an is much more modern than the rest of the machinery.
  23. Explored with Raz & Rott3nW00d History By 1920 extensive railway sidings had been developed on the railway line eastsoutheast of Healey, named Healey Mill Sidings. In the 1960s, as part of a modernisation plan, the sidings were re-designed for more efficient wagon load handling. Construction included cutting a new channel over 1,000 yards long for the River Calder south of the original, levelling of the site with over 1 million cubic yards of infill, the re-construction and extension of a road bridge at the east end of the site near Horbury Bridge, the construction of three railway bridges over the River Calder, and diversion of gas and electricity mains. The new yard was built as a hump shunting (gravity) yard capable of handling 4,000 wagons a day. The reception sidings were built west of the River Calder, the main yard was built on the extended site of the former sidings. The main control tower was located south of the main line and the Calder Vale Dye Works near to the river.The yard opened in 1963 at a cost of £3.5 million. The diesel motive power depot at Healey Mills (Healey Mills Diesel Depot or Healey Mills TMD) opened in 1967. After the marshalling yard closed in 1987, the site was used for storage of trains and locomotives. After the privatisation of British Rail the site was operated by EWS; an assessment was made of a future requirement of six long doubled ended sidings and further short single ended sidings. After 2010 the site's use was limited to crew changes; the driver depot at Healey Mills closed in 2012, being relocated to portacabins at Wakefield Kirkgate station after 4 February 2012. Explore & Cildhood Memories; This is certainly not a new one for me, having spent a lot of my childhood in Ossett i was down at this rail yard clambering about as much as i could. I was really quite shocked when i arrived yesterday to find that the place had been emptied!! When i used to go down there were hundreds of carriages and loads of diesel loco's. I remember many a sunny afternoon pretending to drive this bad boys around... I also remember a lot of nettles. Anyway, whilst in the area we decided to nip down for a mooch about and although it wasnt as good as it used to be, i had a good time reliving my childhood If you got this far, thanks for looking
  24. Still miles behind in posting some reports up, but this was from an small trip to Engerlandshire and Welsheepshugger land between Xmas and New Year. First stop of this particular cold morning was one of two mills I visited. The first is known as Tweed Mill, and access is not the easiest, but a bit of decent balance and no stopping half way over its simple enough for what is a bit of a gem of a little mill. Ever since I first saw this place appear on the forums a few years ago, I knew it was right up my street, lots of nice natural decay, and plenty of bits left behind to see!! The second mill, only a mile up the road, was jam packed with machines, making it a bit harder to get the images I wanted, but did my best, known as the Wool Mill. Many thanks for looking, as always, click the pics if you want to see more or visit my Flickr
  25. Explored with Raz History; Dalton Mills was once the largest textile mill in the region, employing over 2000 workers. It was built by Joseph Craven in 1869, replacing the original mill which was owned by Rachel Leach in the 1780's. The mill was named Dalton Mills after the manager employed by Rachel Leach, a man called Dalton. In its heyday between 1869 and 1877 the mill provided jobs for workers all over Keighley and the Worth Valley. As the textile industry declined, the fortunes of Dalton Mills changed and up until 2004, it had been virtually empty for almost a decade. John Craven, the great-great grandson of Joseph, who had built the mill, eventually chose to sell Dalton Mills, to ensure it’s survival. Part of the renovation of the Clock Tower has included restarting the landmark clock which has not ticked for 25 years. In the mill's heyday, thousands of workers relied on the clock to get to work on time, but the hands had not moved for a quarter of a century.The clock was repaired, so it can display the time to the whole of Dalton Lane again. The explore; After a couple of failed attempts we returned with new resolve! Mishing through pikey yards and trying every window we could find we finally found our way in! Past asbestos warnings and fire damage into the most asthetically pleasing mill i've ever seen. Workshops, large open spaces and the signs of redevelopment. Plus an extremely dodgey floor! - what else can you want? Few snaps from the day; Dirty bit of HDR to finish If you got this far, thanks for looking
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