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  1. Methodist hall Methodist central halls were grand buildings that used to attract thousands of people when the temperance movement was at its strongest. The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Participants in the movement typically criticize alcohol intoxication or promote complete abstinence (teetotalism), leaders emphasizing the sinfulness of drinking as well as the evil effects on personality, family life. Ironically over the years many have been sold off, with some now used as bars and nightclubs. The Methodist Central Hall, Located in Corporation Street, Birmingham, England, is a three storey red brick and terracotta Grade II* listed building with a distinctive tower at the northern end of Corporation Street, opposite the Victoria Law Courts. It is located within the Steelhouse Conservation Area. The terracotta was manufactured by the renowned firm of Gibbs and Canning Limited of Tamworth, which also produced decorative works for 179-203 Corporation Street and the interior of the Victoria Law Courts in Birmingham along with the Natural History Museum in London. The street level has twelve bays of shops (four with their original fronts). The building also runs along Ryder Street and has more original shop fronts. It was built 1903-4 by architects Ewan Harper & James A. Harper at a cost of £96,165. Its main hall seats 2,000 and it has over thirty other rooms including three school halls. In 1991, the Methodist Church was converted into a nightclub; however, this venture closed in 2002. The hall was re-opened on 14 September 2007 as the 'Que club.' The opening night was hosted by 'Drop Beats Not Bombs'. On re-opening the club has seen extensive repairs and improvements to its decor, and regularly hosted events such as Atomic Jam and Fantasia. The site has remained empty since 2016 and has fallen into a state of disrepair in recent years and has had vegetation growing out of the upper floors, prompting Historic England to add it to its 'Heritage at Risk’ register. The building has been the subject of proposals to be converted into an office building. The first of such was submitted in 2001, only to be withdrawn. Planning applications to convert the building into apartments have also been rejected by Birmingham City Council on the basis that original internal features would be destroyed. However, the council has since given planning consent to a proposal to convert the building into apartments. It is to be referred to the Local Government Office. In 2017 it was reported that the Methodists Central hall is set to be transformed into a new £35 million hotel and leisure quarter with a rooftop bar and restaurant. London-based property investor Ciel Capital has unveiled plans to transform the Grade II*-listed Methodist Central Hall into a leisure complex with a hotel, apart-hotel and a mix of retail and food units. DSC_3288 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3289 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3290 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3269 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3267 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3270 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3272 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3277 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3278 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3279 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3280 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3281 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3284 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3287 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3258 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3261 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3282 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  2. Another backlog from a West Country Road Trip back in late May with Mookster, our American explorer friend and myself. This was our second stop off on our first day on the trip; our first being Tone Mills, a revisit for me so I haven't done a report, but with Tone its always a pleasure seeing it. A wonderful site each and every time. The three of us embarked on the large two day road trip in my trusty 1988 Volvo 240 and rocked up in Torrington that morning. This site has been derelict for absolutely years, but its in the arse end of nowhere so its taken a while to see it. - Closed in 1993; Dairy Crest's Creamery sat on a site which had been a creamery since 1874. This particular Art Deco site was built in the 1930's to meet needs, but When the government de-centralised milk collection,the creamery was finally killed off and it closed its doors; a severe blow to the area; with around 200 Job losses. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157699243815344
  3. Popped out with the new camera yesterday with two friends. Still getting used to it. :D Went to Hi-Finish Castings in Birmingham. From what I could find out with paperwork inside the land was bought in 1935 at a cost of £12,000. In between 1935 and 1941 the building was built and an inventory took place in July 1941 at a cost of £25,269. Various metals were made for all types of products like wall fittings (Sockets and light fixtures) to car parts(Door handles, wing mirror casing and much more) and they had various clients like Bentley, Ford and Talbot. In the early days also Mitchells and Butler where involved in the company. Was a great relaxed explore and even though the main factory space was empty (It had some gems) the offices were great. The safe in the toilet had some wonderful paperwork in it detailing the history. What a depressing canteen though. Windows on all sides with a view of a brick wall. Some wonderful gems about if you look though. Closed in 2008 I believe with a loss of about 42 jobs. Company is no longer about. Enjoy.
  4. This place is not too far from where I live. i have heard all about it's history and decided to have a look inside and get some photos of the building itself. The place is an absolute death trap, ceiling's fallen through, water ingress all over etc. It started early life in 1900 as a roman catholic orphanage until 1940 when it became an approved borstal until 1984. During this period there has been reports of physical and sexual abuse which happened at St. Peter's over the years. in 1984 the school closed down and was sold for £130,000. The buyers bought the buildings and converted the main building into a nursing home for the elderly. Again this was in operation until closure in march 1999. The main building was demolished in 2016 due to a massive 9 hour fire and is only the gymnasium and the reception building that remain on the premises. As you can see in the photos the building is severely damaged due to dampness and vandalism.
  5. Recently we visited the Jean Monnet building of the European Commission in Luxembourg city, which is about to be demolished. The building was closed because they discovered asbestos in the air in block C. Unfortunately, we came too late and the most interesting part (Conference Centre) was already destroyed, but we managed to see the offices (mostly empty) and the sport centre with swimming pool in the basement. If you decide to go there, don't go to the building C, especially the lower floors!!! They have started demolishing them, we came in to one of the floors, and saw a creepy room completely covered with white film, from floor to ceiling, including doors and windows. Apparently, to protect the workers from asbestos. Just don't go there) Otherwise, buildings A and B are still fine. The keys on one of the pictures are from the data centre. It's now empty, they only left the keys) Here are also a couple of maps in case if someone wants to visit the place. The most interesting thing is that the building is guarded. Security are there 24/7. They are outside near building A, so be careful with the lights! At the level 2, at the border between buildings A and B, I left a short note on the side of one of escalators. You can try to find it) See the last picture, and the place is marked with big yellow circle on one of the maps.
  6. All, Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too. I wont bore you any longer, but heres some history of the station stolen from Google Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris. The station was closed on 2 September 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation with a lot of traffic passing through, but was eventually closed again as a result of its proximity to the neighboring station of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis, which lies only 100 metres away. In the past, the station served to shelter homeless persons, and the eastern section of the location is currently used as a day shelter for the homeless (managed by the Salvation Army). The station closed on 2nd September 1939. Heres afew of my shots i took Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for looking. DJ
  7. HISTORY Tenterden Town railway station is a heritage railway station on the Kent and East Sussex Railway in Tenterden, Kent, England. When the railway line first opened in 1900, Rolvenden Station was known as "Tenterden". Its name was changed when the line extended north three years later and a station closer to Tenterden was constructed. The new Tenterden Town station opened on 16 March 1903.The line closed for regular passenger services on 4 January 1954 and all traffic in 1961. It reopened on 3 February 1974 under the aegis of the Tenterden Railway Company which bought the line between Tenterden and Bodiam. The station now houses the KESR's Carriage and Wagon works, and the Colonel Stephens Museum is located nearby. EXPLORE So we set out on our explore with a list of places We wanted to check out. After a few not amounting to much and the next couple being total fails, we parked up and regrouped! The Tenterden site had been on my radar for a while (although I couldn’t be 100% about it’s location) so after a little discussion we decided to take a chance and head out to try and find the Lost Railway and its Train Graveyard. We headed toward the closest point by road, parked up and set off along a short path way. The area was really quiet apart from the odd dog walker. After literally five minutes we knew we were in the right place and could see the abandoned trains hidden amongst the trees. Access was easy literally a small hop over the fence and down the bank, there they were! Its the first time any of us had ever done an explore of this nature and it was amazing... Anyway here are some of the pictures we took throughout the explore. Thanks for reading 😊
  8. Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  9. Another season; another backlog, this shiftwork sure makes you a bit slower! I visited this site back at the end of March with Mookster and a non forum member. I have posted several reports after this one, but for some reason this one slipped the net. It was operated by Pilkington Glass up until the 1960's where sand was washed prior to the production of glass. The site is in St Helens, Merseyside and is an absolute mission to get into through mud, undergrowth and then in through a rust water filled basement. Its a wonder non f us fell into the water. I Accidentally shot these in JPEG so the editing is a bit ropey. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157698933151464
  10. A few photos from an exploring roadtrip of Essex and Kent with Mookster and our American explorer friend from back in April. Another backlog, and another one where I managed to set my camera to JPEG. DOHHH!!!! We clambered through some undergrowth and spent about 45 minutes inside. We were in one of the large corridors and heard barking. We absolutely pegged it down the corridor; I'm carrying quite a lot of extra weight so there was no chance to sneak into a side room for 10 mins. We heard the inevitable "OI!" from about 300 yards down the corridor, we'd been seen. I don't believe in running when actually caught; so we turned back and walked up to the security and explained ourselves. He asked us how we got in, marched us to the gate and let us go onto the road right by my car. result! I think our American friend was pleasantly suprised by how easy it went down. - St George's Hospital is a disused hospital situated on Suttons Lane in Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering, in North East London. It opened its doors in 1939 as "Suttons Institution" and was used during World War II to house airmen from the nearby RAF Hornchurch. In 1948 during its advent into the NHS; it was renamed St George's. The site has remained empty since 2012 and the vacant site has since been transferred into the ownership of NHS Property Services when the company was formed in April 2013. There are plans are in place for a new health centre on site, with the remaining land being converted to housing; Quelle Supríse! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693679140750
  11. The history A two-storey mill built in 1831 which resides two miles west of the town centre of Huddersfield. The Financial Reporting Council (FCR) of 1834 shows Armitage Bros already established here. The family name 'Armitage' pre-dates the 14th century, but it was Joseph Armitage (1778-1860) who significantly increased the family fortune and moved decisively into the gentry class. In 1822 he built the first woollen manufacturing mill at Milnsbridge, by the 1840's he handed over control of the business to his sons, who reconstituted it as a partnership called Armitage Bros, which survived until it became a limited company. By 1914 it was part of John Crowther's group. In the late 19th century John Crowther and his two sons moved from Marsden down the Clone Valley to Milnsbridge after purchasing two mills, where they began the successful production of woollen cloth. Crowther took his own life in 1931 and its thought that the death of his wife and the great depression were cumulative in this. Today parts of the mill are rented to a few small business, elsewhere derelict. The explore It's not often where in this neck of the woods... but when we are we always take a trip down Factory Lane. We've attempted this a few times... gates drawn, security breathing down our necks or locals asking us our intentions... seems if your walking round an abandoned building your the local scrap man even though your donning DSLR cameras. Anyway... been one of Crowther's we knew we were in for a treat. so.. sitting waiting.. waiting a bit more... we were in. The sheer size, the beautiful architecture, the remains of the mid century furniture... thank f*uck we drove down for a look. It looks like some of the mill buildings have been demolished at some point... but even so this place is huge!!! On entrance we were presented by a grand entrance hall which led into various areas of the mill... Of note was the sheer amount of mid- century furniture scattered around the mill... an entire floor decked with Parkay flooring... and a rather odd looking exercise bike that reminded us of a SinclairsC-5... we even came across a quad bike dumped in one of the corners of the mill. We loved it hear... its full of little gems hidden here and there we spent quite some time at the old mill as where not sure if we will be able to access this again... Some pics lbe
  12. With an ever lasting itch to explore a prison or police station that needed scratching, the time came to explore Brentwood Police Station. Unfortunately solo but a great explore despite! So after finding a good access point and choosing my moment wisely between passers by, I found myself within the grounds of the police station and soon inside. The building is mostly stripped out and a bare shell but that wasn’t the main sight to see, I had my mind set on finding the cells! After trying every door it was just my luck they were in the last place I looked. Attempting the court house adjacent the police station proved unsuccessful. History courtesy of Mockney Reject
  13. Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd was the largest film production company of Hong Kong. In 1925, three Shaw brothers - Runje, Runme, and Runde - founded Tianyi Film Company (also called Unique) in Shanghai, and established a film distribution base in Singapore, where Runme and the youngest brother, Run Run Shaw, managed the precursor to the parent company, the Shaw Organisation. In 1957, Run Run Shaw moved to Hong Kong, set up a new company called Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Ltd, and built a new studio at Clearwater Bay, which officially opened in 1961 as Movietown. In the mid-1960s, Movietown was the largest and best-equipped studio in Chinese filmmaking as well as the largest privately owned studio in the world, with 15 stages, two permanent sets, state-of-the-art film-making equipment and facilities, and 1,300 employees. The 1960s was a period of intense rivalry between Shaw Brothers and Cathay Organisation, but eventually Shaw Brothers gained the upper hand and Cathay ceased film production in 1970. Some of Shaw Brothers' most notable films were made in this period, including The Magnificent Concubine, The Love Eterne, as well as One-Armed Swordsman, which broke the box office records and spawned multiple sequels. Over the years the film company produced some 1,000 films, some of them being the most popular and significant Chinese-language films of the period. The studio popularised the kung-fu genre of films, which later included Five Fingers of Death and The 36th Chamber of Shaolin. In the 1970s, Shaw Brothers faced a strong challenge from a new studio, Golden Harvest, which had considerable success internationally with the martial arts film 'Enter the Dragon' starring Bruce Lee. Shaw Brothers then also began to co-produce films with western producers for the international market, and invested in films such as Meteor and Blade Runner. However, Shaw Brothers ceased film production in 1986 because of competition from Golden Harvest and increasing piracy, focusing instead on TV production. In 1986, Movietown became TV City, which was leased to TVB for TV production. In 1988, the company was reorganized under the umbrella of Shaw Organisation. In the 1990s, Shaw again started making a few films, but no longer on the same scale as before. In 2011 Shaw Brothers was reorganised into the Clear Water Bay Land Company Limited, its film production business being taken over by other companies within the Shaw conglomerate. Shaw Studios / Movietown has been vacant since 2003. There are plans to eventually turn it into a Grade I historical site but there is no sign of this taking place at the moment. Shaw Studios has since relocated to a new site in Tseung Kwan O, Hong Kong. Hong Kong is extremely hot and humid at this time of year, often with up to 95% humidity, so this was a tiring explore. The mosquitoes and cockroaches absolutely love it though so you're never short of a few friends along the way ..... If you ever come here, definitely pack some bug spray. Now, despite covering a lot of ground in a few hours here, we only managed to see a fraction of what is left. It's absolutely massive. There are a couple of active looking buildings but the majority is completely deserted. I wish we'd gone back to see the rest but too many #gintops (don't ask *smh*) got in the way. Hong Kong's a pretty epic place but I would recommend visiting at another time of year to avoid the humidity. There's a lot to explore so I may return next year. Shaw studios will be the first place I come back to if I do. For a more extensive report check out drhowser's report here > https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/shaw-bros-studios-hong-kong-sept-17.109830/#post-1182300 This building appeared to be set up for functions Studio named after George Clooney randomly Rooms of old film reels and projection equipment just lying around.... This was the guy who made it all happen. He lived until the age of 106!! RIP Sir Shaw 謝謝你的期待
  14. CAMELOT - Theme Park - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 This abandoned resort and theme park is located in the English county of Lancashire. The park's theme was based on the well-known story of King Arthur and the Knights of the roundtable After numerous takeovers, the theme park was purchased by Story Group and leased to Knight's Leisure who ran the park. However, it's closure was announced by the operator, in November 2012. In August 2014, an application to build houses on the site was unanimously rejected with 261 public objections. As of Feb 2018, the park stands empty a former shadow of its glory day slowly but surely falling victim to mother nature. A new housing development plan has been submitted, to many a protest from the local residents, However, if it does go through the once magical kingdom of Camelot will be lost forever. We gained entry into the former petting zoo and made our way to the middle of the park where we were caught by 4 security guards and a static full of dogs. Anyway, I hope you can enjoy the pics as its all I was able to get. Any feedback greatly appreciated.
  15. Town Mansion History The Town Mansion was originally built in 1912 by a wealthy petroleum importer. During the early 20th century, the area in which the mansion was built, had become a hub for many rich German families in the early 1900's. By 1918, once the First World War had come to an end and the town was heavily damaged by the intense bombing raids at the start of the war and then German occupation of Belgium in 1914. Only two houses in that street survived, the Town Mansion being one of those. It was then later occupied by a Belgium shipbuilder until the late 1960's, when it was used as an office space. The mansion was abandoned in 1991 and hasn't been formally resided in since. Visit Visited with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M and a non forum member. As I recall it was a particularly hot spring day and we all excited to see this location, partly to escape from the intense heat. Once we got inside we spent a short amount of time wandering around before we eagerly started taking our pictures. I can confidentially say that this is one of the grandest mansions in Belgium I have visited. I did wonder what the lives of the families that once inhabited it were like and the memories they must have had. It was a very enjoyable explore for me and as always, I hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading
  16. I know this place has been done many times before but it is right up my alley and was a tantalizing temptation whilst the rest of the family slept/swam in the villa pool. Thanks for the tip from a fellow member here. The last report/intel from here was 2014 so it has been a while. Things have changed security wise. The holes are patched up and there are 2 new heras style fences inside the main boundary. The main problem with these was that the point of tackling them was very exposed to the street and adjacent dock. Inside, not much has changed. The 'slot window' access point was amusing, the width being about an inch narrower than my back to chest distance and the height being about 4inches shorter than my groin to shoulder height. It took some contorting, and at one point I thought I was well and truly stuck, but in the end, I managed-I was too close to give up. 6am start meant it was a bit dark for photography. By the time I got out, the families were on their balconies and I yelled Ola to them as I jumped over the 4th and final barrier to safety. It was constructed in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún. Running gear and T/G were provided by Metropolitan Vickers. In 1986 The Spanish government commissioned a new Powerplant around 10km away on the other side of the bay. The plant was closed in 1991/2. The 2 rooms I really came for-
  17. Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  18. Hi all! Just a quick one this time, we decided to visit an old abandoned boatyard which also had an old car place inside as well. We couldn't find to much history on this one however it was nicely buried away in some trees/bushes along the side of the South Coast. Hope you enjoy the footage!
  19. Being a regular at the Nurburgring and this place being brought to my attention by a non explorer, the perfect opportunity after a day of storms arose! Putting this one off all week with temperatures reaching the 30s, the moment came on a somewhat stormy day to check this place out, taking full advantage of the slightly cooler – yet humid air. My first explore out of the UK too which made for something special, despite being a derp it was still something different and unique for myself in comparison to the UK. There’s not much left of the place and the history is scarce, however it looks as though work began rebuilding the place but the cost of development was a spanner in the works. The basement also contained a septic tank which is no longer allowed in the region, combining that with the nearest sewer being some distance away making development even more expensive.
  20. The Explore I actually explored this about eight weeks ago with Southside. I drove to Slough, Parked up and he had kindly found the way in before I got to the University Campus. The site is massive, and right in the centre of Slough. I work fairly close to Slough, and had seen the site some weeks before when collecting lunch from Roosters Piri Piri just opposite the site. It's kind of strange that its sat here for so long; its very close to London and land in this general area is typically very, very expensive. That does not of course, make Slough a pleasant place... I think there was a bit of an increase of traffic here after my visit, I have only just got around to editing these! Its amazing how such a large site has sat beneath the radar for such a long time!!! The Site Thames Valley University or TVU as its known; is part of the University of West London and formed part of a conglomerate of several campuses in Reading and West London. The closure of this Campus was announced in 2009 and the doors finally closed it's doors in 2010. The site has now fallen into disuse and it's 1000 students had to re-locate to other campuses around West London. Closure was blamed on the recession/credit crunch at the time; forcing the sale of the site. "Professor Peter John, TVU vice-chancellor, said: 'For the majority of students the closure of the campus will mean a move to one of our other locations either in Reading or West London. All those affected will be fully supported through the transition to minimise any possible disruption to their studies.' A total of 650 pre-registration nursing students at the Slough campus will be provided with a provisional timetable and have been told to pack their bags for the move to Reading by December this year." The site consists of two tower blocks (7 stories high), a ground floor canteen, a small circular building named "The Rotunda" which houses the University's Srudent Uninon, and a 2 story admin block. Plans were announced in 2017 to redevelop the site into 1,400 homes, but so far nothing has happened. Currently the site is owned by the Slough Council. It was a surprisingly relaxed explore. The road outside was very, very busy and all could be heard on the street outside. There were incredibly recent signs of a squat inside one of the rooms; fresh new sleeping bags and food dated for that day in bags; sandwiches, fruit etc. I could hear someone inside who I believe left when they heard us. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 Thanks for reading! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696167343975
  21. The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  22. An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  23. It’s been a while for various reasons but I am back and hitting the “move along, nothing to see here” central resource library… no seriously, nothing to see here. So after a brief chat with who turned out to be a long time reader and follower through instagram, we chose a spot to meet and hit the central resource library. Now to be honest, I was pre warned over a year ago that this place is absolutely trashed and I can confirm exactly that but it’s one I can now tick off the list. There’s not much to see, unless smashed windows and terrible graffiti is your thing so there is a lack of photos and hardly warranting a report, but here we go anyway! History wise? It’s a library… it closed and moved to a new location, that’s pretty much all I can say!
  24. History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  25. One of the objects located in the campsite. Why a house is bad. When I was inside, alone ... there was a squeaky door from everywhere and the cracking of the boards against each other. The blame for all this is borne by the wind and frost ... however, when you sit in such an object yourself, different thoughts come to mind. In fact, I was not alone ... my friend was outside ... but the distance between us (at a given moment and situation) was comparable to the width of the Vistula (in fact it was enough to just walk out the window). Great property, amazing atmosphere ... great rooms .... (Translator...sorry)
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