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  1. HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates. Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence) The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966. The original Holloway Prison (public domain image) Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing. Time to start the unofficial tour.... Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds Let's head straight into the cells... Dorm room Single prisoner cell Another dorm room Mural in one of the many winding corridors Twin room Lots of peely paint in some places There were several styles of cell Entrance into the prison... Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass Corridors lead into the prison Each area separated by iron gates Prisoner amenities and facilities Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre. Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use And gym facilities The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians Pharmacy Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls The chapel was large but pretty basic More inmate artwork Mural inside one of the rooms A room for presentations The prison's boiler house Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls High fences divided the exterior areas
  2. not much left , not vandalised and loads of decay and bird poo and dive bomming pigeons, been closed a few years now on with the pics thanks for looking
  3. all that remains of a decoy airfield small bunker type construction with a searchlight mounted on top and a small room at the back to house a gennerator fires would have been light at night at this location to fool the german bombers to target here instead of the real site a few miles away the searchlight platform is now fallien off and just a pile of bricks and metal thanks for looking
  4. Imagine that you are preparing yourself for an exploration for like a month and you are dreaming about it for like a year. Then the day finally arrives and EVERYTHING that could stop us happen at the same time. Not only this was a rainy day, but this was the infamous day that a bridge in Italy collapsed (I think that all of you heard about it), so the viability was totally blocked and we had almost run out of fuel. In addition this bomb shelter was actually really close to the bridge itself so there were many policemen and soldiers in the area. But at the end the exploration went smoothly. About the site itself... This was an air raid shelter built during World War II, but it was reserved only to the workers of a near steel mill. It is 2 kilometers long and it could hold more or less 4500 people. I know that somewhere there are some big cages full of rocks which are designed to protect the bunker from the shock wave of the bombs, but we could't find them. Even if I posted almost all the photos (because I think that all of them are important), here you can find the complete album at higher res: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmgY363L "Move rapidly; don't think only about yourselves, other your comrades are still outside in danger." "Do not stop: move on." Left: "Don't smoke; air polluted by smoke causes illness to many of your comrades; give proof of politeness." Right: "Zone reserved to the P.A.A squads." (I don't know what "P.A.A" stands for) These stairs are completely covered in limestone.
  5. Spotted this while out and about so popped in for a look, not a great deal left behind In the middle of a small town on the Shropshire border Had to be fairly quiet as it is surrounded by houses Looks like its not been lived in for a couple of years A stable block out back, loads of TV sets and old Playstation mags , one of which gives the name I gave the place thanks for looking
  6. First a little History [you all know it, but it's good to include anyway] 😃 The Dispensary – the first public hospital in North Staffordshire – opened in Etruria in April 1804 and was funded in part by the Wedgewood family. It gave sick patients the chance to see an Apothecary for diagnosis and treatment. It also provided vaccination against the dreaded smallpox, thanks to the pioneering work of Dr Edward Jenner. Shortly afterwards the 11-bed House of Recovery was opened for fever patients, followed by facilities to treat general and accident patients. The hospital continued to expand, due to a steady flow of general illness cases, accidents in the pottery, mining and iron industries and diseases caused by lead and dust. In 1819 it moved to a bigger site in Etruria. By this point it employed a small team of support staff, including a matron and nurses, and ran education programmes urging mine and factory owners to improve their safety standards. Thanks to new ideas about infection control, the building - surrounded by polluting factories - was increasingly seen as unsuitable for patients and was also at risk of collapse from heavy undermining. Eventually, the decision was made to move the infirmary to Hartshill. The clean, quiet suburb became home in 1869 to the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary, which later merged with the City General Hospital to form the University Hospital of North Staffordshire – now the Royal Stoke University Hospital. Previously the hospital was known as The North Staffordshire Infirmary and Eye Hospital (1815 - 1911) as well as The North Staffordshire Infirmary (1912 - 1926). The building closed down as a medical facility in 2012 as part of the super-hospital development at the Royal Stoke University Hospital. The explore: Visited with David [ Scrappy ]. It rained, a lot. 😀 The morgue was a bit of a let down as the slabs had recently been removed and placed in a nearby corridor in front of the fridges. Oh well.... On to the photographs, hope you enjoy:
  7. Great Yarmouth, or more accurately just Yarmouth is a typically tacky seaside town with mile upon mile of the stereotypical kind of tat and tasteless amusement arcades you only find on the shorelines of England. The kind of establishments that have lightweight wooden chairs that only the elderly find comfortable. If you ever get the chance to visit, politely decline at all costs! We had the misfortune of accidentally finding ourselves at a lose end in the area, the terrible weather on that drab Sunday morning only added to the misery, but the Winter Gardens, by its very nature, provided a nice bit of shelter from the pouring rain and anorak-clad diehard candyfloss eaters... A relic from the heyday of the English beach holiday, it is one of the few remaining places along the seafront to retain any of the Victorian charm that (probably) once adorned the town. It's basically just a big conservatory, so don't get excited! It has a bit of ok-ish ironwork and that's about it. But, if you like wearing wigs, climbing on shit and getting inside stuff that you're not supposed to go in, then this place is lots of fun, a satisfying playground for those of us who, to quote Leicestershire Police, have "anti-social" tendencies. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, Brewtal and a crazy lady named Jane! I'm sure they are so proud to have this mess in such a prominent position on their seafront Over the hoarding is even worse Inside is a bit better, if you're a fan of lightweight wooden chairs that only the elderly find comfortable. Dick! I bet the old dears loved this tropical island of seats. "Ohh look Dorris, let's sit under the palm trees. I've never been abroad" It felt just like a real jungle Surely not comfortable? They don't look old enough. Beep Dop Bappabop (that's robot speak for "Hey there, let me cup your balls") Of course there's a bistro! Right, fuck this shit.... Fun time! Not bad for 20p! On that note it was time to find somewhere worth visiting... But even the KFC had lightweight wooden bloody chairs that only the elderly find comfortable.
  8. History Maes Mynan care home was a two floor 33 bedroom care home on a site of 2.6 acres. The care home was for the elderly and it had its own day service and its own respite service for a short stay and emergency placements. The site was bought in 2013 by the healthcare company and has been left untouched since. The building itself we could not find much history about or anything about when the care home opened. Our Visit We decided to visit this place when we went out on a day trip to Engedi chapel (report will be up soon). On the way back we still had a lot of daylight left so we thought we would stop in and have a look at this site after seeing a report. The surrounding area was very overgrown and there was a long pathway leading up to the build. The site itself was in pretty good condition, well worth the visit if you have any free time. Be mindful if you do visit as just at the back of the site, there is a house that we assumed is occupied.
  9. not done a report in a while and have a nice backlog to catch up with . bit of an old explore this one ,its been arround for years but i wanted to see it anyway so off we went the milk factory has been closed since the 1970s , the milk was collected from the local farms and put in churns trains used to take the milk off to liverpool and other citys . there was a railway platform on the site but too overgrown to get any shots of it , altho the water tank was still there form the time when steam powerd the trains proposed for closure in the Beeching Report it managed to stay in use just for the factory nice natural decay and not vandalised it made for a good hour or so thanks for looking
  10. wanted to see this one for a few years , nice ammount of natural decay has taken over the main hut has now collapsed , older pics from here show it still dtanding but i think last winters snow done it in i know there are still more huts further down the site but the brambles prevented getting to them one of the floors was so rotten when i put my foot on it it went straight through and ate half my shoe, had to do a days exploring with only one and a half shoes . dib dib , urbex explore badge earned thanks for looking
  11. Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  12. spotted this while out with the family ,made a note where it was and went back for a look one room at the back had caught fire and collapsed in on the sitting room , i cant go to much into detail about the fire , it wasnt arson ,it is due to its location and proximity to somthing that causes sparks only a small place with 3 tiny bedrooms and a few bits and bobs lots of cobwebs and flies the light was left on to make it appear used , due to its location it will probably just get demolished eventualy and replaced with a new one thanks for looking
  13. Afternoon All, Ive finally got around to putting up afew photos from my recent trip to New York, and on my second day there i visited the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital Heres some info/history, i wont post it all as on the Wiki page, there is alot of history, which you can see here if you wanna see more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellis_Island_Immigrant_Hospital The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, also known as USPHS Hospital #43, was the United States’ first public health hospital, opened in 1902 and operating as a hospital until 1930. Constructed in phases, the facility encompassed both a general hospital and a separate pavilion style contagious disease hospital. The hospital served as a detention facility for new immigrants who were deemed unfit to enter the United States after their arrival; immigrants would either be released from the hospital to go on to a new life in America or sent back to their home countries. The hospital was one of the largest public health hospitals in United States history and is still viewed today as an extraordinary endeavor in the public health field.[5] The hospital is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument. While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island has been off-limits to the general public since its closing. Efforts to restore the hospital buildings and others on the island are being made by government partner Save Ellis Island. In October 2014, the hospital opened to the public for small-group hard hat tours.[6] The original immigration station on Ellis Island opened January 1, 1892, and processed 700 people that first day. In September of that year, the Hamburg-America steamer S.S. Moravia[7] arrived at quarantine with several confirmed cases of cholera. Every ship arriving in the port of New York was held at quarantine before being cleared to land. Passengers found to have dangerous contagious diseases were taken off ships at quarantine and transferred to the hospital at either Hoffman or Swinburne Island. Twenty-four of Moravia's passengers were ill and twenty-two deaths had occurred during the voyage. Many were children. It was believed that the outbreak occurred due to the ship taking on contaminated water from the Elbe river. The threat of a pandemic caused all shipping traffic to be suspended. The backlog of ships held at quarantine and the lack of adequate medical facilities to handle the volume quickly precipitated the need for a more robust healthcare facility to treat immigrants and merchant marine sailors. Twenty years after opening, the hospital, as well as Ellis Island itself, was in decline due to tightening restrictions on immigration in the United States. In 1930, the hospital closed its doors.[10] After the hospital was closed, the FBI occupied the space as an office through the 1930s. During World War II, disabled American servicemen were sometimes housed on the islands, as well as some German and Italian prisoners of war. After the war, many war brides were detained and sometimes treated on Ellis Island. During the 1940s, the hospitals were utilized to treat Merchant Marine sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and U.S. military personnel. During the postwar period, electroconvulsive therapy was employed as a method to treat mental illnesses. This was preferred over the archaic cold water bath therapy or hydropathy, which could cause hypothermia. In 1954, the islands were officially abandoned by the Coast Guard and declared “excess federal property”. In 1996, the World Monuments Fund listed the hospital as one of the world’s 100 Most Endangered Properties, a warning echoed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which put the buildings on the list of “most endangered historical places in the United States.” A study conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy estimated that with about $3 million of federal funding, the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital could be stabilized for the next 15 years. According to the Conservancy, 15 years would allow time to develop a long-term preservation plan You would have noticed some art on the walls in the photos, this was by a French street artist JR awakens history with his ‘Unframed – Ellis Island’ Exhibition. The tour and exhibition provide an immersive visual and sensory experience loaded with historical significance. It is not to be missed! ~ Rachael Silverstein, The Culture Trip The work, which is accessible by guided tour, will remain up “until it decides to disappear.” The Unframed—Ellis Island project aims to bring alive the memory of Ellis Island, the entry point to America for millions of immigrants. Coming from all over the world, leaving their belongings, their family and their past behind them, with the fear that they may be sent back to it, the presence of these people who have shaped the modern American identity can still be felt in the buildings, although abandoned for the past 70 years. This is the opportunity to interpret the stories of these people through art. JR’s exhibit lives in the abandoned Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, on the south side of the island. Archival photographs of the hospital’s patients and staff were artistically wheat-pasted around the abandoned hospital complex of Ellis Island’s south side, creating haunting scenes that bring the history of these rooms back to life. Thanks for looking DJ
  14. HISTORY Tenterden Town railway station is a heritage railway station on the Kent and East Sussex Railway in Tenterden, Kent, England. When the railway line first opened in 1900, Rolvenden Station was known as "Tenterden". Its name was changed when the line extended north three years later and a station closer to Tenterden was constructed. The new Tenterden Town station opened on 16 March 1903.The line closed for regular passenger services on 4 January 1954 and all traffic in 1961. It reopened on 3 February 1974 under the aegis of the Tenterden Railway Company which bought the line between Tenterden and Bodiam. The station now houses the KESR's Carriage and Wagon works, and the Colonel Stephens Museum is located nearby. EXPLORE So we set out on our explore with a list of places We wanted to check out. After a few not amounting to much and the next couple being total fails, we parked up and regrouped! The Tenterden site had been on my radar for a while (although I couldn’t be 100% about it’s location) so after a little discussion we decided to take a chance and head out to try and find the Lost Railway and its Train Graveyard. We headed toward the closest point by road, parked up and set off along a short path way. The area was really quiet apart from the odd dog walker. After literally five minutes we knew we were in the right place and could see the abandoned trains hidden amongst the trees. Access was easy literally a small hop over the fence and down the bank, there they were! Its the first time any of us had ever done an explore of this nature and it was amazing... Anyway here are some of the pictures we took throughout the explore. Thanks for reading 😊
  15. We went to this really impressed location. The security there is very high and some people said it is impossible to get in. We made it without any problems.
  16. Another backlog from a West Country Road Trip back in late May with Mookster, our American explorer friend and myself. This was our second stop off on our first day on the trip; our first being Tone Mills, a revisit for me so I haven't done a report, but with Tone its always a pleasure seeing it. A wonderful site each and every time. The three of us embarked on the large two day road trip in my trusty 1988 Volvo 240 and rocked up in Torrington that morning. This site has been derelict for absolutely years, but its in the arse end of nowhere so its taken a while to see it. - Closed in 1993; Dairy Crest's Creamery sat on a site which had been a creamery since 1874. This particular Art Deco site was built in the 1930's to meet needs, but When the government de-centralised milk collection,the creamery was finally killed off and it closed its doors; a severe blow to the area; with around 200 Job losses. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157699243815344
  17. This church was the reason why I wanted to go to Wales during my last trip to the UK. Thanks @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope for visiting this place with me. History (taken from The_Raw) Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  18. probably a well known site. It was more then 4 years ago that i visited this one so a revisit was planned. On a sunny Sunday I went alone to this site;following the same path as 4 yeas ago,but wanted to see some other parts of this giant plant. Walked there for more than 4 hours and still not seen everything. Unfortunately the metal thieves were also active that day,removing metal ,so sometimes little parts and bolts fell down near the blast furnace. They even used a grinder. Security had a day of I think. (heard that 2 weeks before,some explores were caught here by security). It makes U think. Again a nice view from the top,and nice place to take a break.When I was up there ,I heard a lot of sirens and fire trucks coming towards the site,but (un)fortunately) there was a small fire in a home near the site. 1. IMG_2238-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_2252-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_2357-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2312-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_2282-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_2362-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_2395-Pano-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 IMG_2381-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 IMG_2421-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 IMG_2429 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 IMG_2432 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 IMG_2447-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 13 IMG_2442 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 14 IMG_2375 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 15 IMG_2305-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  19. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  20. We didn't really know what to expect with this one, only found on Google Earth, few recent informations... But life can also be surprising, and this time, it was good ! 😄 Built during the 13th century and redesign during the 14th and the 18th, it was finally bought by a famous author in the mid 50's. Well known to be a writing haven for the writer, the castle is also known to have hosted some memorable parties with memorable people : Authors, journalists even politics... The Castle was sold a few years the death of his owner to a businessman who wanted to create a place dedicated solely to Art But nothing happened since then... The castle now stand, almost empty, in the middle of nowhere, waiting for a new life.
  21. Somewhere in a small french village is these castle located. Lot of rooms wich a fully furnished and a lot of other stuff are in the rooms. There are also more then 100 books.
  22. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  23. This time I was actually in vacation with two friends of mine (they aren't explorers), but while we were organising all of our trip we decided to explore this abandoned and untouched printing works (hope that this is a proper name) that I had discovered a few weeks before. Those 2 guys were a couple of graphic designers so they enjoyed the visit even more. This plant used to create mostly the "Action Transfers", which are called "Trasferelli" in Italy: today they are produced mostly on commission and not for business. If you want the complete album, here it is: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmr2nWrm
  24. History This Octel site in Amlwch was chosen in 1949 to collect bromine from the sea, it was picked by H Fossett and R O Gibson because of the strong tidal flow, the depth of the sea in the area and gulf stream sea temperatures. The plant was built and finished construction in 1952, ready to start collecting the bromine out of the sea. The site was officially owned by Octel until 1989 when the production of bromine chemicals became more important which resulted in Great Lakes purchasing the site due to them specialising in bromine chemistry. In 1995, one of the BOT2’s that was used for collecting bromine chemicals was badly damaged by a fire that occurred on the site. Two of the 30-metre towers were destroyed and around 5 people were injured. Octel bromine works started their operations in 1952 and closed in 2004. Canatxx purchased the site and announced plans to turn the site into a liquid natural gas storage site. Our Visit This is one site that we have kept our eye on for a while, but never got around to visiting. Finally, we decided to pay the site a little visit and we were not disappointed with what it had to offer. We made sure to visit on a sunny, bright day so we could spend as much time as we needed to explore the whole site. It took us a good few hours to explore the whole site but was definitely worth the time and drive there.
  25. Recently we visited the Jean Monnet building of the European Commission in Luxembourg city, which is about to be demolished. The building was closed because they discovered asbestos in the air in block C. Unfortunately, we came too late and the most interesting part (Conference Centre) was already destroyed, but we managed to see the offices (mostly empty) and the sport centre with swimming pool in the basement. If you decide to go there, don't go to the building C, especially the lower floors!!! They have started demolishing them, we came in to one of the floors, and saw a creepy room completely covered with white film, from floor to ceiling, including doors and windows. Apparently, to protect the workers from asbestos. Just don't go there) Otherwise, buildings A and B are still fine. The keys on one of the pictures are from the data centre. It's now empty, they only left the keys) Here are also a couple of maps in case if someone wants to visit the place. The most interesting thing is that the building is guarded. Security are there 24/7. They are outside near building A, so be careful with the lights! At the level 2, at the border between buildings A and B, I left a short note on the side of one of escalators. You can try to find it) See the last picture, and the place is marked with big yellow circle on one of the maps.
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