Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags '2018'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 105 results

  1. An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  2. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading.
  3. History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  4. This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany. This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown. The only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites. IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  5. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  6. I was passing here today on way home from work so called in to have a look ...Quite a nice little explore ☺️
  7. History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  8. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  9. Chateau Sarco – France Built in the 19th century. Once owned by the ministry and sold in 2008 for just under 4 Million euro and abandoned ever since……
  10. One of my favorites from my first Italy trip. For a industry freak like me it can't get any better then this. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  11. Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Diolch am edrych eto
  12. Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  13. Premier inn Manchester Visited with @GK-WAX and @vulex we was after a little get together so decided on a nice relaxed evening chilling on the Manchester skyline. After a very hot day was good to unwind and take in Liverpool he view and watch the world go by below us. DSC_3169 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3172 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3175 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3165 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3152 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3150 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3134 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3117 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3187 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3184 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3183 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3180 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3182 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3121 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3135 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3138 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3148 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3153 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3157 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3161 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3162 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3164 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3176 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  14. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  15. La Morgue Prelude is situated on a massive hospital site. The hospital originally opened in the 1860’s, the hospital itself is still in use today but large parts of it is unused and getting renovated.
  16. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  17. This former school swimming pool was built in 1904 and abandoned in 1997. I happened upon it randomly and had a hunch that there might be a swimming pool inside but didn't expect much given the state of the exterior. Well, it turned out to be pretty decent inside. Clearly nobody has been inside here for a very long time. The pigeons have set up shop and went absolutely bonkers when they saw me. They've really done a number on the place, or should I say a number two? It's pretty minging to be honest but at least there's no shitty graffiti or vandalism. This was a night visit so I had to light paint all my shots. I didn't do too badly considering but it would be cool to see it in daylight. Hopefully someone else will have a look soon. This long curtain covered spectator seating for some reason The floor up here was well dodgy, you can just about see some holes on the left of shot Cheers for looking
  18. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  19. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
  20. After visiting the site last year, and only making it half way down the 'stairs of death', and all the other entrances completely sealed, we decided to head back and give it another shot.. This time the stairs were even more dangerous, and were completely missing a huge section of steps, that had been completely destroyed. After deciding it a wasn't a great idea to continue further, we decided to see if any of the other entrances were open, and to our surprise we found a way in!! Fresh soil had been put down around the area, and it looked like work had been taking place, so not sure what the future of the bunker is at the moment. There's not a great deal left inside, but the tunnels themselves make for some decent photos!
  21. An old train repair facility. Linked with one of the big steel works in Belgium. Now all closed. Things date back to around 2012. I think it closed around this time. the place isn't a bad mooch. a few people living inside taking copper.
  22. Another short report from me, this was my second Urbex excursion so I'm keeping them short to kinda test the waters a bit before I go all out and find bigger places (or at least more interesting ones) with better equipment. I couldn't find anything about the place online but from what I gathered someone was evicted and then burglars came and stripped the place. That's just what I got from the graffiti drawn on by someone who has never attended an English class, although there are a lot of those types around here XD. Anyway, enjoy the pictures!
  23. On my way back from Belgium I stopped at Maison Kirsch at Luxemburg. #1 DSC01703-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC01743-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC01705-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC01737-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC01710-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC01745-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC01712-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC01749-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC01714-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC01742-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC01718-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC01729-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC01730-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC01731-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC01733-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC01746-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC01752-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC01756-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  24. The once grand Bureau Central administration building now stands decayed and rotting, but still retains nearly all of it's character. History The Bureau Central was the main offices for the de Wendel Family Metal company. The Family had been involved in metal industry since the 18th Century. By the 19th Century they were the 3rd largest iron company in Franc. In 1870 they became the largest iron company after a major furnace upgrade successfully modernised their production. During this period they employed 7000 people and were producing 112,500 tonnes of iron and 134,500 tonnes of pig iron each year. When they expanding to steelmaking, they needed a grand main office to impress customers and keep on top of their every growing enterprise, and so in 1892 Central Bureau was built. In 1926 the Bureau Central was expanded to cope with the still growing paperwork. The de Wendal iron enteprise continued to flourish until the post WW2 period where business fell into a decline. The mining industry was nationalised and eventually the whole family company was completely nationalised. Bureau Central was abandoned in the 1980's after a company merger. The building itself is listed and protected. The Explore The first attempt at Bureau Central was a bit of a fail as there was a worker cutting trees right behind the building, exactly where I needed to be. So I went off to explore a plan B (Terre Rouge) and returned a few days later on a Saturday morning when it was much quieter, and I got in with no drama this time. The building is very decayed and has been well trashed. Looking at older photos it seems its been in a bad state of decay for a number of years, and not much has changed recently. It's got 4 levels including a huge basement level. The building is pretty big, with lots of rooms, but most of them are empty and layered in collapsed ceiling material. However the grandeur, architecture and nice lighting makes it the most photogenic explore I've done for a while. The long corridors, skylights and peeling paint tick all the boxes of a good decay photo. I was there alone for a couple hours until 5 German Explorers showed up to explore it too. Turned out to be a really decent bunch too. A cracker of an explore! Photos
  25. Hi all! We decided to hit the road and head for Staines to take a look at an industrial warehouse which was still full of all the old stuff! I couldn't find much history about the place as it is very old and from what I can see dates back to 1919 so a very long time. The explore was awesome, checking out all of the old machinery in the building and having a good wonder around! Access was fairly straight forward after having a quick scout of the building but once inside we were amazed at how big this place actually was! Anyway please feel free to check the footage!
×