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  1. Treading a well worn path to this behemoth of a building The foundation stone for Greenbank Drive Synagogue was laid on 14 June 1936 by Baron Tobias Globe attended by the Chief Rabbi of the British Empire, Dr J H Hertz. The building was consecrated on August 15 1937 and opened by Professor Henry Cohen (a member of the congregation and later Lord Cohen of Birkenhead). The basement area of the building was originally used as a youth centre and the synagogue had its own scout troop (the 22nd Wavertree). During the blitz in 1941 Greenbank Drive Synagogue was used as a reception centre for bombed out families in Liverpool and held a non-Jewish service at Christmas. It was also used as a social centre during the war by American Jewish GIs stationed at an air base in Burtonwood, Warrington. After the war they presented a plaque to the congregation (displayed in the entrance hall). In May 1959 a burglar started a fire that destroyed the Ark and Torah scrolls and part of the roof structure. The building was subsequently restored by the original firm of architects at a cost of £50,000 and re-consecrated in 1961. Due to increasing competition the youth centre closed at this time. A further fire occurred in two first floor offices behind the ladies' gallery in 1965 but damage was confined to the former areas. The building ceases active use on January 5 2008.
  2. Built in the 18th century Minera Hall was the former family home of the Dutons a timber importing magnate whose buisness collapsed when japan invaded Burma in WW2 halting the teak trade latterly in the later part of the 20th Century the hall became the villabe RBL club and now stands empty and derelict The dry/wet rot battle spooked me when I first saw it never sen out like it before
  3. Another well visited place May 2019 Formerly it used to be some form of home for single mothers with children apparently from ireland (salvation army maternity home) , also kim catrell was apparently born there Now the depressing bit Two brothers were fined more than £82,000 after their “depressing, unhygienic and unsafe” care home was shut down by inspectors. These breaches were assessed by CQC as extreme, as the seriousness of the concerns placed a significant risk on the lives, health and well-being of the people living in the home. The premises were unsafe and poorly maintained. There was insufficient hot water and unsafe windows in many people’s bedrooms. The premises were also unclean and placed people at risk from infection. People were smoking in the building where the fire detection units were faulty and oxygen cylinders were also present which caused a considerable fire hazard. The list goes on and on thankfully no one died as a consequence the above issues
  4. A short little report from a little while back. Without going into too much detail this building is one of the more longer abandonments situated on the ground of a partially used hospital some where in the south. The ground around the building has been flattened and at the time of our visit workers were at it digging the land up or something like that. After sneaking past the workers and into the building we spent a short period inside before the noise of wooden boards being cut filled the area. We got out before we couldn't anymore... DSC_1785-HDR DSC_1791 DSC_1794 DSC_1773-HDR b DSC_1777-HDR Anyways that'll be all.
  5. I have been to Sculthorpe many times as it is local to me.but I have never ever seen the bomb stores in all my visits there.so seeing as I ain't been for a few years I thought I would try the bomb stores.situated over the other side I approached them from a different way.a long walk through fields and then I got to the fence,I thought I was going to have to give up,then I found a little gap.Whilst I was there I gave the control tower another look as I have only been in it the once.RAF Sculthorpe started off life as a satellite base to West Raynhasm in the second world war.after the war it had a total overhaul and in 1943 it was handed over too the US airforce.over the years all sorts of planes were based here.including B-45 bombers.capable of delivering nuclear warheads.these bombers was America's first deployment of planes since the second world war.Sculthorpe was known locally as quite a secretive base.a lot of plnaes use to come here what were not standard to the normal US airbases.the runway was one of the longest in Europe and was heated.it was said that the runway was one of the designated runways to take the space shuttle if it ran into trouble.the base was closed at the ed of the cold war.the domestic and technical sites were sold,the airfield side was retained and is used for training.I have been up there in the evening and seen the Americsan hercs flying low dropping parachutes, and occasionally landing the planes. The bomb stores were not as big as some I have visited as in amount of buildings.but I get the impression a lot of the buildings have been demolished over the years. Old warning signs around the perimeter fence. The tower you have to be a bit careful of getting this right as it is I the middle of the airfield so best to get a quiet weekend morning.the tower is only one of four built.one at Raynham which is being done up as a residential place,and a great job they are doing of it too.one is demolished.and the other is in use still. They even had there own bar in the tower. I found this building a little bit off distance from the tower what I had never bee in. Whilst iwas here I decided to give some of the other buildings a look.the comms and MP block,the two storey block,and three storey block,school and mess.sadly these are starting to look worse with a lot more graffiti than there ever was in them. Communications and MOD block, there is also a plotting room for operations inside and other briefing rooms. The Truman is a large three storey accommodation block for single personnel. It had phone booths and social room and shower blocks. he school and sergeants mess. which had a dining hall and social club and several accommodation rooms. There quite a few smaller blocks for accommodation too. These are just two storey and an S shape. The telephone exchange And finally one bit ihave not seen before either.the old base shop.it was located near the accommodation blocks and the housing estate.and would have served the families and personnel.it had been opened up again as a shop but without much luck it seems.
  6. The Site Dating back to 1874 these works have produced sodium carbonate common in cleaning products, dyes, fertilizers and other such products. The works have been operated under Brunner Mond, Imperial Chemical Industries, and TATA Chemical Europe. The works were also responsible for "accidentally" creating polythene in 1933 during an experiment. TATA Europe closed these works in 2014 along with the attached power station responsible for power supply. Photos DSC_0894 DawnOfControl_ReEdit-2 MergingEras DustNRust DSC_1150-HDR DSC_1196-HDR DSC_1207-HDR DSC_1044-HDR Anyway That'll be all.
  7. History Kelenföld Power Plant is located in Budapest and was originally established in 1914, in conjunction with Hungary's electrification program. It was known as one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced throughout Europe and supplied electricity to the entire capital. The site itself featured the first boiler house as an electrical supply building in the city. Between 1922 and 1943 the plant underwent two extension phases which introduced 19 modernised steam boilers and 8 turbines. These were operated at 38 bar steam pressure and transferred the increasing demand for electricity through 30 kV direct consumer cables. The equipment used was considered state of the art at the current time and was all produced by Hungarian manufacturers. By the 1930s the facility contributed to 60% of Budapest's heating and hot water which made up 4% of the country's overall energy supply. The infamous Art Deco control room, also known as 'Special K' was completed in 1927, after two years of construction. Designed by notable architects Kálmán Reichl and Virgil Borbíro, because of this, it's listed as a protected site under Hungarian law and cannot be restored or destroyed. The Kelenföld control room is widely acclaimed as one of the most stunning monuments of industrial art. It uniquely explores the boundaries between functionality and grandeur, featuring a decorative oval skylight alongside the retro style green panels, hosting a range of buttons, dials, and gauges. Once the Second World War had begun, a small concrete shelter was added for the employees. This was due to the ornate glass ceiling, as it was considered to be a target during the bombing raids in the city. By 1962 the plant was modernised again with accordance to the heat supply demands of the capital. The existing condensing technology was replaced with back pressure heating turbines and hot water boilers. This increased reliability, as coal was steadily becoming more outdated and inefficient. In 1972 gas turbines with a capacity of 32 MWe were integrated into the plant and were the first to be put into operation throughout Hungary. In 1995 another redevelopment phase was initiated which provided the power station with a heat recovery steam generator and later on in 2007 a water treatment plant was established. The control room itself was closed in 2005, since then it has been featured in a few well-known films such as the Chernobyl Diaries and World War Z. Other areas of the site remain active through private ownership, with buildings still providing power to Budapest. Our Visit We arrived in Budapest feeling cautiously optimistic, we had other locations on our agenda for the weekend but Kelenföld was a significant reason for our visit. It's something I've wanted to see since I started exploring a couple of years ago and failure was not an option for us. We had 3 days and therefore 3 attempts (at the minimum) to access it. Fortunately for us, we managed to get in the first time around and we couldn't have really asked for a better way to kick off the trip. Once we made it inside the plant we found ourselves lost in a maze of locked doors and sealed off sections. Understandably they wanted to make it as difficult to get into the control room as possible. Whilst searching we heard the familiar sound of nearby footsteps and radio so we quickly found a decent spot to hide. "We have to keep moving, if we stay here we'll get busted," I said to my exploring partner, after a handful of excruciating minutes, listening to them steadily get closer and so we pressed on. Without giving too much away we managed to find our way to the main spectacle and were instantly blown away by it's immense beauty. So without further ado, onto the photos! Unfortunately, with the security guard on the hunt for us we decided to bounce before getting caught ((more so my other half than myself.) As much as I would have loved to stay, I didn't argue. Means we have an excuse to go back! As always if you've got this far, hope you enjoyed reading my report
  8. Explored with my partner, who told me about this place, was completely unaware that i was passing it on the bus every day until she told me about it... Wasn't really expecting it to be that good but really enjoyed it. Didn't look like we were going to find a way in at first but i found what i thought was a pretty cool access point, even if it was a bit cobweby Not sure exactly when it closed but they closed due to being an awful place to leave your dog, they sound pretty bad and from what I've heard i wouldn't leave a dog with them. Here is a 'review' from 2008; "We have used the one at Greeba a few years back and I decided not to return when, on collection, our Lab jumped into the boot of the car with such force that he, literally, bounced back out again. I also read in the paper not long after that they had lost a dog and some kind of hearing resulted. I can't remember if they had their licence revoked or had been fined, but they stopped taking boarders after that."
  9. may 2019 Anzio Camp The Anzio Camp is situated near Leek in Staffordshire. The camp was first used by the US Army in 1943, to house troops. In 1945/6 the camp was taken over by Polish troops. After the war it was used as a civilian settlement by the Poles until 1963/4 when they were moved to a purpose built site half a mile north of the camp I cannot find much information on what the camp was used for between 1963 and the early 80's. In 1980 the MOD took over the site and it was used as a training camp for Regular and Territorial Army troops and also scouts and cadets. The camp closed in 2004 as it was deemed surplus to requirements by the MOD It was bought in 2006 by care operator John Munroe Hospital, of Rudyard, with a view to developing a care home. But the site was again sold, in July 2007, to a consortium of Courtyard Property Group and Smartwright Developments. Planning officers recommended that the planning application is refused on the grounds that the site lies within open countryside on the fringe of the Peak District National Park, which is designated as a Special Landscape Area. In 2010 the site was sold again to an Air soft company called first and Only.
  10. Came across Abandon Factory didnt know what it was at first, May 2019 Kwik Save is a British discount supermarket chain that was founded in Wales. It had shops across the United Kingdom. It went into administration in July 2007, but was brought back in April 2012. Its shops were small to medium sized high street supermarkets, mainly located in areas with below average incomes. It struggled to make profits during the 2000s, as superstore operators such as Asda, Tesco and Sainsbury's introduced their own budget brands, and foreign discounters such as Lidl, Aldi and Netto (who all arrived in the United Kingdom during the first half of the 1990s) expanded.[1] The company was listed on the London Stock Exchange, and was once a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index. It went into administration on 6 July 2007, and closed most of its shops across the United Kingdom, with the remaining 56 being sold to a new company, FreshXpress, which itself went into administration in March 2008.[2] It was then resurrected in a smaller form with nine shops, but this second incarnation of FreshXpress went into administration, and ceased trading in 2009. All remaining shops have since been closed.[3] In 2012, the brand was relaunched as a budget fascia for convenience shops supplied by Costcutter.[4][5]
  11. History This colliery was opened in 1901 due to the increasing demand of coal in this heavy industrialized area of Germany. After that this coal mine grew rapidly in the amount of employees and the amount of coal that was made in this place, this complex made on its peak around 9000 tons coal per day. In 1997 this coal mine was sold to another big german coal mining concern. in 2010 this place needed to be shut down to new environmental reasons and because mining coal in this area was outdated and too expensive. Our explore: when we went to this place we didn't really knew what to expect of this place this was because we didn't really saw any photos of this place at that time, i only knew that there was a nice cooling tower on this site and that there was a control room somewhere. When we entered the complex we could pretty much walk free around, there warent any camera's or sensors at the time of exploring. After walking around for awhile we found an entrance to the admin building. When we got inside we were absolutely staggered with the state this building was in. Everything was still like the closing day in 2010, and it was really nice and warm inside (75 degrees Fahrenheit). There was also an amazing room full of baskets, this one is probably one of the better examples. I really liked exploring this place! Elephant by Hooismans, on Flickr Bergwerk HR by Hooismans, on Flickr Cooling Tower by Hooismans, on Flickr Cooling Tower by Hooismans, on Flickr Bergwerk HR by Hooismans, on Flickr Baskets by Hooismans, on Flickr I also made a video of this place where i tell the history of this place. And where i explain were certain rooms were used for. It is is dutch but i has Subtitles. Thanks for reading through!
  12. Before heading to this colliery, we had been viewing photos of the recent demolition. Images of headstocks lying crumpled on the ground didn't exactly give us much hope, but without any other options until much later in the day, we headed on to see if there was at least a scrap of something nice left behind. It turned out that it was largely the plant side of things that had been demolished, and these areas often turn out to be fairly uninspiring anyway. To our surprise, a big handful of buildings were left behind, including the bath house, admin, and the tall winding tower, which was our first target. Visited with @AndyK!, Terminal Decline and @extreme_ironing The colliery operated from 1901 until 1997, when the site was acquired by RAG, at which time it became Bergwerk Ost. It was fully shut down in 2010. Winding Gear - The next target was the bath house and admin building, just a quick dash across the road - Lamp room - Admin - A typical zeche atrium - Some front areas were quite grand - Next was the power house, which turned out to be much better than expected - Upon first glance, the building appeared to be completely turbine free, only revealing only a large hall and an alright looking control panel - But upon further inspection, we found this tasty greenboi, which made it all the more worth it - There's a couple more bits to see here, would be interesting to see inside if anyone manages to crack the last bits before it's fully redeveloped. Cheers 👍
  13. I saw the old trailers on some waste ground and lo and behold behind them was an old transport and engineering hub deserted now
  14. First of two places we got onto that day, we had about 4 places in our sights & this was the only one that was on our list that we managed to get into. A great explore & a lot more to see than i was expecting. Most of the upper floors were fallen/falling through. The person that told me about this place described it as 'the old nunnery' but there doesn't seem to be any evidence of it actually being a nunnery. From what i can tell it used to be the house of the vicar/priest/whatever that worked in the church across the road. Permission has been granted for the demolition of the existing building and construction of 51 sheltered housing units. the previous occupant certainly knew how to have a good time
  15. Hi all! Not sure on the history of this place but its been around a while. Not a bad place. Not that exciting but we were passing so thought we would have a mooch! A couple of nice cars.
  16. The Italians don't mess around when it comes to architecture and this old sanatorium is no exception. Built in 1924 in an art deco style, it began life as a tuberculosis hospital before being converted into a generic hospital in the 1950s. In 2015 it closed down to make way for a new hospital. Most of it has been completely emptied now but the admin building and chapel are stunning regardless. The vast network of tunnels are pretty epic as well with workshops, locker rooms and some odd looking stretchers amongst other things down there. They connect every single building in the complex so you can access certain buildings that are sealed from outside. It's a big old place with a lot to see. I've been twice and still not seen it all. Wards Tunnels Admin Block The Chapel Thanks for looking
  17. Originally the Sea View Hotel, Cautley House is in every way as bland and and tacky as I expected. Built in 1888, it was extended to the east in 1906, became the Seabrook Hotel in the 1960s, Alfred’s Hotel in the 1980s and then a christian healing centre in around 1994. A care home was next on the agenda once the healing centre closed in 2011/12, it didn’t happen though as the building needed updating and was deemed unfit for such use. So it’s just sat empty since, although there used to be a live-in guardian person, but with the disuse and the decay commencing over a number of years they left too. Now plans are in for demolition it’s days as any kind of establishment are numbered, probably to be replaced by the non-affordable homes that keep springing up round here. And despite being accessible in some way or another most of that time it’s pretty untrashed apart from naturally falling apart. Some history and old pics here Entrance/reception area/groud floor rooms Later extension housing the dance floor and DJ booth/sacrificial altar with added air con Main stairs up to the locally-named suites All the rooms were equally as meh, so much shades of beige in this place with 70s style avocado bathroom suites too. And balcony cat-flaps. The most fucked part was the 1906 extension Some signage and stuff There you have it, worth an hour or so if you're in the area
  18. On my way home from an overnight explore down south, it seemed a shame to waste the beautiful summer-like days we were having in mid-February, so I decided to stop off at RAF Coningsby's old weapons storage facility. It's not all that far from where I live, and I'd been meaning to take a look whenever I had a chance, so this seemed like the ideal opportunity. History RAF Coningsby Remote Weapons Store, as the name suggests, is a facility built for the purpose of storing and preparing weapons including missiles and bombs, situated in a separate compound close to the outer edge of the main airbase. The facility was built in order to reduce the quantity of explosives stored within the base, therefore reducing the number of personnel and aircraft exposed to risk. An incident occurred in 1971 when an electrostatic discharge caused a SNEB rocket that was being prepared to initiate its rocket motor. Two armourers were killed, and this could be one of the reasons for deciding to build the store further away. RAF Coningsby itself is operational as Quick Reaction Alert station, and is home to Eurofighter Typhoons from No. 3 Squadron, No. XI Squadron and No. 29 Squadron. Little information is available about the history of the bomb store, but this is no surprise owing to the fact it belongs to an active RAF base. The facility has separate storage and preparation facilities and does not appear on historic maps dated 1977 or earlier. Hardened Aircraft Shelters were constructed within the airbase from 1981-1987 to accommodate Tornado Jets. The Tornados were capable of carrying a range of missiles and weaponry, so it is likely the weapons storage facility was built around the same time as the hangars to service the weaponry for those aircraft. The facility appears to have been out of use for a good number of years. Aerial view of the weapons store as seen on Google Maps This hand-drawn plan was found within the site View down the road of section 1 Storage areas in section 4 The entrance to storage area 14C Building 21F entrance Building 12 contained this mobile communications unit Inside the mobile comms unit There were also some opened crates of naval gun mounts Missile Servicing Bay and an ivy-clad building Inside the ivy building Missile Servicing Bay A few of the other buildings scattered around the site... Looking over to the command centre Inside the command centre Bunk beds I'm not sure what this does, but it looked pretty cool Huge diesel generator Sentry post at the east gate Eastern gateway
  19. An interesting drive back yesterday got close to accessing an old hotel before the squatters dogs kicked off then came across some DERPy caravans and cool motors
  20. It is alas more DEPy now Lavino Solar Fires and Fireplaces Ltd Flintshire
  21. A nice local one today; had many a great night in here it closed in 2012 with the building of the new by pass killing trade Only accessed the pub the adjoining function suite locked tight shut alas Friday night in the adjoining converted barn was rock night in the 70s as a teenager
  22. Built in the early 20th century this church closed its doors in 2008. Although there was an open window and a ladder I decided to take the way through the tubular shaft beneath the church to enter the location. It has been something I've been looking forward to since planning the trip. Unhappily I did'nt expect 3 days of bad muscle soorness. 😒 😂 I have to admit that i left by the window. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 upstairs next #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19
  23. It has taken me a few months to finally find this place; it is hidden in the middle of nowhere: A cottage ;2 caravans and 3 sheds crammed full with all sorts of wonderful treasure from engineering stuff to quality vintage porn The owner died a single man aged 78 yrs in 2016
  24. The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though! Thanks for looking
  25. Afternoon, Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up Heres some history from googles... The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2] Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2] The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2] During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2] On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2] In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6] We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though... On to some pics Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Thanks for looking DJ
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