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  1. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  2. CAMELOT - Theme Park - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 This abandoned resort and theme park is located in the English county of Lancashire. The park's theme was based on the well-known story of King Arthur and the Knights of the roundtable After numerous takeovers, the theme park was purchased by Story Group and leased to Knight's Leisure who ran the park. However, it's closure was announced by the operator, in November 2012. In August 2014, an application to build houses on the site was unanimously rejected with 261 public objections. As of Feb 2018, the park stands empty a former shadow of its glory day slowly but surely falling victim to mother nature. A new housing development plan has been submitted, to many a protest from the local residents, However, if it does go through the once magical kingdom of Camelot will be lost forever. We gained entry into the former petting zoo and made our way to the middle of the park where we were caught by 4 security guards and a static full of dogs. Anyway, I hope you can enjoy the pics as its all I was able to get. Any feedback greatly appreciated.
  3. Visited back in Early Feb with Mookster and an American Explorer friend, who is over on an educational placement. We had quite a Northern Road Trip planned; with around 18 sites on our list, but sadly did about 4 or 5 over two days. Annoying but that's the nature of this beast! Cellars Clough Mill was originally owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. Sam also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by company Fisher, Firth & Co. which named the mill "Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd", managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has since been dissolved and the mill is believed to have closed in the 80s. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful because it was discovered that bats were found to be residing insude mill. The bats cannot be forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually move on. Wings of the mill have been demolished; presumably to let nature in and destroy the mill? #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157692916601562
  4. Not much online about this one, it used to be a smelting yard which also carried out other work such as Automotive and presumably welding of sorts. A nice little mooch for 45 mins or so. Its had a recent fire, unfortunately destroying quite a rare model of Datsun stored inside. Visited with Mookster and our American Explorer friend on a February Northern Road Trip. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157668230304678
  5. Another one of our February Nothern Road Trip with Mookster, our American friend and myself. A bit of a strange one this. An old mill, but vastly converted for commercial use and modernised. Massively decayed in places. There isn't much early history on the mill building itself; but it has been extended over the years to accommodate the increasingly expanding business Dronsfield Mercedes until its closure in around 2009. The building has workshop areas, storage areas, offices and also a living quarters. Dronsfields Mercedes are the largest independent Mercedes car & commercial vehicle specialist in Europe. A Saddleworth based company based at Wall Hill Mill. This family run business has over 30 years experience in the industry. The Dobcross site covers 8 acres, which means the company were able to fully fulfil customers requirements directly from under one roof while on the site. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694322755981
  6. History Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts. Explore This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States. Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia. Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River. (1) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) ( (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) Cheers for Looking
  7. Hey, guys here's my video report on the #post-apocalyptic #Camelot #ThemePark. I've already made a photographic report with a full history etc so I won't bore you with that here as it is featured in the footage. Thanks for any feedback guys take it, easy man. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  8. First did this location couple of years ago its a real nice spot as we were in the area it would have been rude not to revisit ..... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 18. 19. 20. 21. Cheers for looking Oldskool ..............
  9. Former Latvian Consulate Charnock Richard - Feb 2018 I'm posting this to save you a journey lol, plus I wanted to at least make some use of the time I spent there even if the photos aren't the greatest! Pemberton farm was the former home of Howard J Pym Honorary Consul For Latvia and his family. The property was renovated in 2005 and the Pym family lived here until 2007. Timber Latvia Ltd was registered at Pemberton farm incorporated in 2010 but later dissolved. Since then the property has been on on the market for close to one million pounds, however, it now lies in a state of utter destruction thanks to vandals and arsonists and almost nothing remains of its former glory. Unfortunately, that is all the info I could gather on this place and I'm sure you'll agree from the pics it is a no-go, however, we did find thousands of spent ammunition rounds so if you can then please let me know what you think they are.
  10. Churchills Pub Bolton - Feb 2018 This week on Bygone Pubs we take a look into the derelict Grade two listed #Churchills #pub in #Bolton #Lancashire Formerly #TheRoseHillTavern. Many a #BoltonWanderers fan will remember a match day at Burnden Park then off to Churchills for a good old pint. Unfortunately, though the memories are all that remains.
  11. The Old Sodality Club #Leigh Lanc's This video is the first of my new series #bygonepubs where Il be documenting the steady decline of these wonderful gathering holes as the corporations' franchises and chains etc increase their stamp on society. I've had wonderful feedback from many people since posting this video on "cough cough" Facebook, who've told me many wonderful stories about the place before it was lost to economic decline thank's to the powers that be. I believe the place closed in 2010 ish and was once a popular watering hole for many a denizen. From parties to football to darts and karaoke the place once bustled with the familiar tone's of friendship and alcoholism "Swigs his Guinness". You can almost hear the faint echoes of the past in places like these so I'd like to share my documentation of the place in a video format as I did not get many pics. Thanks for any feedback guys. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  12. The Old Unknown Farmhouse - Chorley - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 I struggled to find any history on this stunning location except for the multitude of artifacts left inside from photographs to a pencil sketch by a man called Brian jay and the possibility that the property was once owned by a freemason. I have to admit guys this was my favorite explore to date. From the artifacts in and around the property including that stunning Vauxhall, my favorite find to date. To the general atmosphere of the old place. I had a quality time man and a trip back through it.
  13. Rylands Mill - Pagefield College campus - Video Report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Hope this video report meets the standards for the sight, any feedback greatly appreciated as I just want to share my experiences with you guys not start selling caps and tee shirts and begging you to subscribe thanks.
  14. Daresburyhall - Photographic report - Feb 2018 Daresbury Hall is a former Georgian country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. the hall descended in the Heron family until 1850, when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. By 1892 it had been acquired by Sir Gilbert Greenall, later Baron Daresbury. During the Second World War, it was used as a military hospital and also by a charity, now known as Scope. It became semi-derelict after being bought by a millionaire who died before restoration could take place. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of 750.000 was discovered at the estate. In 2016 there were plans to partly demolish and convert the house but in June of that year the empty building was badly damaged by fire. Unfortunately, during our visit, we were asked to leave the sight by security via a speaker system on the estate. We did, however, stick around for 20 mins until it went off again, to be honest, I'm not sure whether the system is automated and linked to motion sensors. There is a lot of cameras on the sight too as shown the last pic. Any way we couldn't enter the property as it is completely sealed now with boards on all windows and doors etc except for a stable and a few dilapidated sheds. We did the best we could in the situation we had. Thanks for any feedback.
  15. Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.
  16. We visited St John's Hospital in Lincolnshire on Sunday, here is our video. Although we were told the security at the hospital was extremely tight we didn't actually come across any security at all! They must have been having a day off lol.
  17. Intro. Ok got bored being in all time has you do so decided to go out and explore. Wanted to do this for quite a while so went down solo (At First). When i got there was checking out the place and access etc when i found it a damn car pulled up and sat for ages right outside. So grabbed some grub and heading back where i spotted a lady right near access and was having a nosy lol. So i introduced myself would be rude not to. Turned out it was Hedgie with another person i didn't catch name sorry just coming out. After some good pointers i realized its way to much just for me solo and with night upon me so called for reinforcements. An hour later my friends turned up Tina and tony. Then off we went. All i can say was this was one of the most fun and awesome places i have been for a while. Loved it and hope you like pics. History. St Joseph's Hospital was erected on Mount Street, Preston in 1877 by Mrs Maria Holland for the benefit of the sick poor. It was opened in 1879 and run by the Sisters of Charity of our Lady Mother of Mercy, who also ran St Joseph's Orphanage in Theatre street. In 1884, it opened up two rooms as accommodation for private patients, and during the First World War it provided care for wounded soldiers (often Belgians). The Hospital was later recognised as a training centre for nurses, and accepted its first trainees in 1958. The Hospital closed in the late 1980s,The Sisters of Charity are still based in Mount Street at Provincial House. St Joseph�s is a Grade II listed former orphanage and maternity hospital developed as a sequence of buildings from 1872 through to the 1950�s. The original building is a two storey, red brick building in a high gothic style with a tower over the original entrance. The later 1930�s and 1950�s buildings are in a simple modernist style in brick. The buildings are arranged around a courtyard but one that is hidden from view despite its central location. The buildings are an important landmark and a significant part of Preston�s Victorian heritage and social history. Although the buildings have consent for conversion to residential use they have been vacant for a number of years. The site is in private ownership. Also this is the place george formby died. Here is an interesting link about this. http://www.blogpreston.co.uk/2013/0...george-formbys-death-and-his-link-to-preston/ Enjoy the pics Thanks for looking. Hope you enjoyed.
  18. Adders and extreme_ironing were subjected to a lethal case of flatulence on this fine night, I had previously eaten 7 packets of beef flavoured space raiders, a jacket potato with cheese, several crackers and cheese, and some Japanese ramen. A few sips of lager were enough to cause some kind of chemical reaction inside me and the effects were horrifying. They tried to escape the smells by climbing up this crane to get away from me, but I was too nimble and followed them up there. They will forever suffer in silence for what happened that night. Here are a few shots, these contractors are working on several sites in the area worth keeping an eye on at the moment. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Thanks for looking
  19. Before heading to Ushaw Seminary we decided to have a go getting into a small morgue. We managed to get in fairly easy but didnt spend long inside as there wasn't much to see. Let me know what you think though Thanks Visited with Raz and Fatpanda
  20. Visited this wonderful place many time and it never fails me. Been with diffrent people who I've arranged to to from various urbex sites not forgetting woopashoopaa and also come across many others in there so you no who you are and nice to meet you guys.. Let's say the entrance isn't the easiest I've done but I like a challenge whe all the hype St joes gets with all its alarms and cameras and secca it's not a bad thing as it keeps out the vandals and the like. And the alarms aren't the kindest on the eardrums I call it the sonic attack. Anyways here's a few photos and a bit of history ... HistorySt Joseph’s Seminary at Upholland opened in 1883, the first phase was built to a design by James O’Bryne. Set amongst a backdrop of copse and wildwood amidst gently sloping fields, the buildings are flanked with rough-hewn stone. An upper and lower lake are separated by a gentle and soothing waterfall. 1 The 150 acres of land the seminary is built upon had been purchased at auction in 1877. The grandeur of the chapels, meeting rooms, fixtures and fittings was unbelievable.The seminary was closed during WW1 and reopened in 1919 along with a junior seminary. The second phase of construction commenced in 1923. The design was in a different style to the original buildings, however it was equally as grand. Landscaped gardens and sports facilities were also completed by 1927. A new chapel was added in 1930 along with 14 sub chapels. The final addition to the site was a science block. 2St Joseph’s, usually referred to by its students simply as Upholland, was the main seminary serving the North West of England. The sister seminary at Ushaw provided the same services for the North East. Both institutions housed both a junior and senior seminary. The junior seminaries provided secondary education in a semi-monastic environment to boys aged 11 to 18 who wished to pursue the priesthood. The senior seminary taught adults philosophy and theology as they prepared for priesthood.
  21. visited here with woopashoopaa was a really nice and relaxed visit after a failed attempt at another place on the way here.this place has so many nice features still intact so please be kind to this place ok heres a bit of history and a few pics thanks for looking... St Saviour's Parish Church New Line, Bacup The origins of St. Saviour's At Stubbylee Hall, Bacup, lived Mr. John Holt, J.P., a Christian man with a real concern for the spiritual needs of the people living on his estate around the Lee Mill area. His dreams of building a church were not fulfilled in his own lifetime. When St. John's fell into a state of extreme disrepair and collapse a committee was formed to rebuild it but progress in making the necessary arrangements was so slow that one of the members of the committee, Mr. James Maden Holt (the son of Mr. John Holt) withdrew and determined to go ahead with the building of a church at Stubbylee. After obtaining the consent of the incumbent of St. John's, the Rev. B. Tweedale, and of the Bishop of the diocese to the assignment of a district for the proposed new church, Mr. Holt looked round for a suitable clergyman to tackle the undertaking. He learned that the Rev. William Whitworth, Vicar of St. Jude's, Ancoats, was willing to accept the onerous task of working up the new- parish and invited him to be the first vicar. Mr. Whitworth was duly licensed and began his labours in an old mill at Rockliffe. It was intended that these premises should be only temporary so very few alterations were made. The floor was covered with sawdustand benches mounted on bricks were used as pews. Worship commenced there in 1854. Work now began on the Sunday School building in New Line and was completed in 1858. The congregation and scholars were called together for a final address by Mr. Whitworth in Rockliffe Mill. A procession then formed and marched to the new school, which was opened by Mr. Whitworth who gave a further address. The upper part of the school was used as a church for the next few years. The vicarage was built next and Mr. Whitworth took up residence there about 1860, shortly before the building of the church commenced. The church was consecrated on Monday, the 23rd of January, 1865, by the Lord Bishop of Manchester, the Right Rev. J. Fraser, and was designated "St. Saviour's, Bacup". Representatives of the local Wesleyan, Baptist and Independent churches were present at the service. The cost of the erection of the church, school and vicarage was borne entirely by Mr. James Maden Holt and amounted, as near as can be ascertained, to £8,000, £2,000 and £1,400 respectively, exclusive of the value of the sites. The new church The architect employed by Mr. Maden Holt was E. Wyndham Tarn of London. The church, 120 ft. long and 53 ft. wide was built in the Early Pointed Gothic style from stone quarried on Mr. Holt's estate with pillars of polished red granite. Seating accommodation was provided for 1,000 people. The tower, which stands on the north side of the chancel, is surmounted by a spire 150 ft. in height. A small transept was built on the south side of the church. It was used originally as a pew for the Holt family but later the font was transferred to this chapel from its former position in the chancel. The church contains a baptistry for the immersion of adults. It is sunk in the chancel floor and is covered by an ornamental grating. The above information was obtained from the 1865 - 1965 Centenary Handbook When the Reverend Eddie Ashworth retired in 1999 the parish became a joint benifice with Holy Trinity Church, Stacksteads. The Church held it's final service in October 2007 and the parish merged with Holy Trinity, Tunstead.
  22. ROF Featherstone is one of those sites that I had been meaning to visit for ages but always found something else to occupy myself with, but after the spanner in the works yesterday of being told that the main target of todays trip was sealed and alarmed we decided to make the 'back-up' site the main explore with the visiting of other back-ups after. However after a truly fraught journey involving mega delays - thanks to the 42 car pile-up on the M40 and the awful roadworks on the M5, and a lunch break - we only had time for this place. As far as explores go it'll never set the world on fire but it was a nice chilled wander, and this place is massive with dozens of different buildings albeit a bit samey after a while. There isn't much left inside at all but it has a bundle of brilliant graffiti dotted around which was nice to see. Half the site is now the location of HMP Oakwood and this half is just sat there doing nothing for the time being. Some of the choice graffiti. Thanks for looking more photos here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157650804420142/
  23. I've had my eye on this Silo for a few years as my girlfriend used to work not far from this site so I used to see it everytime I would go and meet up with her. I had a wonder about a few times with a friend but it always seemed very busy down there , anyway the whole place had shut down so I had to give it a go. it was a bit foggy but on a clear night you should be able to see for miles sorry to say its gone now but it was a good one for the very short time it was there. I found a small bit of info on the net sorry its not much .. Tunnel Refineries changed its name to Amylum which is the latin for Starch The 50 acre site at Greenwich processes crops such as wheat and maize and extracts starch. The starch is then converted into glucose syrup. The syrup is then forwarded into the food chain and appears in most processed foods that we eat. this is the fire escape you have to climb. its well fucked and you have to step over a big gap but it all adds to the fun
  24. A small castle, somewhere in Belgium. Vandals did a part of their job, but decay is deffinetly King in this castle. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11
  25. A rare visit from me in the Military section, in fact wasn't sure to post here or in the underground This was a opportunity I had to jump on quickly after seeing a report elsewhere and gathering that demolition was about to start. After all, its not every day you can explore a former 1950's nuclear bunker. I arrived after dark to help avoid security - inside was pitch black anyway. After 10 minutes I heard voices and met another couple of explorers - James and Joe - whose extra lighting meant a big improvement to some of my shots. Much appreciated!! Here is some background info on the site, most of it taken from an article in the Yorkshire Evening Post from Nick Catford, author of the book Cold War Bunkers. Officially known as the Leeds War Room Region 2. The bunker was one of 13 built in the 1950s as the fear of nuclear attack from the Soviet Union gripped the West. In the event of war the bunker would have housed a cabinet minister acting as an emergency Regional Commissioner and it was he who would have been responsible for directing the strategic response to air raids across the region. Designed to withstand the force of a 500lb medium capacity bomb, the bunker’s occupants would have reported to a central Government War Room in London. It was equipped with a two-floor operations room and stations to house a small army of civil servants. There was a hospital, telephone exchange and male and female dormitories. An air filtration plant strained and filtered out radioactive contamination, ensuring the bunker’s occupants were protected from deadly fallout dust. A key role in the Leeds bunker would have been played by those responsible for keeping communications up and running. The war room needed to keep in contact with a host of smaller bunkers that would be feeding them information on bomb drops and fallout patterns. To that end the bunker was equipped with a telephone exchange that was wired into a secret underground network running all over the country that had been built by the General Post Office (the predecessor to British Telecom) after the Second World War. The development of the hydrogen bomb – which was 1,000 times as powerful as the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945 – meant that instead of a long war planners now anticipated a short, devastating attack on major cities. The expectation of mutually assured destruction meant that the war rooms were both inadequately protected and seen as too small to support the large live-in staff that would be needed in the wake of a major nuclear strike. Instead, they were replaced by a network of much larger bunkers known as Regional Government Headquarters. The Leeds war room was downgraded to the status of a sub-regional control centre which was subordinate to the local RGHQ at Shipton, near York. After 1968 Leeds City Council took it over as a more localised control centre for Leeds itself and the bunker remained in use until about 1981, although only the upper level was occupied. By the early 1990s it had been decommissioned as the threat of nuclear war was seen to have passed. In 2011 it was one of only 4 still in existence, but, shamefully this fascinating and important legacy of the Cold War has recently been demolished.
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