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  1. A night in the Paris Metro My first report for a while and I felt that my photos from each location wouldn't create a substantial enough report. Because of this I decided to compile them into a more lengthy post documenting the night in which we explored various sections of the Paris Metro. I hope you enjoy reading my story and seeing the images I managed to capture. After arriving in Paris with @Letchbo for a short weekend break, we decided to begin our night of exploring by hitting a classic metro spot. Once we'd safely entered the area we wanted to photograph, we hid in an alcove for a short period of time. Patiently waiting for the end of service with front row seats to watch the last remaining trains hurl past us. As soon the service concluded for the night, we eagerly got our cameras out and started shooting. Fortunately we managed to grab a couple of decent photos before we heard what we presumed were track workers approaching nearby. We quickly concluded it was best to abort mission and keep moving ahead. Photographing sections of track as we progressed down the line, until we reached the next station and swiftly departed unnoticed. By the time we were back out above ground the night was still young and we headed onto our next location. View of a train passing on Line 10 The double raccord We'd visited this spot earlier in the year along with @Conrad and @DirtyJigsaw after visiting another of Paris' famous ghost stations. But when we arrived at this one, we noticed a large number workers across the tracks and decided to give it a miss. Fast forward to October, we thought try our luck again. My partner made his way over the fence but as I was about to climb in and join him, someone abruptly stopped me in my tracks. "Bonsoir!" "Bonsoir?" The rather authoritative looking chap approached me and continued speaking to me in French (to which I didn't fully understand.) I politely explained we were English. He then proceeded to pull a badge out and clearly stated to me the word every urban explorer wants to hear on a night out exploring the metro. "Police." Oh fuck. That's when we thought the night had sadly come to a prompt conclusion. Fortunately for us after a brief discussion with us claiming to be photographing the canal, he decided to allow us to resume our business and once he was well out of sight we made our way straight in. Onto a bit of history, Arsenal station was officially opened in 1906 and is located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. In addition to this, it is also situated on line 5 between the Bastille and Quai de la Rapée stations. After 33 years of operation, it was closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. This was due to French resistance members allocating the area as an ammunition depot. Once Paris had been liberated from German forces August of 1944, a battle more commonly known as Battle for Paris and Belgium. It was decided reopening Arsenal would be inefficient. This was on account of its close proximity to neighbouring stations which limited the flow of passengers. For 75 years the station has been largely abandoned aside from graffers, urban explorers, photographers and avid thrill seekers, such as ourselves. Once we'd grabbed a few shots of the abandoned Arsenal Station, we continued photographing another small section of track further down the line. It was quite photogenic and was a welcomed bonus to what had already been a predominately successful night for the both of us. Before long the morning was fast approaching, coinciding with the threat of the service resuming. We reluctantly called it a night, making our way out and back to our accommodation, covered in metro dust and feeling pretty relieved we managed to pull it all off after a few close encounters. As always if you got this far, thanks for reading
  2. Two weeks ago I drove with a female friend (no Urbexer and thus also no forum member) for three days to France. This castle has been on my to-do-list for a long time, so I wanted to visit it now. Directly above the castle is a lonely but inhabited house. Maybe the owner, and he was at home. That's why we acted very quietly, so he couldn't hear us and luckily he also didn't see us (unfortunately, Germans are often not very welcome in France because of the past. And French people respond even much more unfriendly and very aggressive when they catch Germans while exploring an abandoned place ...). The castle was built in the middle of the 19th century, more precisely in 1849, for a count family. During the Second World War, the castle burned down. Through reparation payments, the roof, as well as some ceilings and a staircase inside of the building has been repaired after the war. But nothing more did happen since then. Today, the castle itself is just an unadorned shell and completely empty. So I took only one photo from a former fireplace inside of it. Otherwise, there was nothing to see except ugly concrete from the earlier repairs. However, much more interesting was one of the smaller buildings in front of the castle. On the ground floor there was an old bed with metal frame and, picturesque, a cross in front of an ivy-covered window. On the first floor of this house, to reach via a stone spiral staircase, was also a chapel; beautiful with a rose window, colored / painted panes and angel figures on the wall, as well as several wine bottles in a corner next to the altar. The upper floor couldn't be entered anymore, the roof had already collapsed there. The same applies to another building next to it, which had already completely collapsed inside. Also nice was an abandoned truck in front of the castle. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  3. The hostel on the mountain, opened in the 1960s or earlier, was a simple accommodation. Last guest reviews complain about lack of comfort and high prices for an overnight stay. Last one night in a 5-bed room cost 40 euros per person. In the dining room there was no selection of different meals to order, but only a simple daily special for all. In the summer of 2011, the hostel was finally closed. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  4. A lot of old cars were stored in a tunnel. When we arrived there, we met the buyers of the vehicles. They were about to load vehicles and get ready for transport. We were kindly allowed to take photos.
  5. A nice French farmhouse, located on the edge of a small village in southern Alsace. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  6. In the region of Bourgogne in France there was an old man living in a little village with his 5 dogs and his donkey. Once he has been a successful rallye driver and a car developer working in Nizza. He decided to collect the cars he used once and behind his house you could find a huge collection of rarely old racing cars decayed by nature. But that was not enough, he also collected cars around his garage and on a little estate a few hundred meters away from his house. Firstly we went there in 2016 but the old man wasn't there, so we had no chance to take a look at his sporting car collection and also no way to see his garage. Sadly we walked around and by chance we found the other estate few hundred meters away. Once it has been a normal field and now it was a thick forest. Never seen old cars became a part of the nature like this before. We were absolutely enchanted of this place and that's the reason why we called it 'Magic Forest'. We couldn't finish to shoot the cars cause sunset was coming. We decided to come back to this wonderful place to meet the old guy and to see his other collection. But at our next visit his house was demolished. The old decayed cars were laying on an heap and the digger was still running. We met the daughter of the old man there and she told us that he died. She will bring the hole area back to a field and depollute the cars. The really expensive cars she put into a closed hall and maybe sell it. Damn this was a little shock for us. The demolishing of our 'Magic Forest' had already began but fortunately we could see the most of it again for last time. Now everything is gone. Everyone who shooted cars already knows that it's often not easy with the space and the light. Same here... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
  7. In a very small French village stands this impressive house. Totally free from vandalism and with a bit of natural decay. In the past, a professor used to live there, which explains all the utensils.
  8. A nice and fully furnished Maison in a small village in France.
  9. It's been a long time that I posted something here. Missing the time for the editing of the photo's. This was my last explore and it was an underground adventure with the same partner of all the underground explores. It's was an iron mine that closed several decades ago like many others in that neighbourhood.It was a nice walk to find an entrance (not the main entrance ). It was inside warmer than outside. This time only one level explored but probably there are more entry's because there was also some kind of elevator (not found thou but other explorer did). There were a lot of collapses places. All the timber was parished and the metal well rusted. Also some cracks in the ceiling. Nice that there were some painted street names on the wall (some in German, other in French). There was every ware since of life ( fungi's, in white and yellow). Animal bones, one bat and animal excrements that turned in something fluffy by the fungi that were growing on that). For the rest the mine was well stripped of almost all the rails and cables. But never the less, a nice trip. 1 it's going to be a bumpy ride IMG_3050 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 hold on to the railing IMG_3048-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 end of the line IMG_3045-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 big pulley (fisheye) IMG_3041-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 tunnel of fungi life in white and yellow IMG_3037-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 that cart didn't make it out IMG_3034 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 stack 'm up IMG_3031 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 light in the" pouderie" IMG_3026-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 the main tunnel IMG_3009-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 iron bows IMG_3014 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 dancing on the ceiling IMG_3018-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  10. This area was a powerplant of a coalmine.
  11. Dieses Sanatorium wurde 1898 gegründet und diente im WK I als Lazarett. 1965 kam dan die Umwandlung in ein normales Krankenhaus und 2000 folgte dann die komplette Schließung.
  12. Built in 1800s (?) . At least 800-900 m2 (?) . Large gated garden/grounds. Big garage & pool. On the banks of the river Seine. I'd like to know everything about the house(/place) what is there to know - in details. (My guesses are only estimates. Google Maps & Earth don't give much to work with). Someone could set an expedition on the site ; possibly with a drone ?
  13. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kxl1hb4Tec The train in question is the Eurostar 373018, one of many Eurostar Class 373 trains that started operating in 1994. Capable of speeds up to 186 mph, the Class 373s were specifically designed to transport passengers between London, Paris, and Brussels via the Channel Tunnel. Since 2016, however, many 373s have been withdrawn or scrapped, despite just 22 or 23 years in service. Eurostar 373018 is officially in storage, but the word “abandoned” seems more appropriate. Branches from nearby trees now reach out and touch its windows. Weeds rise up from the rusting tracks on which it sits. Graffiti covers what were once the clean lines of the train’s streamlined form. It looks like the kind of place where Rick Grimes would butcher a bunch of zombies, or where Mad Max would go shopping if he wanted to buy a train. What the future holds for this high-speed train is anyone’s guess. So far, 18 of the 373 Class trains have been sent to be scrapped by European Metal Recycling (EMR) at Kingsbury in the West Midlands region of England. Others have been scrapped in France, three have ended up in museums or colleges, and some lucky 373s have been refurbished and remain in service. Eurostar 373018, however, remains in “storage” in the north of France, a fine nesting place for birds, an interesting canvas for graffiti artists, and an intriguing landmark for train enthusiasts, eagle-eyed users of Google Earth, and urban explorers like AdcaZz whose video exploration of the train you can check out on YouTube. And if you’re wondering why these 373s were abandoned and not reused elsewhere, well, it seems like a few factors were in play. Technology had simply moved on, leaving these 22-year-old trains out of date. It was also more cost efficient to bring in a modern fleet rather than overhaul these existing trains, especially as the replacements had a greater seating capacity, meaning more money over less time. In the end, therefore, many of the 373s were deemed “life-expired.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kxl1hb4Tec
  14. Return to the forbidden area of the catacombs of paris, this time accompanied to get as far as possible, I hope you enjoy it.
  15. We went to this really impressed location. The security there is very high and some people said it is impossible to get in. We made it without any problems.
  16. Hi everyone! I'm looking for people to visit locations together, somewhere in Belgium, NL, Luxembourg, France, or nearby) I'm rather experienced with urbex, but I don't really like doing it alone and it's hard to find people who also understand what they're doing at locations. I'm mostly interested in metro/underground stuff and roofs. Soon I'm planning to search for some roofs in Brussels and Amsterdam, and check out local metro. If you'd like to join me - let me know!
  17. Explored alone the forbidden catacombs of París, the most amazing experience that I have lived as an urban explorer, I will repeat soon:
  18. We didn't really know what to expect with this one, only found on Google Earth, few recent informations... But life can also be surprising, and this time, it was good ! ? Built during the 13th century and redesign during the 14th and the 18th, it was finally bought by a famous author in the mid 50's. Well known to be a writing haven for the writer, the castle is also known to have hosted some memorable parties with memorable people : Authors, journalists even politics... The Castle was sold a few years the death of his owner to a businessman who wanted to create a place dedicated solely to Art But nothing happened since then... The castle now stand, almost empty, in the middle of nowhere, waiting for a new life.
  19. Somewhere in a small french village is these castle located. Lot of rooms wich a fully furnished and a lot of other stuff are in the rooms. There are also more then 100 books.
  20. I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
  21. All, Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too. I wont bore you any longer, but heres some history of the station stolen from Google Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris. The station was closed on 2 September 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation with a lot of traffic passing through, but was eventually closed again as a result of its proximity to the neighboring station of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis, which lies only 100 metres away. In the past, the station served to shelter homeless persons, and the eastern section of the location is currently used as a day shelter for the homeless (managed by the Salvation Army). The station closed on 2nd September 1939. Heres afew of my shots i took Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for looking. DJ
  22. The secrets of the legendary catacombs of Paris, a tunnel system that spans more than 280km in length. The catacombs in Paris hold remains of more than six million people. They are part of a tunnel network that runs below Paris that is more than 280 kilometers long. No one knows how far the tunnels extend in total, as there are still many paths that are unmapped and even undiscovered. The main reason behind the tunnels was to extract Lutetian limestone for use as a building material. For instance, parts of the Louvre, the Place de la Concorde and Les Invalides were built with limestone from this tunnel system. The catacombs only take up about 2.1km of the tunnel system and they are the only part that is legally accessible. Even though that is the case, many people refer to the surrounding tunnel network when speaking about the "Catacombs of Paris". The ossuary was created in the late 1700s to tackle the problem of overflowing cemeteries and until the early 19th century, the ossuary was largely forgotten until it became a novelty place for concerts and other private events. The network is mostly intact today and is regularily toured by urban explorers or so called "Cataphiles". If anyone is curious about the way we took, the names of the rooms we went into and a bit of a sidestory, here's the full post (warning: It's damn long and I feel it would overcrowd the forums) Also, even though I posted a lot of photos, these are not all, so feel free to check out the rest of them if anyone has gotten curious. LINK: http://inwordsandpictures.net/catacombs FULL-ALBUM: https://flic.kr/s/aHskDMEvnC INSTAGRAM: ofcdnb DSC_9230 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9239 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9241 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9245 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9250 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9254 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9257 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9265_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9276 by anthrax, auf Flickr SC_9279 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9281 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9283_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9290_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9311 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9338 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9343_2 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_9346_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  23. An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  24. It was a very long trip on this day - 23.5 hours on the road, 1480 km driven... But it was worth it. In the afternoon we reached our third place, this old house on the outskirts of a small village. From the outside it was already pretty overgrown. Nevertheless, access wasn't difficult. Inside were old furniture, various dolls, a piano, and everything surrounded by beautiful decay. Only the smell of a decaying fox in the entrance area wasn't really pleasant... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
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